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S-1 Form - General form for registration of securities under the Securities Act of 1933 - Galera Therapeutics, Inc. (0001563577) (Filer)

S-11d692555ds1.htmS-1S-1
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As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 11, 2019.

Registration No. 333-

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM S-1

REGISTRATION STATEMENT

UNDER

THE SECURITIES ACTOF 1933

 

 

Galera Therapeutics, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Delaware 2834 46-1454898
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 (Primary Standard Industrial
Classification Code Number)
 (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

2 W Liberty Blvd #100

Malvern, PA 19355

(610) 725-1500

(Address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, ofregistrant’s principal executive offices)

 

 

J. Mel Sorensen

Chief Executive Officer

2 W Liberty Blvd #100

Malvern, PA 19355

(610) 725-1500

(Name, address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, ofagent for service)

 

 

Copies to:

 

Peter N. Handrinos

Nathan Ajiashvili

Latham & Watkins LLP

200 Clarendon Street

Boston, MA 02116

(617) 948-6000

  Ilir Mujalovic

Shearman & Sterling LLP

599 Lexington Avenue

NewYork, NY 10022

(212) 848-4000

 

 

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public:

As soon as practicable after the effective date of this Registration Statement.

If any of the securities being registered on this Form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under theSecurities Act of 1933, check the following box.  ☐

If this Form is filed to register additional securities for an offeringpursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, please check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ☐

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act,check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ☐

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act,check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, anon-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer”, “smaller reportingcompany” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer  ☐                     Accelerated filer  ☐  Non-accelerated filer  ☒                     Smaller reporting company  ☒
    Emerging growth company  ☒

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extendedtransition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act. ☒

 

 

CALCULATION OFREGISTRATION FEE

 

 

Title of Each Class of Securities
To Be Registered
 Proposed Maximum
Aggregate Offering
Price(1)
 Amount of
Registration Fee(2)

Common Stock, $0.001 par value per share

 

$86,250,000

 

$11,195.25

 

 

 

(1)

Estimated solely for the purpose of calculating the registration fee pursuant to Rule 457(o) under theSecurities Act of 1933, as amended. Includes the aggregate offering price of additional shares that the underwriters have the option to purchase.

 

(2)

Calculated pursuant to Rule 457(o) based on an estimate of the proposed maximum aggregate offering price.

 

 

The Registrant hereby amends this Registration Statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until theRegistrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this Registration Statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933 or until the Registration Statement shallbecome effective on such date as the Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.

 

 

 


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The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sellthese securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state wherethe offer or sale is not permitted.

 

Subject to Completion

Preliminary Prospectus dated October 11, 2019.

PROSPECTUS

             Shares

 

LOGO

Common Stock

 

 

This is GaleraTherapeutics, Inc.’s initial public offering. We are selling                      shares of our common stock.

We expect the public offering price to be between$                         and$                     per share. Currently, no public market exists for the shares. We have applied to list our common stock on the Nasdaq GlobalMarket under the symbol “GRTX.”

We are an “emerging growth company” under the federal securities laws and aresubject to reduced public company disclosure standards. See “Prospectus Summary—Implications of Being an Emerging Growth Company.”

Investing in the common stock involves risks that are described in the “Risk Factors” sectionbeginning on page 13 of this prospectus.

 

 

 

   

Per Share

     

Total

 

Public offering price

  $      $  

Underwriting discount(1)

  $      $  

Proceeds, before expenses, to us

  $      $  

 

 (1)

We refer you to “Underwriting” beginning on page 171 for additional information regardingunderwriting compensation.

The underwriters may also exercise their option to purchase up to an additional                     shares from us, at the public offering price, less the underwriting discount, for 30 days after the date of this prospectus.

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities ordetermined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

The shares will be readyfor delivery on or about                    , 2019.

 

 

 

BofA Merrill Lynch Citigroup Credit Suisse

BTIG

 

 

The date of thisprospectus is                    , 2019.


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

   Page 

PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

   1 

RISK FACTORS

   13 

SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

   71 

MARKET AND INDUSTRY DATA

   73 

USE OF PROCEEDS

   74 

DIVIDEND POLICY

   75 

CAPITALIZATION

   76 

DILUTION

   78 

SELECTED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

   81 

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

   83 

BUSINESS

   98 

MANAGEMENT

   133 

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

   141 

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

   151 

PRINCIPAL STOCKHOLDERS

   155 

DESCRIPTION OF CAPITAL STOCK

   159 

SHARES ELIGIBLE FOR FUTURE SALE

   164 

MATERIAL U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSEQUENCES TO NON-U.S. HOLDERS

   167 

UNDERWRITING

   171 

LEGAL MATTERS

   179 

EXPERTS

   179 

WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION

   179 

INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

   F-1 

 

 

We have not, and the underwriters have not, authorized anyone to provide any information or to make any representations other than thosecontained in this prospectus or in any free writing prospectuses prepared by or on behalf of us or to which we have referred you. We take no responsibility for, and can provide no assurance as to the reliability of, any other information that othersmay give you. This prospectus is an offer to sell only the shares of common stock offered hereby, but only under circumstances and in jurisdictions where it is lawful to do so. The information contained in this prospectus or in any applicable freewriting prospectus is current only as of its date, regardless of its time of delivery or any sale of shares of our common stock. Our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may have changed since that date.

For investors outside the United States: We have not, and the underwriters have not, done anything that would permit this offering orpossession or distribution of this prospectus in any jurisdiction where action for that purpose is required, other than in the United States. Persons outside the United States who come into possession of this prospectus must inform themselves about,and observe any restrictions relating to, the offering of the shares of common stock and the distribution of this prospectus outside the United States.

TRADEMARKS

Thisprospectus includes our trademarks and trade names, including, without limitation, GALERA, GALERA THERAPEUTICS and our logo, which are our property and are protected under applicable intellectual property laws. This prospectus also containstrademarks, trade names and service marks of other companies, which are the property of their respective owners. Solely for convenience, trademarks, trade names and service marks referred to in this prospectus may appear without the ®, ™ or SM symbols, but such references are not intended to indicate, in any way, that we or the applicable owner will not assert, to thefullest extent permitted under applicable law, our or its rights or the right of any applicable licensor to these trademarks, trade names and service marks. We do not intend our use or display of other parties’ trademarks, trade names orservice marks to imply, and such use or display should not be construed to imply, a relationship with, or endorsement or sponsorship of us by, these other parties.

 

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PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

This summary highlights information contained elsewhere in this prospectus. This summary does not contain all of the information you shouldconsider before investing in our common stock. You should read this entire prospectus carefully, especially the “Risk Factors” section beginning on page 13 and our financial statements and the related notes appearing at the end ofthis prospectus, before making an investment decision.

Unless the context requires otherwise, references to “Galera,”the “Company,” “we,” “us,” and “our,” refer to Galera Therapeutics, Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries.

Overview

We are a clinical stagebiopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing a pipeline of novel, proprietary therapeutics that have the potential to transform radiotherapy in cancer. We leverage our expertise in superoxide dismutase mimetics to design drugsto reduce normal tissue toxicity from radiotherapy and to increase the anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy. Our lead product candidate, GC4419, is a potent and highly selective small molecule dismutase mimetic we are initially developing for thereduction of severe oral mucositis, or SOM. SOM is a common, debilitating complication of radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer, or HNC. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, has granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation toGC4419 for the reduction of the duration, incidence and severity of SOM induced by radiotherapy. In October 2018, we began evaluating GC4419 in a Phase 3 registrational trial and we expect to report top-linedata from this trial in the first half of 2021. We believe GC4419, which to date is not approved for any indication, has the potential to be the first FDA-approved drug and the standard of care for thereduction of SOM in patients with HNC receiving radiotherapy, and we plan to further evaluate its use in other radiotherapy-induced toxicities.

We demonstrated proof-of-concept with GC4419 in SOM in arandomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled 223-patient Phase 2b trial. In the trial, GC4419 met the primary endpoint by demonstrating a 92% reduction in the median duration of SOM in the 90 mg treatmentarm as compared to placebo, which was statistically significant and consistent with the results of our Phase 1b/2a SOM trial. Key secondary endpoints evaluating the incidence and severity of SOM also demonstrated substantial dose-dependentreductions of 34% and 47%, respectively, in the 90 mg treatment arm, and GC4419 was well tolerated in this trial. In addition, in this trial, the anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy was maintained through one year when combined with GC4419.

Radiotherapy-induced SOM can lead to devastating complications. A majority of patients will suffer severe pain which is often managedwith the use of opioids. Patients with SOM are at risk of dehydration and malnutrition as a result of the inability to eat or drink, and often require nutrition through a feeding tube or intravenous line. SOM can also be dose-limiting, requiring areduction or delay in subsequent radiotherapy, leading to poorer clinical outcomes. SOM is particularly common among patients with HNC receiving radiotherapy.

Each year in the United States, approximately 65,000 patients are diagnosed with HNC. We estimate that approximately 65% of patients diagnosedwith HNC will be treated with radiotherapy. All patients with HNC treated with radiotherapy are at risk for developing SOM. We believe, if approved, GC4419 would be prescribed by physicians as standard-of-care treatment for patients with HNCreceiving radiotherapy.

We plan to expand the evaluation of GC4419 into the reduction of radiotherapy-induced esophagitis, or mucositisof the esophagus, which is often seen in patients receiving radiotherapy for thoracic tumors. Esophagitis is a frequent and radiotherapy-limiting side effect in these patients. Symptoms can be life-threatening and include an inability to swallow,severe pain, ulceration, infection, bleeding and weight loss and may require hospitalization. Radiotherapy-induced esophagitis represents a significant unmet need. In our initial target



 

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indication for esophagitis, lung cancer, there are approximately 230,000 new patients annually in the United States, of which approximately 50,000 are treated with radiotherapy.

Building upon extensive pre-clinical data showing that our dismutase mimetics also increased the anti-cancer efficacy of higher daily doses ofradiotherapy, we are further developing our dismutase mimetics in this area. We expect to report top-line data from our pilot Phase 1b/2a trial of GC4419 in combination with stereotactic body radiation therapy, or SBRT, in locally advancedpancreatic cancer, or LAPC, in the second half of 2020. We plan to leverage the data from this trial to help develop GC4711, our second dismutase mimetic product candidate, to increase the anti-cancer efficacy of SBRT. We have successfully completeda Phase 1 trial of intravenous GC4711 in healthy volunteers and plan to commence a Phase 1b/2a trial of GC4711 in combination with SBRT in non-small cell lung cancer, or NSCLC, in the second half of2020.

We retain worldwide rights to our product candidate portfolio. Our product candidate portfolio is protected by issued patents withclaims directed to composition of matter and method of use, which, when including patent term extensions, are projected to expire between 2027 and 2038 in the United States.

Our management team has extensive drug development and commercialization experience ranging from discovery through market registrational andcommercial launches. Further, we are supported by a leading group of biotech investors including Adage Capital, Blackstone Life Sciences (formerly Clarus), HBM Healthcare, Nan Fung Life Sciences, New Enterprise Associates, Novartis Venture Fund,Novo Holdings, RA Capital, Rock Springs Capital, Sofinnova Investments and Tekla Capital.

Background on Superoxide Dismutases and Our DismutaseMimetics

Superoxide, a highly reactive molecule, is produced by every cell as a part of normal metabolism, but left uncontrolled itis highly toxic, leading to cell damage or cell death. To prevent this, the body produces superoxide dismutase enzymes, or SODs, which convert superoxide to hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide is much less toxic than superoxide to normal tissue,but more toxic to cancer cells. Radiotherapy induces a large burst of superoxide in the irradiated tissues, which can overwhelm these SODs, damaging normal cells. Such damage to the oral mucosa, located in the mouth, is referred to as oralmucositis, or OM.

Low molecular weight drugs that mimic native SODs could address the inability of SODs to keep up with the superoxidebursts produced by radiotherapy. The challenge has been finding small molecule dismutase mimetics with similarly fast catalytic rates and high selectivity for superoxide that are also stable, safe and suitable for manufacturing. We have designed,and are developing, our dismutase mimetics to have each of the following essential features—speed, selectivity, stability, safety and synthesis.



 

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Our Product Candidates

The following table summarizes our product candidates:

 

LOGO

 

 

(1)

We also plan to conduct a Phase 2a multi-center trial in Europe assessing the safety of 90 mg GC4419 in up to 70patients with HNC undergoing standard-of-care radiotherapy. We plan to initiate this trial in the first half of 2020.

 

(2)

Phase 2a trial in patients with lung cancer building on GC4419 safety and tolerability findings in patients withHNC SOM studies.

 

(3)

Observations from our Phase 1b/2a pilot trial of GC4419 in combination with SBRT in patients with LAPC whosetumor cannot be resected will be used to help develop GC4711 to increase the anti-cancer efficacy of SBRT.

GC4419 forRadiotherapy-Induced Severe Oral Mucositis

No drug has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of SOM in patients with HNC.Current measures attempting to moderate SOM include basic oral care; anti-inflammatory agents; antimicrobials, coating agents, anesthetics and analgesics; laser and other light therapy, cryotherapy; and natural and other miscellaneous agents. Thetreatment guidelines developed by the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer and International Society of Oral Oncology, or MASCC / ISOO, indicate that there is a high unmet need for the treatment or prevention of OM in patients withHNC, and a lack of clear efficacy with existing treatment options.

We believe that GC4419, which to date is not approved for anyindication, has the potential to be the first FDA-approved drug and the standard of care for the reduction of SOM in patients with HNC receiving radiotherapy, with the following benefits:

 

  

Mechanism of action designed to address the root cause of OM: Unlike existing treatment optionsthat are largely symptomatic and reactive in nature, we believe GC4419 has the potential to address and mitigate the root cause of OM. GC4419 is designed to rapidly convert superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, reducing mucosal damage and thereby theincidence and severity of mucositis.



 

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Compelling Randomized Phase 2b clinical data: Results from our Phase 2b trial demonstrate thepotential benefits of GC4419, across all evaluated parameters of SOM. GC4419 has received Fast Track and Breakthrough Therapy Designation from the FDA.

 

  

Maintenance of anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy: One year interim follow-up clinical data from our Phase 2b trial for GC4419 in patients with locally advanced HNC showed similar rates of tumor control and survival between GC4419 and placebo with no observed decrease in theanti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy. We believe this is significant as maintenance of anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy is of key importance to physicians when considering new drugs to manage side effects of radiotherapy.

 

  

Higher patient adherence: The intravenous formulation of GC4419, administered in a clinical settingby a health care provider, promotes higher patient adherence, optimizing clinical outcomes.

GC4419 for Radiotherapy-InducedEsophagitis

A second indication that we are evaluating for GC4419 is the treatment of radiotherapy-induced esophagitis. Similarto SOM in patients with HNC, there are also no drugs approved by the FDA for the treatment of radiotherapy-induced esophagitis, with treatment options focused on controlling the symptoms. By removingsuperoxide, GC4419 is designed to address the root cause of esophagitis and reduce the damage radiotherapy can cause to the patient’s esophageal mucosa, and thereby reduce the incidence of radiotherapy-induced esophagitis. We believe GC4419 hasthe potential to become the standard of care for the reduction in the incidence of radiotherapy-induced esophagitis. We intend to initiate a Phase 2a trial in the first half of 2020 for the reduction of the incidence of esophagitis in patients withlung cancer receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy, or IMRT.

GC4711 for Increasing the Anti-Cancer Efficacy of Radiotherapy

Cancer cells have been observed to be more susceptible than normal cells to increased levels of hydrogen peroxide. In our pre-clinicalstudies, we have observed increased anti-cancer efficacy of higher daily doses of radiotherapy in combination with our dismutase mimetics. In a pre-clinical study, we demonstrated that this increase in anti-cancer efficacy was due to the conversionof superoxide to hydrogen peroxide by our dismutase mimetics. This increased efficacy could be particularly important in settings where the anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy alone is insufficient to achieve the desired outcome.

We are currently conducting a pilot, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase 1b/2a trial of GC4419 in combination with SBRT in patients with LAPCwhose tumor cannot be resected. The primary objective of this trial is to determine the maximum tolerated daily dose of SBRT in conjunction with a dismutase mimetic, with secondary measures assessing, among others, progression-free survival andoverall response rate compared to placebo. We believe this combination therapy may lead to improved patient survival rates, which we will also track in our clinical development. We expect to report top-linedata from this trial in the second half of 2020.

We plan to leverage our observations from our GC4419 SBRT pilot Phase 1b/2a trial inLAPC to help develop GC4711 to increase the anti-cancer efficacy of SBRT. We have successfully completed a Phase 1 trial of intravenous GC4711 in healthy volunteers and plan to commence a Phase 1b/2a trial with GC4711 in combination with SBRT inpatients with NSCLC in the second half of 2020. In addition to this GC4711 Phase 1b/2a trial in NSCLC, we plan to conduct future trials in combination with SBRT with GC4711, including in LAPC if we are successful in our ongoing SBRT GC4419 pilotPhase 1b/2a trial in that indication. We are also currently evaluating several oral formulations of GC4711 in a Phase 1 trial in healthy volunteers, based on pre-clinical studies suggesting that GC4711 can bedelivered orally.



 

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Our Strategy

Our mission is to transform cancer therapy by reducing normal tissue toxicity induced by radiotherapy and to improve the lives of patientswith cancer. We are also seeking to increase the anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy with the use of our dismutase mimetics. Key elements of our strategy are as follows:

 

  

Complete the development and obtain FDA approval for GC4419 for the reduction of radiotherapy-inducedtoxicities. We are currently evaluating GC4419 in a Phase 3 registrational trial to reduce the incidence of SOM in patients receiving radiotherapy for locally advanced HNC. We expect to reporttop-line data from this trial in the first half of 2021. We also plan to initiate a Phase 2a trial in the first half of 2020 to assess GC4419 in combination with radiotherapy to reduce the incidence ofradiotherapy-induced esophagitis in patients with lung cancer. Based upon the outcomes of our ongoing and planned trials, we plan to initiate additional clinical trials for GC4419 to reduce radiotherapy-induced toxicities in other cancerindications.

 

  

Build a commercial infrastructure in the United States. We intend to commercialize GC4419, if approved, bybuilding a specialized sales and marketing organization in the United States focused on radiation oncologists. We believe a scientifically-oriented, customer-focused team of approximately 40 sales representatives would allow us to effectively reachthe approximately 4,000 radiation oncologists in the United States. We also expect to leverage this sales organization to commercialize GC4711, if approved, and any of our future product candidates in the United States. Outside the United States, wemay seek to establish collaborations for the commercialization of GC4419 and our other product candidates.

 

  

Advance the development of GC4711 in combination with SBRT to increase the anti-cancer efficacy ofradiotherapy. We successfully completed a Phase 1 trial with GC4711 in December 2017 in healthy volunteers, and plan to initiate a Phase 1b/2a trial with GC4711 in combination with SBRT in patients with NSCLC in the second half of 2020. Inaddition, upon the successful completion of our ongoing pilot Phase 1b/2a trial of GC4419 in combination with SBRT in patients with LAPC, and based upon FDA feedback, we expect to pursue further development in patients with LAPC with GC4711 incombination with SBRT. We expect to report top-line data from our pilot Phase 1b/2a trial of GC4419 in the second half of 2020.

 

  

Develop additional novel dismutase mimetics and formulations. We intend to leverage our expertise insuperoxide dismutase mimetics to continue to develop novel compounds that are intended to reduce normal tissue toxicity from radiotherapy and increase the anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy. In addition, we intend to seek new applications for ourdismutase mimetics, including potential combinations in cancer therapy.

 

  

Seek strategic collaborative relationships. We intend to seek strategic collaborations to facilitate thecapital-efficient development of our dismutase mimetics. We believe these collaborations could potentially provide significant funding to advance our dismutase mimetics candidate pipeline while allowing us to benefit from the development expertiseof our collaborators.



 

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Risks Associated with Our Business

Our business is subject to a number of risks that you should be aware of before making an investment decision. You should carefully considerall of the information set forth in this prospectus and, in particular, should evaluate the specific factors set forth under “Risk Factors” in deciding whether to invest in our common stock. Among these important risks are the following:

 

  

We are a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company with a limited operating history and have not generated anyrevenue from product sales. We have incurred significant operating losses since our inception and anticipate that we will incur continued losses for the foreseeable future.

 

  

We are heavily dependent on the success of our lead product candidate, GC4419, and if GC4419 does notsuccessfully complete clinical development or receive regulatory approval, or is not successfully commercialized, our business may be harmed.

 

  

Even if this offering is successful, we may need substantial additional funding to meet our financial obligationsand to pursue our business objectives. If we are unable to raise capital when needed, we could be forced to curtail our planned operations and the pursuit of our growth strategy.

 

  

The regulatory approval process is lengthy, expensive and uncertain, and we may be unable to obtain regulatoryapproval for our product candidates under applicable regulatory requirements. The denial or delay of any such approval, including as a result of the existence of any clinical holds, would delay commercialization of our product candidates andadversely impact our ability to generate revenue, our business and our results of operations.

 

  

We rely, and will continue to rely, on third parties to conduct our clinical trials for our product candidates,and those third parties may not perform satisfactorily, including failing to meet deadlines for the completion of such trials.

 

  

If we are unable to or experience delays in establishing our own sales, marketing and distribution capabilities,or in entering into agreements with third parties to sell and market GC4419 or any future product candidates, we may not be successful in commercializing our product candidates if and when they are approved, and we may not be able to generate anyrevenue.

 

  

We do not have our own manufacturing capabilities and will rely on third parties to produce additional clinicalsupplies, if needed, and commercial supplies of GC4419 and our other product candidates. This reliance on third parties increases the risk that we will not have sufficient quantities of our product candidates or such quantities at an acceptablecost, which could delay, prevent or impair our development or commercialization efforts.

 

  

The incidence and prevalence for target patient populations of our product candidates have not been establishedwith precision. If the market opportunities for our product candidates are smaller than we estimate, or if any approval that we obtain is based on a narrower definition of the patient population, our revenue and ability to achieve profitability maybe materially adversely affected.

 

  

If we are unable to adequately protect our product candidates, or to secure and maintain freedom to operate,others could preclude us from commercializing our product candidates or compete against us more directly.

 

  

The successful commercialization of GC4419 or any other product candidates will depend in part on the extent towhich governmental authorities and health insurers establish coverage, adequate



 

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reimbursement levels and pricing policies, which may depend in part on whether uses for our products are recommended in recognized drug compendia. Failure to obtain or maintain coverage andadequate reimbursement for our product candidates, if approved, could limit our ability to market those products and decrease our ability to generate revenue.

 

  

We face substantial competition, which may result in others discovering, developing or commercializing othertherapies before or more successfully than we do, which could materially adversely affect our business and financial condition.

 

  

Our product candidates may cause undesirable side effects or have other properties that could delay or preventtheir regulatory approval, cause us to suspend or discontinue clinical trials, limit the commercial profile of an approved label, or result in significant negative consequences following marketing approval, if any.

Implications of Being an Emerging Growth Company

We are an “emerging growth company” as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, or the JOBS Act. As such, we maytake advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other publicly-traded entities that are not emerging growth companies. These exemptions include:

 

  

the option to present only two years of audited financial statements and only two years of relatedManagement’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations in this prospectus;

 

  

not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended;

 

  

not being required to comply with any requirement that may be adopted by the Public Company Accounting OversightBoard regarding mandatory audit firm rotation or a supplement to the auditor’s report providing additional information about the audit and the financial statements (i.e., an auditor discussion and analysis);

 

  

not being required to submit certain executive compensation matters to stockholder advisory votes, such as “say-on-pay,” “say-on-frequency,” and “say-on-golden parachutes;” and

 

  

not being required to disclose certain executive compensation-related items such as the correlation betweenexecutive compensation and performance and comparisons of the chief executive officer’s compensation to median employee compensation.

As a result, we do not know if some investors will find our common stock less attractive. The result may be a less active trading market forour common stock, and the price of our common stock may become more volatile.

Section 107 of the JOBS Act also provides that anemerging growth company can take advantage of the extended transition period provided in Section 13(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, for complying with new or revised accounting standards. In otherwords, an emerging growth company can delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. However, we are choosing to “opt out” of such extended transition period and, as aresult, we will comply with new or revised accounting standards on the relevant dates on which adoption of such standards is required for non-emerging growth companies. Our decision to opt out of the extended transition period for



 

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complying with new or revised accounting standards is irrevocable. However, we intend to take advantage of the other exemptions discussed above.

We will remain an emerging growth company until the earliest of: (i) the last day of the first fiscal year in which our annual grossrevenues exceed $1.07 billion; (ii) the last day of 2024; (iii) the date that we become a “large accelerated filer” as defined in Rule 12b-2 under the Exchange Act, which wouldoccur if the market value of our common equity held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the last business day of our most recently completed second fiscal quarter; or (iv) the date on whichwe have issued more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt securities during any three-year period.

Even after we no longer qualify as an emerging growth company, we may still qualify as a “smaller reporting company,” which wouldallow us to take advantage of many of the same exemptions from disclosure requirements including reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in this prospectus and our periodic reports and proxy statements.

Corporate Information

We wereincorporated in Delaware in November 2012. Our offices are located at 2 W Liberty Blvd #100, Malvern, Pennsylvania 19355. Our telephone number is (610) 725-1500. Our corporate website iswww.galeratx.com. The information contained on or that can be accessed through our website is not incorporated by reference into this prospectus, and you should not consider information on our website to be part of this prospectus or indeciding to purchase our common stock.



 

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The Offering

 

Common stock offered by us

                      shares

Common stock to be outstanding after this offering

  

                    shares(or                     shares if the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares in full)

Option to purchase additional shares

  We have granted the underwriters a 30-day option to purchase up to                    additional shares of our common stock at the public offering price less estimated underwriting discounts andcommissions.

Use of proceeds

  We estimate that the net proceeds to us from this offering will be approximately $                     million (or approximately$                     million if the underwriters exercise in full their option to purchase additional shares of common stock), assuming aninitial public offering price of $                     per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of thisprospectus, and after deducting the estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. We intend to use the net proceeds from this offering, together with our existing cash resources, to advance theclinical development of GC4419 and GC4711 and the remainder for new and ongoing research and development activities and working capital and other general corporate purposes. See “Use of Proceeds.”

Risk factors

  Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 13 and the other information included in this prospectus for a discussion of factors you should consider carefullybefore deciding to invest in our common stock.

Proposed Nasdaq Global Market symbol

  “GRTX”

 

 

The number of shares of our common stock are based on 97,905,795 shares of common stock outstanding as of September 30, 2019, aftergiving effect to the automatic conversion of all outstanding shares of our redeemable convertible preferred stock into shares of our common stock immediately prior to the closing of this offering, and excludes:

 

  

15,670,977 shares of our common stock issuable upon the exercise of options outstanding as of September 30,2019, at a weighted-average exercise price of $0.79 per share;

 

  

2,477,856 shares of common stock reserved for future issuance pursuant to the Galera Therapeutics, Inc. EquityIncentive Plan, or the Existing Equity Incentive Plan;

 

  

                     shares of common stockreserved for future issuance pursuant to our 2019 Incentive Award Plan, or the 2019 Plan, which will become effective on the day prior to the first public trading date of our common stock; and

 

  

                     shares of common stockreserved for future issuance pursuant to our 2019 Employee Stock Purchase Plan, or the 2019 ESPP, which will become effective on the day prior to the first public trading date of our common stock.



 

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Unless otherwise indicated, this prospectus reflects and assumes the following:

 

  

a          -for-         reverse stock split of our common stock to be effected on                    , 2019;

 

  

the automatic conversion of all outstanding shares of our redeemable convertible preferred stock into 96,385,795shares of our common stock upon the closing of this offering;

 

  

the filing of our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and the effectiveness of our amended andrestated bylaws upon the closing of this offering;

 

  

no exercise of the outstanding options referred to above; and

 

  

no exercise by the underwriters of their option to purchase additional shares of our common stock.



 

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Summary Consolidated Financial Data

The following tables set forth, for the periods and as of the dates indicated, our summary historical consolidated financial data. Theconsolidated statements of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2018 are derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. The consolidated statements of operations data forthe six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2019 and the consolidated balance sheet data as of June 30, 2019 have been derived from our unaudited interim consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. In our opinion, theunaudited interim consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a basis consistent with our audited consolidated financial statements and contains all adjustments, consisting only of normal and recurring adjustments, necessary for a fairpresentation of such interim financial statements. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected in the future and our operating results for the six months ended June 30, 2019 are not necessarilyindicative of the results that may be expected for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2019 or any other interim periods or any future year or period. You should read the following information together with the more detailed information contained in“Selected Consolidated Financial Data,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

   Year ended December 31,  Six Months Ended June 30, 
   2017  2018  2018  2019 
   (in thousands, except share and per share amounts) 

Consolidated Statements of Operations Data:

     

Operating expenses:

     

Research and development

  $20,594  $18,663  $7,389  $18,017 

General and administrative

   3,500   5,592   2,601   3,650 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Loss from operations

   (24,094  (24,255  (9,990  (21,667

Other income (expenses):

     

Interest income

   193   606   53   970 

Interest expense

   —     (220  —     (1,175

Foreign currency loss

   (4  (30  (16  (35
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Loss from operations before income tax benefit

   (23,905  (23,899  (9,953  (21,907

Income tax benefit

   360   223   89   —   
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net loss

   (23,545  (23,676  (9,864  (21,907

Accretion of redeemable convertible preferred stock to redemption value

   (4,588  (5,910  (2,411  (4,071
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net loss attributable to common stockholders

  $(28,133 $(29,586 $(12,275 $(25,978
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net loss per share of common stock, basic and diluted(1)

  $(18.51 $(19.46 $(8.08 $(17.09
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Weighted-average shares of common stock outstanding, basic and diluted(1)

   1,520,000   1,520,000   1,520,000   1,520,000 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Pro forma net loss per share of common stock, basic and diluted (unaudited)(1)

   $(0.31  $(0.22
   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Pro forma weighted-average shares of common stock outstanding, basic and diluted(unaudited)(1)

    76,977,463    97,905,795 
   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(1)

See Note 2 to our audited consolidated financial statements and Note 2 to our unaudited interimconsolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus for an explanation of the method used to calculate our historical and pro forma basic and diluted net loss per share of common stock.



 

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   As of June 30, 2019 
   Actual  Pro Forma(1)   Pro Forma As
Adjusted(2)(3)
 
      

(unaudited)

(in thousands)

   (unaudited) 

Consolidated Balance Sheet Data:

     

Cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments

  $81,277  $81,277   $                    

Working capital(4)

   75,596   75,596   

Total assets

   91,043   91,043   

Royalty purchase liability

   41,395   41,395   

Redeemable convertible preferred stock

   169,973   —     

Total stockholders’ (deficit) equity

   (129,656  40,317   

 

(1)

Reflects the automatic conversion of all outstanding shares of our redeemable convertible preferred stock intoan aggregate of 96,385,795 shares of common stock upon the closing of this offering.

 

(2)

Reflects the pro forma adjustments described in footnote (1) and the sale by usof                    shares of common stock in this offering at the assumed initial public offering price of$                    per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, after deducting estimatedunderwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us.

 

(3)

Pro forma as adjusted information is illustrative only and will change based on the actual initial publicoffering price and other terms of this offering determined at pricing. Each $1.00 increase or decrease in the assumed initial public offering price of$                    per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, would increase or decreasepro forma as adjusted cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments, working capital, total assets and total stockholders’ (deficit) equity by approximately$                    million, assuming that the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, remains the same,and after deducting estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. A 1,000,000 share increase or decrease in the number of shares offered by us would increase or decrease pro forma as adjusted cash,cash equivalents and short-term investments, working capital, total assets and total stockholders’ (deficit) equity by approximately$                    million, assuming that the assumed initial price to public remains the same, and after deducting estimated underwritingdiscounts and commissions payable by us.

 

(4)

We define working capital as current assets less current liabilities.



 

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RISKFACTORS

Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the risks described below, aswell as the other information in this prospectus, including our consolidated financial statements and the related notes and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” before decidingwhether to invest in our common stock. The occurrence of any of the events or developments described below could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and growth prospects. In such an event, the market price ofour common stock could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial also may impair our business operations.

Risks Related to Our Financial Position and Capital Needs

We are a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company with a limited operating history and have not generated any revenue from product sales. We haveincurred significant operating losses since our inception and anticipate that we will incur continued losses for the foreseeable future.

We have incurred losses in each year since our inception in 2012 and anticipate incurring losses for the foreseeable future. To date, we haveinvested substantially all of our efforts and financial resources in identifying, acquiring, in-licensing and developing our product candidates, including commencing and conducting clinical trials andproviding general and administrative support for these operations. Our future success is dependent on our ability to develop, obtain regulatory approval for and successfully commercialize one or more of our product candidates. We have not yetdemonstrated our ability to successfully complete any Phase 3 or other pivotal clinical trials, obtain regulatory approvals, manufacture a drug at commercial scale, or conduct sales and marketing activities. We currently generate no revenuefrom sales of any products, and we may never be able to develop or commercialize a marketable product. Biopharmaceutical product development is a highly speculative undertaking and involves a substantial degree of risk. Typically, it takes manyyears to develop one new drug from the time it is discovered to when it is available for treating patients, and development may cease for a number of reasons.

We have incurred significant losses related to expenses for research and development and our ongoing operations. Our net losses for the yearsended December 31, 2017 and 2018 were $23.5 million and $23.7 million, respectively, and $21.9 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019. As of June 30, 2019, we had an accumulated deficit of $129.7 million. We expect tocontinue to incur losses for the foreseeable future, and we anticipate these losses will increase substantially as we:

 

  

continue our research and pre-clinical and clinical development of ourproduct candidates, including our ongoing Phase 3 registrational trial for GC4419 for the reduction in the incidence of SOM in patients with locally advanced HNC receiving radiotherapy and our ongoing Phase 1b/2a pilot trial of GC4419 inpatients with LAPC receiving SBRT, and commence our Phase 2a trial of GC4419 for the reduction in the incidence of esophagitis in patients with lung cancer receiving radiotherapy and our Phase 1b/2a trial of GC4711 in patients with NSCLCreceiving radiotherapy;

 

  

advance our programs into more expensive clinical trials;

 

  

increase our manufacturing needs or add additional manufacturers or suppliers;

 

  

seek regulatory and marketing approvals for our product candidates that successfully complete clinical trials, ifany;

 

  

establish a sales, marketing and distribution infrastructure to commercialize any products for which we mayobtain marketing approval;

 

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seek to identify, assess, acquire or develop additional product candidates;

 

  

make royalty or other payments under any royalty or purchase agreements, including our Royalty Agreement withClarus;

 

  

seek to maintain, protect and expand our intellectual property portfolio;

 

  

seek to attract and retain skilled personnel;

 

  

create additional infrastructure to support our operations as a public company, our product development and ourplanned future commercialization efforts; and

 

  

experience any delays or encounter issues with any of the above, including but not limited to failed trials,complex results, safety issues, other regulatory challenges that require longer follow-up of existing trials, additional major trials or additional supportive trials in order to pursue marketing approval.

To become and remain profitable, we must succeed in developing and eventually commercializing product candidates thatgenerate significant revenue. This will require us to be successful in a range of challenging activities, including completing pre-clinical studies and clinical trials of our product candidates, obtainingregulatory approval, and manufacturing, marketing and selling any product candidates for which we may obtain regulatory approval, as well as discovering and developing additional product candidates. We are only in the preliminary stages of most ofthese activities. We may never succeed in these activities and, even if we do, may never generate revenue that is significant enough to achieve profitability.

In cases where we are successful in obtaining regulatory approval to market one or more of our product candidates, our revenue will bedependent, in part, upon the size of the markets in the territories for which we gain regulatory approval, the accepted price for the product, the ability to obtain coverage and reimbursement, and whether we own the commercial rights for thatterritory. If the number of our addressable patients is not as significant as we estimate, the indication approved by regulatory authorities is narrower than we expect, or the treatment population is narrowed by competition, physician choice ortreatment guidelines, we may not generate significant revenue from sales of such products, even if approved.

Because of the numerousrisks and uncertainties associated with product development, we are unable to accurately predict the timing or amount of expenses or when, or if, we will be able to achieve profitability. If we are required by regulatory authorities to performstudies in addition to those expected, or if there are any delays in the initiation and completion of our clinical trials or the development of any of our product candidates, our expenses could increase.

Further, the net losses we incur may fluctuate significantly fromquarter-to-quarter and year-to-year, such that a period to period comparison of ourresults of operations may not be a good indication of our future performance. Once we are a public company, we will incur additional costs associated with operating as a public company. Even if we achieve profitability in the future, we may not beable to sustain profitability in subsequent periods. Our prior losses, combined with expected future losses, have had and will continue to have an adverse effect on our stockholders’ equity and working capital.

Even if this offering is successful, we may need substantial additional funding to meet our financial obligations and to pursue our business objective.If we are unable to raise capital when needed, we could be forced to curtail our planned operations and the pursuit of our growth strategy.

Identifying potential product candidates and conducting pre-clinical studies and clinical trials is atime-consuming, expensive and uncertain process that takes years to complete, and we may never generate the

 

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necessary data or results required to obtain regulatory approval and achieve product sales. We expect our expenses to increase in connection with our ongoing activities as we continue enrollingpatients in and complete our Phase 3 registrational trial of GC4419 for the reduction in the incidence of SOM in patients with locally advanced HNC, seek marketing approval for GC4419, pursue clinical trials and marketing approval of GC4419 inother indications, pursue clinical trials and marketing approval of GC4711 and advance any of our other product candidates we may develop or otherwise acquire. In addition, if we obtain marketing approval for any of our product candidates, we expectto incur significant commercialization expenses related to manufacturing, product sales, marketing and distribution. We may also need to raise additional funds sooner if we choose to pursue additional indications for our product candidates orotherwise expand more rapidly than we presently anticipate. Furthermore, upon the closing of this offering, we expect to incur additional costs associated with operating as a public company. Accordingly, we will need to obtain substantial additionalfunding in connection with our continuing operations. If we are unable to raise capital when needed on attractive terms, if at all, we will be forced to delay, reduce or eliminate certain of our clinical development plans, research and developmentprograms or future commercialization efforts.

The development process for our product candidates is highly uncertain, and we cannotestimate with certainty the actual amounts necessary to successfully complete the development, regulatory approval process and commercialization of our product candidates. Based on our current operating plan, we believe that the net proceeds fromthis offering and our current cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments will be sufficient to enable us to fund our operating expenses and capital expenditure requirementsinto                . Our operating plans may change as a result of many factors currently unknown to us, and we may need to seek additional funds sooner than expected,through public or private equity, debt financings or other sources. Our future capital requirements will depend on and could increase significantly as a result of many factors, including:

 

  

the results, time and cost necessary for completing our Phase 3 registrational trial for GC4419 for thereduction in the incidence of SOM in patients with locally advanced HNC receiving radiotherapy and our ongoing Phase 1b/2a pilot trial of GC4419 in patients with LAPC receiving SBRT, and commencing our planned Phase 2a trial of GC4419 forthe reduction in the incidence of esophagitis in patients with lung cancer receiving radiotherapy and our planned Phase 1b/2a trial of GC4711 in patients with NSCLC receiving radiotherapy;

 

  

the number, size and type of any additional clinical trials;

 

  

the costs, timing and outcomes of seeking and potentially obtaining approvals from the FDA or comparable foreignregulatory authorities, such as the European Medicines Agency, or EMA, or the Competent Authorities of the Member States of the European Economic Area, or EEA, including the potential for the FDA or comparable regulatory authorities to require thatwe conduct more studies and trials than those that we currently expect to conduct and the costs of post-marketing studies or risk evaluation and mitigation strategies, or REMS, that could be required by regulatory authorities;

 

  

the costs and timing of transferring manufacturing technology to third-party manufacturers, producing productcandidates to support clinical trials and preparing to manufacture our product candidates;

 

  

our ability to successfully commercialize any of our product candidates, including the cost and timing of formingand expanding our sales organization and marketing capabilities;

 

  

the amount of sales revenues from our product candidates, if approved, including the sales price and theavailability of coverage and adequate third-party reimbursement;

 

  

competitive and potentially competitive products and technologies and patients’ receptivity to our productcandidates and the technology underlying them in light of competitive products and technologies;

 

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the cash requirements of any future acquisitions, developments or discovery of additional product candidates,including any licensing or collaboration agreements;

 

  

the time and cost necessary to respond to technological and market developments;

 

  

the costs of filing, prosecuting, defending and enforcing any patent claims and other intellectual propertyrights;

 

  

any product liability or other lawsuits related to our product candidates or any products;

 

  

the costs associated with being a public company;

 

  

our need and ability to hire additional personnel; and

 

  

the receptivity of the capital markets to financings by biotechnology companies generally and companies withproduct candidates and technologies such as ours specifically.

Any additional fundraising efforts may divert ourmanagement from their day-to-day activities, which may adversely affect our ability to develop and commercialize our product candidates. Dislocations in the financialmarkets may make equity and debt financing more difficult to obtain, and may have a material adverse effect on our ability to meet our fundraising needs when they arise. Additional funds may not be available when we need them, on terms that areacceptable to us, or at all. If we are unable to obtain funding on a timely basis, we may be required to significantly curtail, delay or discontinue one or more of our pre-clinical studies, clinical trials orother research or development programs, the commercialization of any product candidate. We may also be unable to expand our operations or otherwise capitalize on our business opportunities or may be required to relinquish rights to our productcandidates or products. Any of these occurrences could materially affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Raisingadditional capital may cause dilution to our stockholders, including purchasers of shares of our common stock in this offering, restrict our operations or require us to relinquish rights to our technologies or product candidates.

Until such time as we can generate substantial product revenues, if ever, we expect to finance our cash needs through securities offerings ordebt financings, or possibly, license and collaboration agreements or research grants. The terms of any financing may adversely affect the holdings or the rights of our stockholders and our issuance of additional securities, whether equity or debt,or the possibility of such issuance, may cause the market price of our common stock to decline. The sale of additional equity or convertible securities would dilute all of our stockholders, including your ownership interest. The incurrence ofindebtedness would result in increased fixed or variable payment obligations and we may be required to agree to certain restrictive covenants, such as limitations on our ability to incur additional debt, limitations on our ability to acquire, sellor license intellectual property rights and other operating restrictions that could adversely impact our ability to conduct our business. We could also be required to seek funds through arrangements with collaborators or otherwise at an earlierstage than otherwise would be desirable and we may be required to relinquish rights to some of our technologies, product candidates or future revenue streams, or otherwise agree to terms unfavorable to us, any of which may have a material adverseeffect on our business, operating results and prospects. If we raise funds through research grants, we may be subject to certain requirements, which may limit our ability to use the funds or require us to share information from our research anddevelopment. Raising additional capital through any of these or other means could adversely affect our business and the holdings or rights of our stockholders, and may cause the market price of our shares to decline.

 

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Risks Related to the Discovery and Development of Our Product Candidates

We are heavily dependent on the success of our lead product candidate, GC4419, and if GC4419 does not successfully complete clinical development orreceive regulatory approval, our business may be harmed.

We currently have no products that are approved for commercial sale. Wehave not completed the development of any product candidates and we may never be able to develop marketable products. We expect that a substantial portion of our efforts and expenditures over the next few years will be devoted to the advancement ofGC4419, through clinical trials and the regulatory approval process, as well as the commercialization of GC4419 following regulatory approval, if received. Accordingly, our business currently depends heavily on the successful completion of ourPhase 3 Reduction in Oral Mucositis with Avasopasem Manganese Trial, or ROMAN Trial, and subsequent regulatory approval and commercialization of GC4419.

We cannot be certain that GC4419 will receive regulatory approval, or be successfully commercialized even if we receive regulatory approval.The research, testing, manufacturing, labeling, approval, sale, marketing and distribution of products are, and will remain, subject to extensive regulation by the FDA and other regulatory authorities in the United States and other countries thateach have differing regulations. We are not permitted to market GC4419 in the United States until we receive approval of a New Drug Application, or NDA, or in any foreign country until we receive the requisite approvals from the appropriateauthorities in such countries for marketing authorization.

We have not yet demonstrated our ability to complete later-stage or pivotalclinical trials, and there can be no assurance that our Phase 3 ROMAN Trial of GC4419 will produce results sufficient for us to submit an NDA or differentiate our product from currently available treatment options for the reduction of SOM inpatients with HNC. For example, as a result of the appearance of trace amounts of visible fine particles identified through stability testing of our GC4419 drug product, our two INDs for GC4419 were temporarily placed on clinical hold in May andJuly 2019, respectively, following our April 2019 decision to voluntarily suspend dosing of GC4419 in all active clinical trials until we identified the root cause and resolved the issue. We have since identified the particles as manganesecarbonate, determined that the particles do not present safety or efficacy concerns for patients who may already have been dosed and are modifying the manufacturing process to minimize formation of the particles. Accordingly, the FDA lifted theclinical holds in August 2019. Additionally, drug and placebo will now be filtered before administration to clinical trial subjects. There can be no assurance that we will be able to eliminate or minimize the formation of particles such as manganesecarbonate or that a similar or different manufacturing issue will not occur and one or more of our programs will not be placed on clinical hold in the future.

As a result of the clinical hold on our ROMAN trial, the data from the 30 patients in the trial that did not complete dosing with GC4419during the time the trial was on clinical hold will not be considered for purposes of our efficacy analysis in the trial. However, the data from these patients will be considered for purposes of evaluating the safety of GC4419 in our ROMAN trial.Following the lifting of the clinical hold, we increased the size of our ROMAN trial from 335 patients to 365 patients.

In addition, ourPhase 3 ROMAN Trial may not demonstrate a statistically significant difference for the active 90 mg dose compared to placebo for the primary endpoint. Any failure to demonstrate a statistically significant difference compared to placebowould adversely impact the potential for regulatory approval, if any, of GC4419 in the United States. Furthermore, even if the statistical difference compared to placebo is achieved for the primary endpoint, we may not be able to demonstratesuch differences for our secondary endpoints. As such, even if we were able to obtain approval for GC4419, these key secondary endpoints would not be mentioned in the U.S. label, which could potentially adversely affect product differentiation.

We have not submitted an NDA for GC4419 or any other marketing authorizing application for any other product candidates to the FDA or anycomparable application to any other regulatory authority. Obtaining approval of an NDA or similar regulatory approval is an extensive, lengthy, expensive and inherently uncertain

 

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process, and the FDA or other foreign regulatory authorities may delay, limit or deny approval of any of our current or future product candidates for many reasons, including:

 

  

we may not be able to demonstrate that GC4419 is effective as treatments for any of our targeted indications tothe satisfaction of the FDA or other relevant regulatory authorities;

 

  

the relevant regulatory authorities may requireadditional pre-approval studies or clinical trials, which would increase our costs and prolong our development timelines;

 

  

the results of our clinical trials may not meet the level of statistical or clinical significance required by theFDA or other relevant regulatory authorities for marketing approval;

 

  

the FDA or other relevant regulatory authorities may disagree with the number, design, size, conduct orimplementation of our clinical trials;

 

  

the contract research organizations, or CROs, that we retain to conduct clinical trials may take actions outsideof our control, or otherwise commit errors or breaches of protocols, that materially adversely impact our clinical trials and ability to obtain market approvals;

 

  

the FDA or other relevant regulatory authorities may not find the data from pre-clinical studies or clinicaltrials sufficient to demonstrate that the clinical and other benefits of GC4419 outweigh their safety risks;

 

  

the FDA or other relevant regulatory authorities may not be convinced that GC4419 has an acceptable safetyprofile;

 

  

the FDA or other relevant regulatory authorities may disagree with our interpretation of data or significance ofresults from the pre-clinical studies and clinical trials of GC4419, or may require that we conduct additional studies;

 

  

the FDA or other relevant regulatory authorities may not accept data generated from our clinical trial sites;

 

  

if our NDA or other foreign application is reviewed by an advisory committee, the FDA or other relevantregulatory authority, as the case may be, may have difficulties scheduling an advisory committee meeting in a timely manner or the advisory committee may recommend against approval of our application or may recommend that the FDA or other relevantregulatory authority, as the case may be, require, as a condition of approval, additional nonclinical studies or clinical trials, limitations on approved labeling or distribution and use restrictions;

 

  

the FDA or other relevant regulatory authorities may require additional post-marketing studies, which would becostly;

 

  

the FDA or other relevant regulatory authorities may identify deficiencies in the manufacturing processes orfacilities of our third-party manufacturers; and

 

  

the FDA or other relevant regulatory authorities may change their approval policies or adopt new regulations.

Clinical drug development involves a lengthy and expensive process with uncertain timelines and outcomes, and results of earlierstudies and trials may not be predictive of future trial results. If development of our product candidates is unsuccessful or delayed, we may be unable to obtain required regulatory approvals and be unable to commercialize our product candidates ona timely basis, if at all.

Clinical testing is expensive and can take many years to complete, and its outcome is inherentlyuncertain. Failure or delay can occur at any time during the clinical trial process. Success in pre-clinical studies and early clinical trials does not ensure that later clinical trials will be successful. Anumber of companies in the pharmaceutical industry, including biotechnology companies, have suffered significant setbacks in clinical trials, even after promising results in earlier pre-clinical studies orclinical trials. These setbacks have been caused by, among other things, pre-clinical findings made while clinical trials were underway and safety or efficacy

 

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observations made in clinical trials, including previously unreported adverse events. The results of pre-clinical studies and clinical trials of ourproduct candidates may not be predictive of the results of later-stage clinical trials. Product candidates in later stages of clinical trials may fail to show the desired safety and efficacy traits despite having progressed through pre-clinical studies and initial clinical trials. Notwithstanding any potential promising results in earlier studies, we cannot be certain that we will not face similar setbacks. Even if our clinical trials arecompleted, the results may not be sufficient to obtain regulatory approval for our product candidates.

In addition, interim, topline andpreliminary data, such as the interim data on our pilot Phase 1b/2a trial of GC4419 in combination with SBRT in patients with LAPC, that we announce or publish from time to time may change as more patient data become available, and are subject toaudit and verification procedures that could result in material changes in the final data. We may make assumptions, estimations, calculations and conclusions as part of our analyses of data, and we may not have received or had the opportunity tofully and carefully evaluate all data. As a result, the topline results that we report may differ from future results of the same studies, or different conclusions or considerations may qualify such results, once additional data have been receivedand fully evaluated. Interim, topline, and preliminary data should be viewed with caution until final data are available. Further, others, including regulatory agencies, may not accept or agree with our assumptions, estimates, calculations,conclusions or analyses or may interpret or weigh the importance of data differently, which could impact the value of the particular program, the approvability or commercialization of the particular product candidate or product and our company ingeneral.

Furthermore, we rely on CROs and clinical trial sites to ensure the proper and timely conduct of our clinical trials. While wehave agreements with our CROs governing their committed activities, and the ability to audit their performance, we have limited influence over their actual performance. We rely on third-party vendors, such as CROs, scientists and collaborators toprovide us with significant data and other information related to our pre-clinical studies or clinical trials and our business. If such third parties provide inaccurate, misleading or incomplete data, ourbusiness, prospects and results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

We may experience delays in initiating our clinicaltrials and we cannot be certain that the trials or any other future clinical trials for our product candidates will begin on time, need to be redesigned, enroll an adequate number of patients on time or be completed on schedule, if at all. Clinicaltrials can be delayed or terminated for a variety of reasons, including delay or failure related to:

 

  

the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities, such as the Competent Authorities of the Member States ofthe EEA, disagreeing as to the design or implementation of our clinical trials;

 

  

the size of the study population for further analysis of the study’s primary endpoints;

 

  

obtaining regulatory approval to commence a trial;

 

  

reaching agreement on acceptable terms with prospective CROs and clinical trial sites, the terms of which can besubject to extensive negotiation and may vary significantly among different CROs and trial sites;

 

  

obtaining institutional review board, or IRB, or Ethics Committee approval at each site;

 

  

recruiting suitable patients to participate in a trial;

 

  

having patients complete a trial or return for post-treatment follow-up;

 

  

clinical sites deviating from trial protocol or dropping out of a trial;

 

  

addressing patient safety concerns that arise during the course of a trial;

 

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addressing any conflicts with new or existing laws or regulations;

 

  

adding a sufficient number of clinical trial sites; or

 

  

manufacturing sufficient quantities of product candidate for use in clinical trials.

We could also encounter delays if a clinical trial is suspended or terminated by us, by the IRBs or Ethics Committees of the institutions inwhich such trials are being conducted, by the Data Safety Monitoring Board, or DSMB, for such trial or by the FDA or other regulatory authorities, such as the Competent Authorities of the Member States of the EEA. Such authorities may suspend orterminate a clinical trial due to a number of factors, including failure to conduct the clinical trial in accordance with regulatory requirements or our clinical protocols, inspection of the clinical trial operations or trial site by the FDA orother regulatory authorities, such as the Competent Authorities of the Member States of the EEA, resulting in the imposition of a clinical hold, unforeseen safety issues or adverse side effects, failure to demonstrate a benefit from using a drug,changes in governmental regulations or administrative actions or lack of adequate funding to continue the clinical trial.

Further,conducting clinical trials in foreign countries, as we plan to do for our product candidates, presents additional risks that may delay completion of our clinical trials. These risks include the failure of enrolled patients in foreign countries toadhere to clinical protocol as a result of differences in healthcare services or cultural customs, managing additional administrative burdens associated with foreign regulatory schemes, as well as political and economic risks relevant to suchforeign countries.

If we experience delays in the completion, or termination, of any clinical trial of our product candidates, thecommercial prospects of our product candidates may be harmed, and our ability to generate product revenues from any of these product candidates will be delayed or not realized at all. In addition, any delays in completing our clinical trials willincrease our costs, slow down our product candidate development and approval process and jeopardize our ability to commence product sales and generate revenues. Any of these occurrences may significantly harm our business, financial condition andprospects. In addition, many of the factors that cause, or lead to, a delay in the commencement or completion of clinical trials may also ultimately lead to the denial of regulatory approval of our product candidates.

If we encounter difficulties or delays enrolling patients in our clinical trials, our clinical development activities could be delayed or otherwiseadversely affected.

The timely completion of clinical trials in accordance with their protocols depends, among other things, onour ability to enroll a sufficient number of patients who remain in the study until its conclusion. We may experience difficulties in patient enrollment in our clinical trials for a variety of reasons. The enrollment of patients depends on manyfactors, including:

 

  

the patient eligibility criteria defined in the protocol;

 

  

the size of the patient population required for analysis of the trial’s primary endpoints;

 

  

the proximity of patients to study sites;

 

  

the design of the trial;

 

  

our ability to recruit clinical trial investigators with the appropriate competencies and experience;

 

  

clinicians’ and patients’ perceptions as to the potential advantages of the product candidate beingstudied in relation to other available therapies, including any new drugs that may be approved for the indications we are investigating;

 

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our ability to obtain and maintain patient consents; and

 

  

the risk that patients enrolled in clinical trials will drop out of the trials before completion.

In addition, our clinical trials will compete with other clinical trials for product candidates that are in the sametherapeutic areas as our product candidates, and this competition will reduce the number and types of patients available to us, because some patients who might have opted to enroll in our trials may instead opt to enroll in a trial being conductedby one of our competitors. Since the number of qualified clinical investigators is limited, we expect to conduct some of our clinical trials at the same clinical trial sites that some of our competitors use, which will reduce the number of patientswho are available for our clinical trials in such clinical trial site.

Delays in patient enrollment may result in increased costs or mayaffect the timing or outcome of the planned clinical trials, which could prevent completion of these trials and adversely affect our ability to advance the development of our product candidates.

Success in pre-clinical studies or earlier clinical trials may not be indicative of results in future clinicaltrials.

Success in pre-clinical studies and early clinical trials does not ensure thatlater clinical trials will generate the same results or otherwise provide adequate data to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of a product candidate. Pre-clinical studies and Phase 1 and Phase 2 clinicaltrials are primarily designed to test safety, to study pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and to understand the side effects of product candidates at various doses and schedules. Success in pre-clinicalstudies and early clinical trials does not ensure that later, large-scale efficacy trials will be successful nor does it predict final results. Our product candidates may fail to show the desired safety and efficacy in clinical development despitepositive results in pre-clinical studies or having successfully advanced through initial clinical trials.

In addition, the design of a clinical trial can determine whether its results will support approval of a product, and flaws in the design of aclinical trial may not become apparent until the clinical trial is well advanced. As an organization, we have limited experience designing clinical trials and may be unable to design and execute a clinical trial to support regulatory approval. Manycompanies in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries have suffered significant setbacks in late-stage clinical trials even after achieving promising results in pre-clinical studies and earlier-stageclinical trials. Data obtained from pre-clinical and clinical activities are subject to varying interpretations, which may delay, limit or prevent regulatory approval. In addition, we may experience regulatorydelays or rejections as a result of many factors, including changes in regulatory policy during the period of our product candidate development. Any such delays could negatively impact our business, financial condition, results of operations andprospects.

We plan to conduct clinical trials for our product candidates outside the United States and the FDA may not accept data from suchtrials.

We have conducted certain of our clinical trials outside the United States, and we plan to conduct additional clinicaltrials outside the United States. For example, we are currently conducting a Phase 1 dose escalation study of GC4711 in healthy volunteers in Australia. Although the FDA may accept data from clinical trials conducted outside the United States,acceptance of such study data by the FDA is subject to certain conditions. For example, the clinical trial must be conducted in accordance with good clinical practices, or GCP, requirements and the FDA must be able to validate the data from theclinical trial through an onsite inspection if it deems such inspection necessary.

Where data from foreign clinical trials are intendedto serve as the sole basis for marketing approval in the United States, the FDA will not approve the application on the basis of foreign data alone unless those data are applicable to the U.S. population and U.S. medical practice, the clinicaltrials were performed by clinical investigators of recognized competence, and the data are considered valid without the need for an on-site

 

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inspection by the FDA or, if the FDA considers such an inspection to be necessary, the FDA is able to validate the data through an on-site inspection orother appropriate means. In addition, such clinical trials would be subject to the applicable local laws of the foreign jurisdictions where the clinical trials are conducted.

There can be no assurance the FDA will accept data from clinical trials conducted outside of the United States. There can also be no assurancethat the comparable foreign regulatory authority in any jurisdiction in which we seek marketing approval for our product candidates will accept data from clinical trials conducted outside such jurisdiction. If the FDA or any such foreign regulatoryauthority does not accept any such data, it would likely result in the need for additional clinical trials, which would be costly and time-consuming and delay aspects of our development plan. In addition, the conduct of clinical trials outside theUnited States could have a significant impact on us. Risks inherent in conducting international clinical trials include:

 

  

foreign regulatory requirements that could burden or limit our ability to conduct our clinical trials;

 

  

administrative burdens of conducting clinical trials under multiple foreign regulatory schemes;

 

  

foreign exchange fluctuations;

 

  

manufacturing, customs, shipment and storage requirements;

 

  

cultural differences in medical practice and clinical research; and

 

  

diminished protection of intellectual property in some countries.

Our product candidates may cause undesirable side effects or have other properties that could delay or prevent their regulatory approval, cause us tosuspend or discontinue clinical trials, limit the commercial profile of an approved label, or result in significant negative consequences following marketing approval, if any.

Undesirable side effects caused by our product candidates could cause us or regulatory authorities to interrupt, delay or halt clinical trialsand could result in a more restrictive label or the delay or denial of regulatory approval by the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities, such as the EMA or the Competent Authorities of the Member States of the EEA. Results of our clinicaltrials could reveal a high and unacceptable severity and prevalence of side effects or unexpected characteristics. To date, patients treated with our product candidates have experienced drug-related side effects including lymphopenia, nausea,fatigue, oropharyngeal pain, constipation, radiation skin injury and vomiting.

If unacceptable side effects arise in the development ofour product candidates, we, the FDA, the IRBs or Ethics Committees at the institutions in which our studies are conducted, or the DSMB could suspend or terminate our clinical trials or the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities could orderus to cease clinical trials or deny approval of our product candidates for any or all targeted indications. Treatment-related side effects could also affect patient recruitment or the ability of enrolled patients to complete the trial or result inpotential product liability claims. In addition, these side effects may not be appropriately recognized or managed by the treating medical staff. We expect to have to train medical personnel using our product candidates to understand the side effectprofiles for our clinical trials and upon any commercialization of any of our product candidates. Inadequate training in recognizing or managing the potential side effects of our product candidates could result in patient injury or death. Any ofthese occurrences may harm our business, financial condition and prospects significantly.

Our clinical trials include cancer patients whoare very sick and whose health may deteriorate, and we expect that additional clinical trials of our other product candidates will include similar patients with potentially deteriorating health. It is possible that some may die during our clinicaltrials for various reasons, including because the patient’s underlying disease continues to advance despite treatment, or because the patient

 

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experiences medical problems that may not be related to our product candidate. For example, during our Phase 2b trial of GC4419, there was onenon-treatment-related death in each of the placebo, 30 mg treatment and 90 mg treatment arms. Even if the deaths are not related to our product candidate, the deaths could affect perceptionsregarding the safety of our product candidates.

In addition, if any of our product candidates receives marketing approval, and we orothers later identify undesirable side effects caused by such products, a number of potentially significant negative consequences could result, including:

 

  

regulatory authorities may suspend, withdraw or limit their approval of the product, or seek an injunctionagainst its manufacture or distribution;

 

  

we may be required to recall a product or change the way such product is administered to patients;

 

  

additional restrictions may be imposed on the marketing of the particular product or the manufacturing processesfor the product or any component thereof;

 

  

regulatory authorities may require the addition of labeling statements, such as a “black box” warningor a contraindication, or issue safety alerts, Dear Healthcare Provider letters, press releases or other communications containing warnings or other safety information about the product;

 

  

we may be required to implement a REMS or create a Medication Guide outlining the risks of such side effects fordistribution to patients, or implement other changes to how a product is distributed or administered;

 

  

we may be subject to fines, injunctions or the imposition of civil or criminal penalties;

 

  

we could be sued and held liable for harm caused to patients;

 

  

the product may become less competitive; and

 

  

our reputation may suffer.

Any of the foregoing events could prevent us from achieving or maintaining market acceptance of the particular product candidate, if approved,and result in the loss of significant revenues to us, which would materially and adversely affect our results of operations and business.

Theregulatory approval process is lengthy, expensive and uncertain, and we may be unable to obtain regulatory approval for our product candidates under applicable regulatory requirements. The denial or delay of any such approval would delaycommercialization of our product candidates and adversely impact our ability to generate revenue, our business and our results of operations.

The development, research, testing, manufacturing, labeling, approval, selling, import, export, marketing, promotion and distribution of drugproducts are subject to extensive and evolving regulation by federal, state and local governmental authorities in the United States, principally the FDA, and by foreign regulatory authorities, such as the EMA or the Competent Authorities of theMember States of the EEA, which regulations differ from country to country. Neither we nor any future collaborator is permitted to market any of our product candidates in the United States until we receive regulatory approval of an NDA from the FDA.

Obtaining regulatory approval of an NDA can be a lengthy, expensive and uncertain process. Prior to obtaining approval to commercialize aproduct candidate in the United States or abroad, we or our collaborators must demonstrate with substantial evidence from well-controlled clinical trials, and to the satisfaction of the FDA

 

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or other foreign regulatory agencies, that such product candidates are safe and effective for their intended uses. The number of pre-clinical studies andclinical trials that will be required for FDA approval varies depending on the product candidate, the disease or condition that the product candidate is designed to address, and the regulations applicable to any particular product candidate.

Results from pre-clinical studies and clinical trials can be interpreted in different ways. Even if webelieve the pre-clinical or clinical data for our product candidates are promising, such data may not be sufficient to support approval by the FDA and other regulatory authorities. Administering productcandidates to humans may produce undesirable side effects, which could interrupt, delay or halt clinical trials and result in the FDA or other regulatory authorities denying approval of a drug candidate for any or all indications. The FDA may alsorequire us to conduct additional studies or trials for our product candidates either prior to or post-approval, such as additional drug-drug interaction studies or safety or efficacy studies or trials, or it may object to elements of our clinicaldevelopment program such as the number of subjects in our current clinical trials from the United States. We may experience difficulty in identifying and enrolling patients in such a trial, if one were to be required, which could interrupt, delay orhalt the process of obtaining regulatory approval of GC4419.

The FDA or any foreign regulatory bodies can delay, limit or deny approvalof our product candidates or require us to conduct additional pre-clinical studies or clinical testing or abandon a program for many reasons, including:

 

  

the FDA or the applicable foreign regulatory agency’s disagreement with the design or implementation of ourclinical trials;

 

  

negative or ambiguous results from our clinical trials or results that may not meet the level of statisticalsignificance required by the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory agencies for approval;

 

  

serious and unexpected drug-related side effects experienced by participants in our clinical trials or byindividuals using drugs similar to our product candidates;

 

  

our inability to demonstrate to the satisfaction of the FDA or the applicable foreign regulatory body that ourproduct candidates are safe and effective for the proposed indication;

 

  

the FDA’s or the applicable foreign regulatory agency’s disagreement with the interpretation of datafrom pre-clinical studies or clinical trials;

 

  

our inability to demonstrate the clinical and other benefits of our product candidates outweigh any safety orother perceived risks;

 

  

the FDA’s or the applicable foreign regulatory agency’s requirement for additional pre-clinical studies or clinical trials;

 

  

the FDA’s or the applicable foreign regulatory agency’s disagreement regarding the formulation,labeling and/or the specifications of our product candidates;

 

  

the FDA’s or the applicable foreign regulatory agency’s failure to approve the manufacturing processesor facilities of third-party manufacturers with which we contract; or

 

  

the potential for approval policies or regulations of the FDA or the applicable foreign regulatory agencies tosignificantly change in a manner rendering our clinical data insufficient for approval.

Of the large number of drugs indevelopment, only a small percentage successfully complete the FDA or other regulatory approval processes and are commercialized. The lengthy approval process as well as the

 

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unpredictability of future clinical trial results may result in our failing to obtain regulatory approval to market our product candidates, which would significantly harm our business, financialcondition, results of operations and prospects.

Even if we eventually complete clinical testing and receive approval of an NDA or foreignmarketing application for our product candidates, the FDA or the applicable foreign regulatory agency may grant approval contingent on the performance of costly additional clinical trials, including Phase 4 clinical trials, and/or in the case of theFDA, the implementation of a REMS, which may be required to ensure safe use of the drug after approval. The FDA or the applicable foreign regulatory agency also may approve a product candidate for a more limited indication or a narrower patientpopulation than we originally requested, and the FDA or applicable foreign regulatory agency may not approve the labeling that we believe is necessary or desirable for the successful commercialization of a product candidate. Any delay in obtaining,or inability to obtain, applicable regulatory approval would delay or prevent commercialization of that product candidate and would materially adversely impact our business and prospects.

Changes in methods of product candidate manufacturing or formulation may result in additional costs or delay.

As product candidates proceed through pre-clinical studies to late-stage clinical trials towardspotential approval and commercialization, it is common that various aspects of the development program, such as manufacturing methods and formulation, are altered along the way in an effort to optimize processes and results. Such changes carry therisk that they will not achieve these intended objectives. Any of these changes could cause our product candidates to perform differently and affect the results of planned clinical trials or other future clinical trials conducted with the alteredmaterials. Such changes may also require additional testing, FDA notification or FDA approval. This could delay completion of clinical trials, require the conduct of bridging clinical trials or the repetition of one or more clinical trials, increaseclinical trial costs, delay approval of our product candidates and jeopardize our ability to commence sales and generate revenue.

Forexample, in an effort to optimize scale-up efficiencies for GC4419, we implemented certain changes to the manufacturing process related to the order of addition of ingredients. However, this manufacturing change inadvertently led to the appearanceof trace amounts of visible fine particles in the drug product. Following notification to the FDA in April 2019 that we had voluntarily suspended dosing of GC4419 in all active clinical trials until we were able to resolve the issue, our INDs forGC4419 were temporarily placed on clinical hold. While we have now resolved the issue by modifying the manufacturing process and the FDA lifted the clinical holds in August 2019, there can be no assurance that a similar or different manufacturingissue will not occur and one or more of our programs will not be placed on clinical hold in the future.

We may expend our limited resources topursue a particular product candidate or indication and fail to capitalize on product candidates or indications that may be more profitable or for which there is a greater likelihood of success.

Because we have limited financial and management resources, we focus on development programs and product candidates that we identify forspecific indications. As such, we are currently primarily focused on the development of GC4419 and GC4711. As a result, we may forego or delay pursuit of opportunities with other product candidates or for other indications for GC4419 or GC4711 thatlater prove to have greater commercial potential. Our resource allocation decisions may cause us to fail to capitalize on viable commercial products or profitable market opportunities. Our spending on current and future development programs andproduct candidates for specific indications may not yield any commercially viable products. If we do not accurately evaluate the commercial potential or target market for a particular product candidate, we may relinquish valuable rights to thatproduct candidate through collaboration, licensing or other royalty arrangements in cases in which it would have been more advantageous for us to retain sole development and commercialization rights to such product candidate.

 

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While we have received Breakthrough Therapy Designation for GC4419, we may not receive suchdesignation for our other product candidates, and such designation for GC4419 or any other product candidate may not lead to a faster development or regulatory review or approval process and will not increase the likelihood that our productcandidates will receive marketing approval.

We have received Breakthrough Therapy Designation from the FDA for GC4419 for thereduction of the duration, incidence and severity of SOM induced by radiotherapy, with or without systemic therapy. We may also seek Breakthrough Therapy Designation for any other product candidates that we may develop. A breakthrough therapyis defined as a product that is intended, alone or in combination with one or more other drugs, to treat a serious or life-threatening disease or condition, and preliminary clinical evidence indicates that the product may demonstrate substantialimprovement over existing therapies on one or more clinically significant endpoints. For product candidates that have been designated as breakthrough therapies, interaction and communication between the FDA and the sponsor of the trial can help toidentify the most efficient path for clinical development while minimizing the number of patients placed in ineffective control regimens. Designation as a breakthrough therapy is within the discretion of the FDA. Accordingly, even if we believe thata product candidate meets the criteria for designation as a breakthrough therapy, the FDA may disagree and instead determine not to make such designation. In any event, the receipt of Breakthrough Therapy Designation for a product candidate may notresult in a faster development process, review or approval compared to products considered for approval under conventional FDA procedures and does not assure ultimate approval by the FDA. In addition, even if one or more product candidates qualifyas breakthrough therapies, the FDA may later decide that the products no longer meet the conditions for qualification.

We have received Fast TrackDesignation for GC4419, and we may seek such designation for some or all of our other product candidates. We may not receive such designation, and even for those product candidates for which we do, it may not lead to a faster development orregulatory review or approval process, and will not increase the likelihood that product candidates will receive marketing approval.

We have received Fast Track Designation from the FDA for GC4419 for the reduction of the severity and incidence of radiation andchemotherapy-induced OM, and we may seek Fast Track Designation and review for some or all of our other product candidates. If a drug is intended for the treatment of a serious or life-threatening condition or disease, and pre-clinical or clinical data demonstrate the potential to address an unmet medical need, the product may qualify for Fast Track Designation, for which sponsors must apply. The FDA has broad discretion whether ornot to grant this designation. Thus, even if we believe a particular product candidate is eligible for this designation, the FDA may decide not to grant it. Moreover, even if we do receive Fast Track Designation, we or our collaborators may notexperience a faster development process, review or approval compared to conventional FDA procedures. In addition, the FDA may withdraw Fast Track Designation if it believes that the designation is no longer supported by data from our clinicaldevelopment program.

Obtaining and maintaining regulatory approval of our product candidates in one jurisdiction does not mean that we will besuccessful in obtaining regulatory approval of our product candidates in other jurisdictions.

Obtaining and maintainingregulatory approval of our product candidates in one jurisdiction does not guarantee that we will be able to obtain or maintain regulatory approval in any other jurisdiction, while a failure or delay in obtaining regulatory approval in onejurisdiction may have a negative effect on the regulatory approval process in others. For example, even if the FDA grants marketing approval of a product candidate, comparable regulatory authorities in foreign jurisdictions, such as the EMA or theCompetent Authorities of the Member States of the EEA, must also approve the manufacturing, marketing and promotion of the product candidate in those countries. Approval procedures vary among jurisdictions and can involve requirements andadministrative review periods different from, and greater than, those in the United States, including additional pre-clinical studies or clinical trials, as studies conducted in one jurisdiction may not beaccepted by regulatory authorities in other jurisdictions. In many jurisdictions outside the United States, a product candidate must be approved for reimbursement before it can be approved for sale in that jurisdiction. In some cases, the price thatwe intend to charge for our products is also subject to approval.

 

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Obtaining foreign regulatory approvals and compliance with foreign regulatory requirementscould result in significant delays, difficulties and costs for us and could delay or prevent the introduction of our products in certain countries. If we fail to comply with the regulatory requirements in international markets and/or receiveapplicable marketing approvals, our target market size will be reduced and our ability to realize the full market potential of our product candidates will be harmed.

Additionally, on June 23, 2016, the electorate in the United Kingdom voted in favor of leaving the European Union, commonly referred toas Brexit. On March 29, 2017, the country formally notified the European Union of its intention to withdraw pursuant to Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty. Since a significant proportion of the regulatory framework in the United Kingdom isderived from European Union directives and regulations, the referendum could materially impact the regulatory regime with respect to the approval of our product candidates in the United Kingdom or the European Union. Any delay in obtaining, or aninability to obtain, any marketing approvals, as a result of Brexit or otherwise, would prevent us from commercializing our product candidates in the United Kingdom and/or the European Union and restrict our ability to generate revenue and achieveand sustain profitability. If any of these outcomes occur, we may be forced to restrict or delay efforts to seek regulatory approval in the United Kingdom and/or European Union for our product candidates, which could significantly and materiallyharm our business.

Even if we receive regulatory approval of our product candidates, we will be subject to ongoing regulatory obligations andcontinued regulatory review, which may result in significant additional expense, and we may be subject to penalties if we fail to comply with regulatory requirements or experience unanticipated problems with our product candidates.

Any regulatory approvals that we receive for our product candidates may be subject to limitations on the approved indicated uses for which theproduct may be marketed or the conditions of approval, or contain requirements for potentially costly post-market testing and surveillance to monitor the safety and efficacy of the product candidate. The FDA may also require a REMS as a condition ofapproval of our product candidates, which could include requirements for a medication guide, physician communication plans or additional elements to ensure safe use, such as restricted distribution methods, patient registries and other riskminimization tools. In addition, if the FDA or a comparable foreign regulatory authority approves our product candidates, the manufacturing processes, labeling, packaging, distribution, adverse event reporting, storage, advertising, promotion,import, export and recordkeeping for our product candidates will be subject to extensive and ongoing regulatory requirements. These requirements include submissions of safety and other post-marketing information and reports, registration, as well ascontinued compliance with current good manufacturing practice-grade, or cGMP, requirements and GCP requirements for any clinical trials that we conduct post-approval. Later discovery of previously unknown problems with our product candidates,including adverse events of unanticipated severity or frequency, or with our third-party manufacturers or manufacturing processes, or failure to comply with regulatory requirements, may result in, among other things:

 

  

restrictions on the marketing or manufacturing of our product candidates, withdrawal of the product from themarket, or voluntary or mandatory product recalls;

 

  

fines, warning or untitled letters or holds on clinical trials;

 

  

refusal by the FDA to approve pending applications or supplements to approved applications filed by us orsuspension or revocation of approvals;

 

  

product seizure or detention, or refusal to permit the import or export of our product candidates; and

 

  

injunctions or the imposition of civil or criminal penalties.

Any government investigation of alleged violations of law could require us to expend significant time and resources in response, and couldgenerate negative publicity. Any failure to comply with ongoing regulatory

 

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requirements may significantly and adversely affect our ability to commercialize and generate revenue from our products. If regulatory sanctions are applied or if regulatory approval iswithdrawn, the value of our company and our operating results will be adversely affected.

The FDA’s and other regulatoryauthorities’ policies may change and additional government regulations may be enacted that could prevent, limit or delay regulatory approval of our product candidates. We cannot predict the likelihood, nature or extent of government regulationthat may arise from future legislation or administrative action, either in the United States or abroad. For example, certain policies of the Trump administration may impact our business and industry. Namely, the Trump administration has takenseveral executive actions, including the issuance of a number of Executive Orders, that could impose significant burdens on, or otherwise materially delay, FDA’s ability to engage in routine oversight activities such as implementing statutesthrough rulemaking, issuance of guidance, and review and approval of marketing applications. It is difficult to predict how these executive actions will be implemented, and the extent to which they will impact the FDA’s ability to exercise itsregulatory authority. If these executive actions impose restrictions on FDA’s ability to engage in oversight and implementation activities in the normal course, our business may be negatively impacted. If we are slow or unable to adapt tochanges in existing requirements or the adoption of new requirements or policies, or if we are not able to maintain regulatory compliance, we may lose any marketing approval that we may have obtained and we may not achieve or sustain profitability.

Changes in funding for the FDA and other government agencies could hinder their ability to hire and retain key leadership and otherpersonnel, or otherwise prevent new products and services from being developed or commercialized in a timely manner, which could negatively impact our business.

The ability of the FDA to review and approve new products can be affected by a variety of factors, including government budget andfunding levels, ability to hire and retain key personnel and accept the payment of user fees, and statutory, regulatory, and policy changes. Average review times at the agency have fluctuated in recent years as a result. In addition, governmentfunding of other government agencies that fund research and development activities is subject to the political process, which is inherently fluid and unpredictable.

Disruptions at the FDA and other agencies may also slow the time necessary for new drugs to be reviewed and/or approved by necessarygovernment agencies, which would adversely affect our business. For example, over the last several years, including for 35 days beginning on December 22, 2018, the U.S. government has shut down several times and certain regulatoryagencies, such as the FDA, have had to furlough critical FDA employees and stop critical activities. If a prolonged government shutdown occurs, it could significantly impact the ability of the FDA to timely review andprocess our regulatory submissions, which could have a material adverse effect on our business.

The FDA and other regulatory agencies activelyenforce the laws and regulations prohibiting the promotion of off-label uses. If we are found or alleged to have improperly promoted off-label uses, we may becomesubject to significant liability.

The FDA and other regulatory agencies strictly regulate the promotional claims that may be madeabout prescription products, as our product candidates would be, if approved. In particular, a product may not be promoted for uses that are not approved by the FDA or such other regulatory agencies as reflected in the product’s approvedlabeling. Physicians may nevertheless prescribe such drugs to their patients in a manner that is inconsistent with the approved label. For example, if we obtain approval for GC4419 for the reduction in the incidence of SOM in patientswith locally advanced HNC receiving radiotherapy, we may pursue a strategy for GC4419 for the reduction of radiotherapy-induced esophagitis by presenting clinical data to entities like the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, or NCCN, to supportuse of GC4419 under these circumstances as a medically accepted indication in published drug compendia, notwithstanding the fact that we may not seek approval for GC4419 for radiotherapy-induced esophagitis by the FDA. Even if we are successful inobtaining Category 1 or Category 2A status from NCCN for GC4419 for the reduction of esophagitis, we will nevertheless

 

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be restricted from marketing and promoting the product for the reduction of esophagitis unless and until it is approved by the FDA for such indication.

If we are found to have promoted off-label uses, or if the government takes the position that ourpresenting clinical data related to off-label uses of GC4419 to NCCN or other drug compendia publishers to establish compendia-listed indications constitutes off-labelpromotion, we may become subject to significant liability. The federal government has levied large civil and criminal fines against companies for alleged improper promotion and has enjoined several companies from engaging in off-label promotion. The FDA has also requested that companies enter into consent decrees or permanent injunctions under which specified promotional conduct is changed or curtailed. If we cannot successfully managethe promotion of our product candidates, if approved, we could become subject to significant liability, which would materially adversely affect our business and financial condition.

Risks Related to Our Dependence on Third Parties

We rely, and will continue to rely, on third parties to conduct our clinical trials for our product candidates, and those third parties may not performsatisfactorily, including failing to meet deadlines for the completion of such trials.

We have engaged a CRO to conduct ourongoing Phase 3 registrational trial for GC4419 for the reduction in the incidence of SOM in patients with locally advanced HNC receiving radiotherapy and our ongoing Phase 1b/2a pilot trial of GC4419 in patients with LAPC, and expect toengage a CRO for future clinical trials of GC4419, GC4711 and any other product candidates that we may progress to clinical development. We expect to continue to rely on third parties, such as clinical data management organizations, medicalinstitutions and clinical investigators, to conduct those clinical trials. If any of our relationships with these third parties terminate, we may not be able to timely enter into arrangements with alternative third parties or to do so oncommercially reasonable terms, if at all. In addition, any third parties conducting our clinical trials will not be our employees, and except for remedies available to us under our agreements with such third parties, we cannot control whether or notthey devote sufficient time and resources to our clinical programs. If these third parties do not successfully carry out their contractual duties or obligations or meet expected deadlines, if they need to be replaced or if the quality or accuracy ofthe clinical data they obtain is compromised due to the failure to adhere to our clinical protocols, regulatory requirements or for other reasons, our clinical trials may be extended, delayed or terminated and we may not be able to obtain regulatoryapproval for or successfully commercialize our product candidates. Consequently, our results of operations and the commercial prospects for our product candidates would be harmed, our costs could increase substantially and our ability to generaterevenue could be delayed significantly.

Switching or adding CROs involves substantial cost and requires management time and focus. Inaddition, there is a natural transition period when a new CRO commences work. As a result, delays occur, which can materially impact our ability to meet our desired clinical development timelines. Though we intend to carefully manage ourrelationships with our CROs, there can be no assurance that we will not encounter challenges or delays in the future or that these delays or challenges will not have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and prospects.

We rely on these parties for execution of our pre-clinical studies and clinical trials, and generallydo not control their activities. Our reliance on these third parties for research and development activities will reduce our control over these activities but will not relieve us of our responsibilities. For example, we will remain responsible forensuring that each of our clinical trials is conducted in accordance with the general investigational plan and protocols for the trial. Moreover, the FDA requires us to comply with GCPs for conducting, recording and reporting the results of clinicaltrials to assure that data and reported results are credible and accurate and that the rights, integrity and confidentiality of trial participants are protected. We are also required to register ongoing clinical trials and post the results ofcompleted clinical trials on a government-sponsored database, ClinicalTrials.gov, within specified timeframes. Failure to do so can result in fines, adverse publicity and civil

 

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and criminal sanctions. If we or any of our CROs or other third parties, including trial sites, fails to comply with applicable GCPs, the clinical data generated in our clinical trials may bedeemed unreliable and the FDA, EMA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities may require us to perform additional clinical trials before approving our marketing applications. We cannot assure you that upon inspection by a given regulatoryauthority, such regulatory authority will determine that any of our clinical trials complies with GCP regulations. In addition, our clinical trials must be conducted with product produced under cGMP conditions. Our failure to comply with theseregulations may require us to repeat clinical trials, which would delay the regulatory approval process.

In addition, principalinvestigators for our clinical trials may serve as scientific advisors or consultants to us from time to time and receive compensation in connection with such services. Under certain circumstances, we may be required to report some of theserelationships to the FDA. The FDA may conclude that a financial relationship between us and a principal investigator has created a conflict of interest or otherwise affected interpretation of the trial. The FDA may therefore question the integrityof the data generated at the applicable clinical trial site and the utility of the clinical trial itself may be jeopardized. This could result in a delay in approval, or rejection, of our marketing applications by the FDA and may ultimately lead tothe denial of marketing approval of GC4419, GC4711 and any other product candidates.

We also expect to rely on other third parties tostore and distribute product supplies for our clinical trials. Any performance failure on the part of our distributors could delay clinical development or marketing approval of our product candidates or commercialization of our products, producingadditional losses and depriving us of potential revenue.

We contract with third parties for the manufacture and supply of our product candidatesfor pre-clinical and clinical testing and expect to continue to do so for commercialization. This reliance on third parties increases the risk that we will not have sufficient quantities of our productcandidates or such quantities at an acceptable cost, which could delay, prevent or impair our development or commercialization efforts.

We do not have any manufacturing facilities or personnel. We do not have any long-term contractual arrangements with manufacturers and insteadrely on third parties to manufacture our product candidates on a purchase-order or work-order basis. We currently have limited manufacturing arrangements, and we cannot be certain that we will be able to establish redundancy in manufacturers for ourproduct candidates, which could lead to reliance on a limited number of manufacturers for one or more of our product candidates. This reliance increases the risk that we will not have sufficient quantities of our drug candidates or products, ifapproved, or such quantities at an acceptable cost or quality, which could delay, prevent or impair our development or commercialization efforts.

We also expect to rely on third-party manufacturers or third-party collaborators for the manufacture of commercial supply of GC4419 and anyother product candidates for which we obtain marketing approval. The facilities used by our contract manufacturing organizations, or CMOs, to manufacture our product candidates must be approved by the FDA or other regulatory authorities pursuant toinspections that will be conducted after we submit our NDA or comparable marketing application to the FDA or other regulatory authority. We do not have control over a supplier’s or manufacturer’s compliance with laws, regulations andapplicable cGMP standards and other laws and regulations, such as those related to environmental health and safety matters. If our CMOs cannot successfully manufacture material that conforms to our specifications and the strict regulatoryrequirements of the FDA or others, they will not be able to secure and maintain regulatory approval for their manufacturing facilities. In addition, we have no control over the ability of our CMOs to maintain adequate quality control, qualityassurance and qualified personnel. If the FDA or a comparable foreign regulatory authority does not approve these facilities for the manufacture of our product candidates or if it withdraws any such approval in the future, we may need to findalternative manufacturing facilities, which would significantly impact our ability to develop, obtain regulatory approval for or market our product candidates, if approved. If our current or future suppliers are unable to supply us with sufficientraw materials for our pre-clinical studies and clinical trials, we may experience delays in our development efforts as we locate and qualify new raw material manufacturers.

 

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We may be unable to establish any agreements with future third-party manufacturers or to doso on acceptable terms. Even if we are able to establish agreements with third-party manufacturers, qualifying and validating such manufacturers may take a significant period of time and reliance on third-party manufacturers entails additionalrisks, including:

 

  

reliance on the third party for regulatory compliance and quality assurance;

 

  

the possible breach of the manufacturing agreement by the third party;

 

  

the possible misappropriation of our proprietary information, including our trade secrets and know-how;

 

  

the possible increase in costs for the raw materials or drug substance in GC4419 or any of our other productcandidates; and

 

  

the possible termination or nonrenewal of any agreement by any third party at a time that is costly orinconvenient for us.

Third-party manufacturers may not be able to comply with cGMP regulations or other regulatoryrequirements outside the United States. Our failure, or the failure of our third-party manufacturers, to comply with applicable regulations could result in sanctions being imposed on us, including clinical holds, fines, injunctions, civil penalties,delays, suspension or withdrawal of approvals, license revocation, seizures or recalls of product candidates or drugs, operating restrictions and criminal prosecutions, any of which could significantly and adversely affect supplies of our products.

Our product candidates and any drugs that we may develop may compete with other product candidates and drugs for access to manufacturingfacilities. There are no assurances we would be able to enter into similar commercial arrangements with other manufacturers that operate under cGMP regulations and that might be capable of manufacturing for us. Any performance failure on the part ofour existing or future manufacturers could delay clinical development or marketing approval.

We may seek collaborations with third parties for thedevelopment or commercialization of our product candidates. If those collaborations are not successful, we may not be able to capitalize on the market potential of these product candidates.

We may seek third-party collaborators for the development and commercialization of our product candidates, including for the commercializationof any of our product candidates that are approved for marketing outside the United States. Our likely collaborators for any collaboration arrangements include large and mid-size pharmaceutical companies,regional and national pharmaceutical companies and biotechnology companies. If we do enter into any such arrangements with any third parties, we will likely have limited control over the amount and timing of resources that our collaborators dedicateto the development or commercialization of our product candidates. Our ability to generate revenue from these arrangements will depend on our collaborators’ abilities to successfully perform the functions assigned to them in these arrangements.

Collaborations involving our product candidates would pose the following risks to us:

 

  

collaborators have significant discretion in determining the efforts and resources that they will apply to thesecollaborations;

 

  

collaborators may not perform their obligations as expected, including compliance with all applicable regulatoryrequirements;

 

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collaborators may not pursue development and commercialization of any product candidates that achieve regulatoryapproval or may elect not to continue or renew development or commercialization programs based on clinical trial results, changes in the collaborators’ strategic focus or available funding, or external factors, such as an acquisition, thatdivert resources or create competing priorities;

 

  

collaborators may delay clinical trials, provide insufficient funding for a clinical trial program, stop aclinical trial or abandon a product candidate, repeat or conduct new clinical trials or require a new formulation of a product candidate for clinical testing;

 

  

collaborators could independently develop, or develop with third parties, products that compete directly orindirectly with our product candidates if the collaborators believe that competitive products are more likely to be successfully developed or can be commercialized under terms that are more economically attractive than ours;

 

  

product candidates discovered in collaboration with us may be viewed by our collaborators as competitive withtheir own product candidates or drugs, which may cause collaborators to cease to devote resources to the commercialization of our product candidates;

 

  

a collaborator with marketing and distribution rights to one or more of our product candidates that achieveregulatory approval may not commit sufficient resources to the marketing and distribution of such products;

 

  

disagreements with collaborators, including disagreements over proprietary rights, contract interpretation or thepreferred course of development, might cause delays or termination of the research, development or commercialization of product candidates, might lead to additional responsibilities for us with respect to product candidates, or might result inlitigation or arbitration, any of which would be time-consuming and expensive;

 

  

collaborators may not properly maintain or defend our or their intellectual property rights or may use our ortheir proprietary information in such a way as to invite litigation that could jeopardize or invalidate such intellectual property or proprietary information or expose us to potential litigation;

 

  

collaborators may infringe the intellectual property rights of third parties, which may expose us to litigationand potential liability; and

 

  

collaborations may be terminated for the convenience of the collaborator and, if terminated, we could be requiredto raise additional capital to pursue further development or commercialization of the applicable product candidates.

Collaboration agreements may not lead to development or commercialization of product candidates in the most efficient manner or at all. If apresent or future collaborator of ours were to be involved in a business combination, the continued pursuit and emphasis on our product development or commercialization program could be delayed, diminished or terminated.

If we seek, but are not able to establish, collaborations, we may have to alter our development and commercialization plans.

Our product development programs and the potential commercialization of our product candidates will require substantial additional capital.For some of our product candidates, we may decide to collaborate with pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies for the development and potential commercialization of those product candidates.

 

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We face significant competition in seeking appropriate collaborators. Whether we reach adefinitive agreement for a collaboration will depend, among other things, upon our assessment of the collaborator’s resources and expertise, the terms and conditions of the proposed collaboration and the proposed collaborator’s evaluationof a number of factors. Those factors may include the design or results of clinical trials, the likelihood of approval by the FDA or comparable regulatory authorities outside the United States, the potential market for the subject product candidate,the costs and complexities of manufacturing and delivering such product candidate to patients, the potential of competing products, the existence of uncertainty with respect to our ownership of technology, which can exist if there is a challenge tosuch ownership without regard to the merits of the challenge and industry and market conditions generally. The collaborator may also consider alternative product candidates or technologies for similar indications that may be available to collaborateon and whether such a collaboration could be more attractive than the one with us for our product candidate. Collaborations are complex and time-consuming to negotiate and document. In addition, there have been a significant number of recentbusiness combinations among large pharmaceutical companies that have resulted in a reduced number of potential future collaborators.

Wemay not be able to negotiate collaborations on a timely basis, on acceptable terms, or at all. If we are unable to do so, we may have to curtail the development of such product candidate, reduce or delay its development program or one or more of ourother development programs, delay its potential commercialization or reduce the scope of any sales or marketing activities, or increase our expenditures and undertake development or commercialization activities at our own expense. If we elect toincrease our expenditures to fund development or commercialization activities on our own, we may need to obtain additional capital, which may not be available to us on acceptable terms or at all. If we do not have sufficient funds, we may not beable to further develop our product candidates or bring them to market and generate revenue.

Risks Related to Commercialization

Even if any of our product candidates receives marketing approval, it may fail to achieve the degree of market acceptance by physicians,patients, third-party payors and others in the medical community necessary for commercial success.

If any of our productcandidates receives marketing approval, it may nonetheless fail to gain sufficient market acceptance by physicians, patients, third-party payors and others in the medical community. If our product candidates do not achieve an adequate level ofacceptance, we may not generate significant revenue and we may not become profitable. The degree of market acceptance of our product candidates, if approved for commercial sale, will depend on a number of factors, including:

 

  

the timing of market introduction;

 

  

the efficacy, safety and potential advantages compared to alternative treatments, including for GC4419;

 

  

our ability to offer our products for sale at competitive prices;

 

  

the willingness of the target patient population to try new treatments and of physicians to prescribe thesetreatments;

 

  

the perception by members of the healthcare community, including physicians or patients, that the process ofadministering our product candidates, including our intravenous infusion procedure, is not unduly cumbersome;

 

  

the clinical indications for which our product candidates are approved;

 

  

product labeling or product insert requirements of the FDA or other regulatory authorities;

 

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limitations or warnings contained in the labeling approved by the FDA or other regulatory authorities;

 

  

the limited number of infusion sites where our product candidates can be administered;

 

  

our ability to successfully develop, or make arrangements with third-party manufacturers for, commercialmanufacturing processes for any of our product candidates that receive regulatory approval;

 

  

our ability to hire and retain a sales force in the United States;

 

  

the strength of marketing and distribution support;

 

  

the recognition of uses for our products as medically accepted indications in recognized drug compendia;

 

  

the availability of third-party coverage and adequate reimbursement for GC4419 and any other potential productcandidates;

 

  

the prevalence and severity of any side effects; and

 

  

any restrictions on the use of our products together with other medications.

If we are unable to establish our own sales, marketing and distribution capabilities, or enter into agreements with third parties to sell and marketGC4419 or any other product candidates, we may not be successful in commercializing our product candidates if and when they are approved, and we may not be able to generate any revenue.

We do not currently have a sales, marketing or distribution infrastructure. We have never sold, marketed or distributed any therapeuticproducts. To achieve commercial success for any approved product candidate, we will need to establish a sales and marketing organization. Under the Royalty Agreement with Clarus, we are required to establish a trained sales force sufficiently inadvance of any anticipated commercial launch in a country where we seek to commercialize GC4419 or related product candidates. We expect to build a specialized sales and marketing organization of approximately 40 sales representatives to market ourproduct candidates to the approximately 4,000 radiation oncologists in the United States. There are risks involved with establishing our own sales and marketing capabilities. For example, recruiting and training a sales force is expensive and timeconsuming and could delay any drug launch. If the commercial launch of a product candidate for which we recruit a sales force and establish marketing capabilities is delayed or does not occur for any reason, we would have prematurely orunnecessarily incurred these commercialization expenses. This may be costly, and our investment would be lost if we cannot retain or reposition our sales and marketing personnel.

Factors that may inhibit our efforts to commercialize our product candidates on our own include:

 

  

our inability to recruit and retain adequate numbers of effective sales and marketing personnel;

 

  

the inability of sales personnel to obtain access to physicians or persuade adequate numbers of physicians toprescribe any future products;

 

  

our inability to equip medical and sales personnel with effective materials, including medical and salesliterature to help them educate physicians and other healthcare providers regarding applicable diseases and our future products;

 

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the lack of complementary products to be offered by sales personnel, which may put us at a competitivedisadvantage relative to companies with more extensive product lines;

 

  

our inability to develop or obtain sufficient operational functions to support our commercial activities; and

 

  

unforeseen costs and expenses associated with creating an independent sales and marketing organization.

If we are unable to establish our own sales, marketing and distribution capabilities and are forced to enter intoarrangements with, and rely on, third parties to perform these services, our revenue and our profitability, if any, are likely to be lower than if we had developed such capabilities ourselves. In addition, we may not be successful in entering intoarrangements with third parties to sell, market and distribute our product candidates or may be unable to do so on terms that are favorable to us. We likely will have little control over such third parties, and any of them may fail to devote thenecessary resources and attention to sell and market our products effectively. If we do not establish sales, marketing and distribution capabilities successfully, either on our own or in collaboration with third parties, we will not be successful incommercializing our product candidates.

The incidence and prevalence for target patient populations of our product candidates have not beenestablished with precision. If the market opportunities for our product candidates are smaller than we estimate, or if any approval that we obtain is based on a narrower definition of the patient population, our revenue and ability to achieveprofitability may be materially adversely affected.

The precise incidence and prevalence for all the conditions we aim to addresswith our programs are unknown and cannot be precisely determined. Our projections of both the number of people who have these diseases, as well as the subset of people with these diseases who have the potential to benefit from treatment with ourproduct candidates, are based on beliefs and estimates. These estimates have been derived from a variety of sources, including the scientific literature, surveys of clinics, patient foundations or market research, and may prove to be incorrect.Further, new trials may change the estimated incidence or prevalence of these diseases.

The total addressable market across all of ourproduct candidates will ultimately depend upon, among other things, the diagnosis criteria included in the final label for each of our product candidates approved for sale for these indications, acceptance by the medical community and patientaccess, drug pricing and reimbursement. The number of patients in the United States and other major markets and elsewhere may turn out to be lower than expected, patients may not be otherwise amenable to treatment with our products or new patientsmay become increasingly difficult to identify or gain access to, all of which would adversely affect our results of operations and our business. Further, even if we obtain significant market share for our product candidates, because the potentialtarget populations are very small, we may never achieve profitability despite obtaining such significant market share.

The successfulcommercialization of GC4419 or any other product candidates will depend in part on the extent to which governmental authorities and health insurers establish coverage, adequate reimbursement levels and pricing policies. Failure to obtain or maintaincoverage and adequate reimbursement for our product candidates, if approved, could limit our ability to market those products and decrease our ability to generate revenue.

The availability of coverage and adequacy of reimbursement by governmental healthcare programs such as Medicare and Medicaid, private healthinsurers and other third-party payors are essential for most patients to be able to afford medical services and pharmaceutical products such as our product candidates, assuming FDA approval. Our ability to achieve acceptable levels of coverage andreimbursement for our products or procedures using our products by governmental authorities, private health insurers and other organizations will have an

 

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effect on our ability to successfully commercialize our product candidates. Obtaining coverage and adequate reimbursement for our products may be particularly difficult because of the higherprices often associated with drugs administered under the supervision of a physician. Separate reimbursement for the product itself or the treatment or procedure in which our product is used may not be available. A decision by a third-party payornot to cover or separately reimburse for our products or procedures using our products, could reduce physician utilization of our products once approved. Assuming there is coverage for our product candidates or procedures using our productcandidates by a third-party payor, the resulting reimbursement payment rates may not be adequate or may require co-payments that patients find unacceptably high. We cannot be sure that coverage andreimbursement in the United States, the European Union or elsewhere will be available for our product candidates or any product that we may develop, and any reimbursement that may become available may not be adequate or may be decreased oreliminated in the future.

Third-party payors increasingly are challenging prices charged for pharmaceutical products and services, andmany third-party payors may refuse to provide coverage and reimbursement for particular drugs when an equivalent generic drug, biosimilar or a less expensive therapy is available. It is possible that a third-party payor may consider our productcandidates as substitutable and only offer to reimburse patients for the less expensive product. Even if we show improved efficacy or improved convenience of administration with our product candidates, pricing of existing third-party therapeuticsmay limit the amount we will be able to charge for our product candidates. These payors may deny or revoke the reimbursement status of a given product or establish prices for new or existing marketed products at levels that are too low to enable usto realize an appropriate return on our investment in our product candidates. If reimbursement is not available or is available only at limited levels, we may not be able to successfully commercialize our product candidates, and may not be able toobtain a satisfactory financial return on our product candidates.

There is significant uncertainty related to the insurance coverage andreimbursement of newly-approved products. In the United States, third-party payors, including private and governmental payors, such as the Medicare and Medicaid programs, play an important role in determining the extent to which new drugs will becovered. The Medicare and Medicaid programs increasingly are used as models in the United States for how private payors and other governmental payors develop their coverage and reimbursement policies for drugs. Some third-party payors may require pre-approval of coverage for new or innovative devices or drug therapies before they will reimburse healthcare providers who use such therapies. We cannot predict at this time what third-party payors will decidewith respect to the coverage and reimbursement for our product candidates.

No uniform policy for coverage and reimbursement for productsexists among third-party payors in the United States. Therefore, coverage and reimbursement for products can differ significantly from payor to payor. As a result, the coverage determination process is often a time-consuming and costly process thatwill require us to provide scientific and clinical support for the use of our product candidates to each payor separately, with no assurance that coverage and adequate reimbursement will be applied consistently or obtained in the first instance.Furthermore, rules and regulations regarding reimbursement change frequently, in some cases on short notice, and we believe that changes in these rules and regulations are likely.

Outside the United States, international operations are generally subject to extensive governmental price controls and other marketregulations, and we believe the increasing emphasis on cost-containment initiatives in Europe and other countries have and will continue to put pressure on the pricing and usage of our product candidates. In many countries, the prices of medicalproducts are subject to varying price control mechanisms as part of national health systems. Other countries allow companies to fix their own prices for medical products, but monitor and control company profits. Additional foreign price controls orother changes in pricing regulation could restrict the amount that we are able to charge for our product candidates. Accordingly, in markets outside the United States, the reimbursement for our product candidates may be reduced compared with theUnited States and may be insufficient to generate commercially-reasonable revenue and profits.

Moreover, increasing efforts bygovernmental and third-party payors in the United States and abroad to cap or reduce healthcare costs may cause such organizations to limit both coverage and the level of

 

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reimbursement for newly approved products and, as a result, they may not cover or provide adequate payment for our product candidates. We expect to experience pricing pressures in connection withthe sale of our product candidates due to the trend toward managed health care, the increasing influence of health maintenance organizations and additional legislative changes. The downward pressure on healthcare costs in general, particularlyprescription drugs and surgical procedures and other treatments, has become intense. As a result, increasingly high barriers are being erected to the entry of new products.

Enacted and future healthcare legislation may increase the difficulty and cost for us to obtain marketing approval of and commercialize our productcandidates and may affect the prices we may set.

In the United States, the European Union and other jurisdictions, there havebeen, and we expect there will continue to be, a number of legislative and regulatory changes and proposed changes to the healthcare system that could affect our future results of operations. In particular, there have been and continue to be anumber of initiatives at the U.S. federal and state levels that seek to reduce healthcare costs and improve the quality of healthcare. For example, in March 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care andEducation Reconciliation Act, or collectively the Affordable Care Act, was enacted, which substantially changed the way healthcare is financed by both governmental and private insurers. Among the provisions of the Affordable Care Act, those ofgreatest importance to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries include the following:

 

  

an annual, non-deductible fee payable by any entity that manufactures orimports certain branded prescription drugs (other than those designated as orphan drugs), which is apportioned among these entities according to their market share in certain government healthcare programs;

 

  

new requirements to report certain financial arrangements with physicians and teaching hospitals, includingreporting “transfers of value” made or distributed to prescribers and other healthcare providers and reporting investment interests held by physicians and their immediate family members;

 

  

a new methodology by which rebates owed by manufacturers under the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program are calculatedfor drugs that are inhaled, infused, instilled, implanted or injected;

 

  

expansion of eligibility criteria for Medicaid programs by, among other things, allowing states to offer Medicaidcoverage to certain individuals with income at or below 133% of the federal poverty level, thereby potentially increasing a manufacturer’s Medicaid rebate liability;

 

  

a new Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to oversee, identify priorities in, and conduct comparativeclinical effectiveness research, along with funding for such research; and

 

  

establishment of a Center for Medicare Innovation at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, orCMS, to test innovative payment and service delivery models to lower Medicare and Medicaid spending, potentially including prescription drug spending.

Since its enactment, there have been judicial and Congressional challenges to certain aspects of the Affordable Care Act, and we expect therewill be additional challenges and amendments to the Affordable Care Act in the future. For example, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, or the Tax Act, was enacted, which includes a provision repealing, effective January 1, 2019, the tax-based shared responsibility payment imposed by the Affordable Care Act on certain individuals who fail to maintain qualifying health coverage for all or part of a year that is commonly referred to as the“individual mandate”. On December 14, 2018, a U.S. District Court Judge in the Northern District of Texas, ruled that the individual mandate is a critical and inseverable feature of the Affordable Care Act, and therefore, because itwas repealed as part of the Tax Act, the remaining provisions of the Affordable Care Act are invalid as well. While the Trump administration and CMS have both stated that

 

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the ruling will have no immediate effect, it is unclear how this decision, and subsequent appeals, if any, and will impact the Affordable Care Act. Additionally, the current Trump administrationand Congress will likely continue to seek to modify, repeal, or otherwise invalidate all, or certain provisions of, the Affordable Care Act. It is uncertain the extent to which any such changes may impact our business or financial condition.

In addition, other legislative changes have been proposed and adopted in the United States since the Affordable Care Act was enacted. Forexample, the Budget Control Act of 2011, among other things, led to aggregate reductions of Medicare payments to providers of 2% per fiscal year, which went into effect in April 2013 and, due to subsequent legislative amendments to the statute willremain in effect through 2027 unless additional action is taken by Congress; and the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012, which, among other things, further reduced Medicare payments to several types of providers, including hospitals, imagingcenters and cancer treatment centers, and increased the statute of limitations period for the government to recover overpayments to providers from three to five years. These new laws or any other similar laws introduced in the future may result inadditional reductions in Medicare and other health care funding, which could negatively affect our customers and accordingly, our financial operations.

Moreover, payment methodologies may be subject to changes in healthcare legislation and regulatory initiatives. For example, CMS may developnew payment and delivery models, such as bundled payment models. In addition, recently there has been heightened governmental scrutiny over the manner in which manufacturers set prices for their marketed products, which has resulted in several U.S.Congressional inquiries and proposed and enacted federal legislation designed to, among other things, bring more transparency to drug pricing, reduce the cost of prescription drugs under Medicare, and review the relationship between pricing andmanufacturer patient programs. Individual states in the United States have also increasingly passed legislation and implemented regulations designed to control pharmaceutical product pricing, including price or patient reimbursement constraints,discounts, restrictions on certain product access and marketing cost disclosure and transparency measures, and, in some cases, designed to encourage importation from other countries and bulk purchasing. In addition, regional healthcare authoritiesand individual hospitals are increasingly using bidding procedures to determine what pharmaceutical products and which suppliers will be included in their prescription drug and other healthcare programs. This could reduce the ultimate demand for ourproduct candidates or put pressure on our product pricing. We expect that additional U.S. healthcare reform measures will be adopted in the future, any of which could limit the amounts paid for healthcare products and services, which could result inreduced demand for our product candidates or additional pricing pressures.

In the European Union, similar political, economic andregulatory developments may affect our ability to profitably commercialize our product candidates, if approved. In addition to continuing pressure on prices and cost containment measures, legislative developments at the EU or member state level mayresult in significant additional requirements or obstacles that may increase our operating costs. The delivery of healthcare in the European Union, including the establishment and operation of health services and the pricing and reimbursement ofmedicines, is almost exclusively a matter for national, rather than European Union, law and policy. National governments and health service providers have different priorities and approaches to the delivery of health care and the pricing andreimbursement of products in that context. In general, however, the healthcare budgetary constraints in most EU member states have resulted in restrictions on the pricing and reimbursement of medicines by relevant health service providers. Coupledwith ever-increasing European Union and national regulatory burdens on those wishing to develop and market products, this could prevent or delay marketing approval of our product candidates, restrict or regulate post-approval activities and affectour ability to commercialize our product candidates, if approved.

In markets outside of the United States and the European Union,reimbursement and healthcare payment systems vary significantly by country, and many countries have instituted price ceilings on specific products and therapies.

We cannot predict the likelihood, nature or extent of government regulation that may arise from future legislation or administrative action inthe United States, the European Union or any other jurisdiction. If we or

 

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any third parties we may engage are slow or unable to adapt to changes in existing requirements or the adoption of new requirements or policies, or if we or such third parties are not able tomaintain regulatory compliance, our product candidates may lose any regulatory approval that may have been obtained and we may not achieve or sustain profitability.

Our future growth may depend, in part, on our ability to penetrate foreign markets, where we would be subject to additional regulatory burdens and otherrisks and uncertainties.

Our future profitability may depend, in part, on our ability to commercialize our product candidates inforeign markets for which we may rely on collaboration with third parties. We are evaluating the opportunities for the development and commercialization of our product candidates in foreign markets. We are not permitted to market or promote any ofour product candidates before we receive regulatory approval from the applicable regulatory authority in that foreign market, and we may never receive such regulatory approval for any of our product candidates. To obtain separate regulatory approvalin many other countries we must comply with numerous and varying regulatory requirements of such countries regarding safety and efficacy and governing, among other things, clinical trials and commercial sales, pricing and distribution of our productcandidates, and we cannot predict success in these jurisdictions. If we obtain approval of our product candidates and ultimately commercialize our product candidates in foreign markets, we would be subject to additional risks and uncertainties,including:

 

  

our customers’ ability to obtain reimbursement for our product candidates in foreign markets;

 

  

our inability to directly control commercial activities because we are relying on third parties;

 

  

the burden of complying with complex and changing foreign regulatory, tax, accounting and legal requirements;

 

  

different medical practices and customs in foreign countries affecting acceptance in the marketplace;

 

  

import or export licensing requirements;

 

  

longer accounts receivable collection times;

 

  

longer lead times for shipping;

 

  

language barriers for technical training and the need for language translations;

 

  

reduced protection of intellectual property rights in some foreign countries;

 

  

the existence of additional potentially relevant third-party intellectual property rights;

 

  

foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations; and

 

  

the interpretation of contractual provisions governed by foreign laws in the event of a contract dispute.

Foreign sales of our product candidates could also be adversely affected by the imposition of governmental controls,political and economic instability, trade restrictions and changes in tariffs.

In some countries, particularly the countries in Europe,the pricing of prescription pharmaceuticals is subject to governmental control. In these countries, pricing negotiations with governmental authorities can take

 

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considerable time after the receipt of marketing approval for a drug. To obtain reimbursement or pricing approval in some countries, we may be required to conduct a clinical trial that comparesthe cost-effectiveness of our product candidate to other available therapies. If reimbursement of our products is unavailable or limited in scope or amount, or if pricing is set at unsatisfactory levels, our business could be harmed, possiblymaterially.

Product liability lawsuits against us could cause us to incur substantial liabilities and could limit commercialization of any productcandidates that we may develop.

We will face an inherent risk of product liability exposure related to the testing of our productcandidates in human clinical trials and will face an even greater risk if we commercially sell any product candidates that we may develop. If we cannot successfully defend ourselves against claims that our product candidates caused injuries, wecould incur substantial liabilities. Regardless of merit or eventual outcome, liability claims may result in:

 

  

decreased demand for any product candidates that we may develop;

 

  

injury to our reputation and significant negative media attention;

 

  

regulatory investigations that could require costly recalls or product modifications;

 

  

withdrawal of clinical trial participants;

 

  

significant costs to defend the related litigation;

 

  

substantial monetary awards to trial participants or patients;

 

  

loss of potential revenue;

 

  

the diversion of management’s attention away from managing our business; and

 

  

the inability to commercialize any product candidates that we may develop.

Although we maintain product liability insurance coverage, it may not be adequate to cover all liabilities that we may incur and is subject todeductibles and coverage limitations. We anticipate that we will need to increase our insurance coverage when and if we successfully commercialize any product candidate. Insurance coverage is increasingly expensive. We may not be able to maintaininsurance coverage at a reasonable cost or in an amount adequate to satisfy any liability that may arise. If we are unable to obtain insurance at acceptable cost or otherwise protect against potential product liability claims, we will be exposed tosignificant liabilities, which may materially and adversely affect our business and financial position. These liabilities could prevent or interfere with our commercialization efforts.

Risks Related to Competition, Retaining Key Employees and Managing Growth

We face substantial competition, which may result in others discovering, developing or commercializing drugs before or more successfully than we do.

The development and commercialization of new drugs and biologics is highly competitive. We face competition with respect to ourcurrent product candidates, and will face competition with respect to any product candidates that we may seek to develop or commercialize in the future, from major pharmaceutical companies, specialty pharmaceutical companies and biotechnologycompanies worldwide. There are a number of large pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies that currently market and sell drugs or biologics are pursuing the development of therapies in the fields in which we are interested. Some of thesecompetitive products and

 

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therapies are based on entirely different scientific approaches to our approach. Potential competitors also include academic institutions, government agencies and other public and privateresearch organizations that conduct research, seek patent protection and establish collaborative arrangements for research, development, manufacturing and commercialization.

Many of the companies against which we are competing or against which we may compete in the future have significantly greater financialresources, a more established presence in the market, and more expertise in research and development, manufacturing, pre-clinical studies and clinical trials, obtaining regulatory approvals and reimbursementand marketing approved products than we do. Mergers and acquisitions in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostic industries may result in even more resources being concentrated among a smaller number of our competitors. Smaller or earlystage companies may also prove to be significant competitors, particularly through collaborative arrangements with large and established companies. These competitors also compete with us in recruiting and retaining highly qualified scientific,sales, marketing and management personnel and establishing clinical trial sites and patient registration for clinical trials, as well as in acquiring technologies complementary to, or necessary for, our programs.

Our commercial opportunity could be reduced or eliminated if our competitors develop and commercialize products that are safer, moreeffective, have fewer or less severe side effects, are more convenient or are less expensive than any drugs that we or our collaborators may develop. Because our product candidates are designed to reduce normal tissue toxicity from radiotherapy, ourcommercial opportunity could also be reduced or eliminated if radiotherapy methods are improved in a way that reduces normal tissue toxicity, or if new therapies are developed which effectively treat cancer with less or without normal tissuetoxicity. Our competitors also may obtain FDA or other regulatory approval for their products more rapidly than we may obtain approval for ours, which could result in our competitors establishing a strong market position before we or ourcollaborators are able to enter the market. The key competitive factors affecting the success of all of our product candidates, if approved, are likely to be their efficacy, safety, convenience, price, the effectiveness of companion diagnostics inguiding the use of related products, market acceptance by physicians and patients, the level of generic competition and the availability of reimbursement from government and other third-party payors.

Many of our employees have become or will soon become vested in a substantial amount of our common stock or a number of common stock options.Our employees may be more likely to leave us if the shares they own have significantly appreciated in value relative to the original purchase prices of the shares, or if the exercise prices of the options that they hold are significantly below themarket price of our common stock, particularly after the expiration of the lock-up agreements described herein.

Our future success depends on our ability to retain key executives and to attract, retain and motivate qualified personnel.

We have a limited operating history and are highly dependent on the research and development, clinical, commercial and business developmentexpertise of the principal members of our management, scientific and clinical team. Although we have entered into employment agreements with our executive officers, each of them may terminate their employment with us at any time. We do not maintain“key person” insurance for any of our executives or other employees. In addition, we rely on consultants and advisors, including scientific and clinical advisors, to assist us in formulating our research and development andcommercialization strategy. Our consultants and advisors may be employed by employers other than us and may have commitments under consulting or advisory contracts with other entities that may limit their availability to us. If we are unable tocontinue to attract and retain high quality personnel, our ability to pursue our growth strategy will be limited.

Recruiting andretaining qualified scientific, clinical, manufacturing and sales and marketing personnel will also be critical to our success. The failure to recruit, or the loss of the services of our executive officers or other key employees could impede theachievement of our research, development and commercialization objectives and seriously harm our ability to successfully implement our business strategy. Furthermore, replacing

 

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executive officers and key employees may be difficult and may take an extended period of time because of the limited number of individuals in our industry with the breadth of skills andexperience required to successfully develop, gain regulatory approval of and commercialize products. Competition to hire from this limited pool is intense, and we may be unable to hire, train, retain or motivate these key personnel on acceptableterms given the competition among numerous pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies for similar personnel. We also experience competition for the hiring of scientific and clinical personnel from universities and research institutions. Failure tosucceed in clinical trials may make it more challenging to recruit and retain qualified scientific personnel. If we are not able to continue to attract and retain, on acceptable terms, the qualified personnel necessary for the continued developmentof our business, we may not be able to sustain our operations or growth.

We will need to develop and expand our company, and we may encounterdifficulties in managing this development and expansion, which could disrupt our operations.

In connection with becoming a publiccompany, we expect to increase our number of employees and the scope of our operations. To manage our anticipated development and expansion, we must continue to implement and improve our managerial, operational and financial systems, expand ourfacilities and continue to recruit and train additional qualified personnel. Also, our management may need to divert a disproportionate amount of its attention away from itsday-to-day activities and devote a substantial amount of time to managing these development activities. Due to our limited resources, certain employees may need toperform activities that are beyond their regular scope of work, and we may not be able to effectively manage the expansion of our operations or recruit and train additional qualified personnel. This may result in weaknesses in our infrastructure,give rise to operational mistakes, loss of business opportunities, loss of employees and reduced productivity among remaining employees. The physical expansion of our operations may lead to significant costs and may divert financial resources fromother projects, such as the development of our product candidates. If our management is unable to effectively manage our expected development and expansion, our expenses may increase more than expected, our ability to generate revenue could bereduced and we may not be able to implement our business strategy. Our future financial performance and our ability to commercialize our product candidates, if approved, and compete effectively will depend, in part, on our ability to effectivelymanage the future development and expansion of our company.

We may not be successful in executing our growth strategy to identify, discover,develop, in-license or acquire additional product candidates or our growth strategy may not deliver the anticipated results.

We plan to source new product candidates that are complementary to our existing product candidates through our internal discovery program, or in-licensing or acquiring them from other companies or academic institutions. If we are unable to identify, discover, develop, in-license or acquire and integrate productcandidates in accordance with this strategy, our ability to pursue this part of our growth strategy would be limited.

Research programsand business development efforts to identify new product candidates require substantial technical, financial and human resources. We may focus our efforts and resources on potential programs or product candidates that ultimately prove to beunsuccessful. In-licensing and acquisitions of technology often require significant payments, expenses and will consume additional resources. We will need to devote a substantial amount of time and personnelto research, develop and commercialize any acquired technology, in addition to our existing portfolio of programs. Our research programs, business development efforts or licensing attempts may fail to yield additional complementary or successfulproduct candidates for clinical development and commercialization for a number of reasons, including, but not limited to, the following:

 

  

our research or business development methodology or search criteria and process may be unsuccessful inidentifying potential product candidates with a high probability of success for development progression;

 

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we may not be able or willing to assemble sufficient resources or expertise toin-license, acquire or discover additional product candidates;

 

  

for product candidates we seek to in-license or acquire, we may not beable to agree to acceptable terms with the licensor or owner of those product candidates;

 

  

our product candidates may not succeed in pre-clinical studies orclinical trials;

 

  

we may not succeed in formulation or process development;

 

  

our product candidates may be shown to have harmful side effects or may have other characteristics that may makethe products unmarketable or unlikely to receive regulatory approval;

 

  

competitors may develop alternatives that render our product candidates obsolete or less attractive;

 

  

product candidates that we develop may be covered by third parties’ patents or other exclusive rights;

 

  

product candidates that we develop may not allow us to leverage our expertise and our development and commercialinfrastructure as currently expected;

 

  

the market for a product candidate may change during our program so that such a product may become unreasonableto continue to develop;

 

  

a product candidate may not be capable of being produced in commercial quantities at an acceptable cost, or atall; and

 

  

a product candidate may not be accepted as safe and effective by patients, the medical community or third-partypayors.

If any of these events occurs, we may not be successful in executing our growth strategy or our growth strategymay not deliver the anticipated results.

Risks Related to Intellectual Property

If we are unable to adequately protect our proprietary technology and product candidates, if the scope of the patent protection obtained is notsufficiently broad, or if the terms of our patents are insufficient to protect our product candidates for an adequate amount of time, our competitors could develop and commercialize technology and products similar or identical to ours, and ourability to successfully commercialize our product candidates may be materially impaired.

We rely primarily upon a combination ofpatents, trademarks, trade secret protection, and other intellectual property rights as well as nondisclosure, confidentiality and other contractual agreements to protect the intellectual property related to our brands, product candidates, includingGC4419 and GC4711, and other proprietary technologies. Our success depends on our ability to develop, manufacture, market and sell our product candidates, if approved, and use our proprietary technologies without alleged or actual infringement,misappropriation or other violation of the patents and other intellectual property rights of third parties. There have been many lawsuits and other proceedings asserting patents and other intellectual property rights in the pharmaceutical andbiotechnology industries. We cannot assure you that our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711 will not infringe existing or future third-party patents. Because patent applications can take many years to issue and may be confidential for18 months or more after filing, there may be applications now pending of which we are unaware and which may later result in issued patents that we may infringe by

 

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commercializing our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711. There may also be issued patents or pending patent applications that we are aware of, but that we think are irrelevant to ourproduct candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711, which may ultimately be found to be infringed by the manufacture, sale, or use of our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711. Moreover, we may face claims fromnon-practicing entities that have no relevant product revenue and against whom our own patent portfolio may thus have no deterrent effect. In addition, many of our product candidates, including GC4419 andGC4711 have a complex structure that makes it difficult to conduct a thorough search and review of all potentially relevant third-party patents. Because we have not yet conducted a formal freedom to operate analysis for patents related to ourproduct candidates, we may not be aware of issued patents that a third party might assert are infringed by one of our current or future product candidates, which could materially impair our ability to commercialize our product candidates. Even if wediligently search third-party patents for potential infringement by our products or product candidates, including GC4419 or GC4711, we may not successfully find patents that our products or product candidates, including GC4419 or GC4711, mayinfringe. If we are unable to secure and maintain freedom to operate, others could preclude us from commercializing our product candidates.

The process of obtaining patent protection is expensive and time-consuming, and we may not be able to prosecute all necessary or desirablepatent applications at a reasonable cost or in a timely manner. We may choose not to seek patent protection for certain innovations or products and may choose not to pursue patent protection in certain jurisdictions, and under the laws of certainjurisdictions, patents or other intellectual property rights may be unavailable or limited in scope and, in any event, any patent protection we obtain may be limited. As a result, in some jurisdictions some of our products currently or in the futuremay not be, protected by patents. We generally apply for patents in those countries where we intend to make, have made, use, offer for sale, or sell products and where we assess the risk of infringement to justify the cost of seeking patentprotection. However, we may not accurately predict all the countries where patent protection would ultimately be desirable. If we fail to timely file a patent application in any such country or major market, we may be precluded from doing so at alater date. Competitors may use our technologies in jurisdictions where we have not obtained patent protection to develop their own products and, further, may export otherwise infringing products to territories in which we have patent protectionthat may not be sufficient to terminate infringing activities. In addition, the actual protection afforded by a patent varies on a product-by-product basis, from countryto country, and depends upon many factors, including the type of patent, the scope of its coverage, the availability of regulatory-related extensions, the availability of legal remedies in a particular country and the validity and enforceability ofthe patent.

Furthermore, we cannot guarantee that any patents will be issued from any pending or future owned or licensed patentapplications, or that any current or future patents will provide us with any meaningful protection or competitive advantage. Even if issued, existing or future patents may be challenged, including with respect to ownership, narrowed, invalidated,held unenforceable or circumvented, any of which could limit our ability to prevent competitors and other third parties from developing and marketing similar products or limit the length of terms of patent protection we may have for our productcandidates, including GC4419 and GC4711 and technologies. Moreover, should we be unable to obtain meaningful patent coverage for clinically relevant infusion rates for GC4419 and GC4711 in jurisdictions with commercially significant markets, ourability to extend and reinforce patent protection for these product candidates in those jurisdictions may be adversely impacted, which could limit our ability to prevent competitors and other third parties from developing and marketing similarproducts or limit the length of terms of patent protection we may have for those product candidates. Other companies may also design around technologies we have patented, licensed or developed. In addition, the issuance of a patent does not give usthe right to practice the patented invention. Third parties may have blocking patents that could prevent us from marketing our products or practicing our own patented technology.

The patent positions of biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies can be highly uncertain and involve complex legal, scientific and factualquestions for which important legal principles remain unresolved. As a result, the issuance, scope, validity, enforceability and commercial value of our patent rights may be

 

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uncertain. The standards that the United States Patent and Trademark Office, or the USPTO, and its foreign counterparts use to grant patents are not always applied predictably or uniformly.Changes in either the patent laws, implementing regulations or the interpretation of patent laws may diminish the value of our rights. The legal systems of certain countries do not protect intellectual property rights to the same extent as the lawsof the United States, and many companies have encountered significant problems in protecting and defending such rights in foreign jurisdictions. For example, patent laws in various jurisdictions, including significant commercial markets such asEurope, restrict the patentability of methods of treatment of the human body more than United States law does. In addition, many countries, including certain countries in Europe, have compulsory licensing laws under which a patent owner may becompelled to grant licenses to third parties (for example, the patent owner has failed to “work” the invention in that country, or the third party has patented improvements). In addition, many countries limit the enforceability of patentsagainst government agencies or government contractors. In these countries, the patent owner may have limited remedies, which could materially diminish the value of the patent. Moreover, the legal systems of certain countries, particularly certaindeveloping countries, do not favor the aggressive enforcement of patent and other intellectual property protection, which makes it difficult to stop infringement.

Because patent applications in the United States, Europe and many other jurisdictions are typically not published until 18 months afterfiling, or in some cases not at all, and because publications of discoveries in scientific literature lag behind actual discoveries, we cannot be certain that we were the first to conceive or reduce to practice the inventions claimed in our issuedpatents or pending patent applications, or that we were the first to file for protection of the inventions set forth in our patents or pending patent applications. We can give no assurance that all of the potentially relevant art relating to ourpatents and patent applications has been found; overlooked prior art could be used by a third party to challenge the validity, enforceability and scope of our patents or prevent a patent from issuing from a pending patent application. As a result,we may not be able to obtain or maintain protection for certain inventions. Therefore, the validity, enforceability and scope of our patents in the United States, Europe and in other countries cannot be predicted with certainty and, as a result, anypatents that we own or license may not provide sufficient protection against our competitors.

Third parties may challenge any existingpatent or future patent we own or license through adversarial proceedings in the issuing offices or in court proceedings, including as a response to any assertion of our patents against them. In any of these proceedings, a court or agency withjurisdiction may find our patents invalid and/or unenforceable, or even if valid and enforceable, insufficient to provide protection against competing products and services sufficient to achieve our business objectives. We may be subject to athird-party pre-issuance submission of prior art to the USPTO, or reexamination by the USPTO if a third party asserts a substantial question of patentability against any claim of a U.S. patent we own orlicense. The adoption of the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act, or the Leahy-Smith Act, in September 2011 established additional opportunities for third parties to invalidate U.S. patent claims, including inter partes review and post-grant reviewproceedings. Outside of the United States, patents we own or license may become subject to patent opposition or similar proceedings, which may result in loss of scope of some claims or the entire patent. In addition, such proceedings are verycomplex and expensive, and may divert our management’s attention from our core business. If any of our patents are challenged, invalidated, circumvented by third parties or otherwise limited or expire prior to the commercialization of ourproducts, and if we do not own or have exclusive rights to other enforceable patents protecting our products or other technologies, competitors and other third parties could market products and use processes that are substantially similar to, orsuperior to, ours and our business would suffer.

The degree of future protection for our proprietary rights is uncertain because legalmeans afford only limited protection and may not adequately protect our rights or permit us to gain or keep a competitive advantage. For example:

 

  

others may be able to develop products that are similar to, or better than, ours in a way that is not covered bythe claims of our patents;

 

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we might not have been the first to conceive or reduce to practice the inventions covered by our patents orpending patent applications;

 

  

we might not have been the first to file patent applications for our inventions;

 

  

any patents that we obtain may not provide us with any competitive advantages or may ultimately be found invalidor unenforceable; or

 

  

we may not develop additional proprietary technologies that are patentable.

We are generally also subject to all of the same risks with respect to protection of intellectual property that we license as we are forintellectual property that we own. We currently in-license certain intellectual property from third parties to be able to use such intellectual property in our products and product candidates and to aid in ourresearch activities. In the future, we may in-license intellectual property from additional licensors. We may rely on certain of these licensors to file and prosecute patent applications and maintain, orassist us in the maintenance of, patents and otherwise protect the intellectual property we license from them. We may have limited control over these activities or any other intellectual property that may be related to our in-licensed intellectual property. For example, we cannot be certain that such activities by these licensors have been or will be conducted diligently or in compliance with applicable laws and regulations or willresult in valid and enforceable patents and other intellectual property rights. We may have limited control over the manner in which our licensors initiate, or support our efforts to initiate, an infringement proceeding against a third-partyinfringer of the intellectual property rights, or defend certain of the intellectual property that is licensed to us. If we or our licensors fail to adequately protect this intellectual property, our ability to commercialize products could suffer.

We may become involved in lawsuits to protect or enforce our patents or other intellectual property, which could be expensive, time-consuming andunsuccessful.

Competitors may infringe, misappropriate or otherwise violate our patents, trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets orother intellectual property, or those of our licensors. To counter infringement, misappropriation, unauthorized use or other violations, we may be required to file legal claims, which can be expensive and time consuming and divert the time andattention of our management and scientific personnel. In some cases, it may be difficult or impossible to detect third-party infringement or misappropriation of our intellectual property rights, even in relation to issued patent claims, and provingany such infringement may be even more difficult.

We may not be able to prevent, alone or with our licensees or any future licensors,infringement, misappropriation or other violations of our intellectual property rights, particularly in countries where the laws may not protect those rights as fully as in the United States. Any claims we assert against perceived infringers couldprovoke these parties to assert counterclaims against us alleging that we infringe their patents. In patent litigation in the United States, defendant counterclaims alleging invalidity or unenforceability are commonplace. The outcome following legalassertions of invalidity and unenforceability is unpredictable. We cannot be certain that there is no invalidating prior art, of which we and the patent examiner were unaware during prosecution. If a third party or a defendant were to prevail on alegal assertion of invalidity or unenforceability, we would lose at least part, and perhaps all, of any future patent protection on our current or future product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711. Such a loss of patent protection could harmour business. In addition, in a patent infringement proceeding, there is a risk that a court will decide that a patent of ours is invalid or unenforceable, in whole or in part, and that we do not have the right to stop the other party fromexploiting the claimed subject matter at issue. There is also a risk that, even if the validity of such patents is upheld, the court will construe the patent’s claims narrowly or decide that we do not have the right to stop the other party fromexploiting its technology on the grounds that our patents do not cover such technology. An adverse outcome in a litigation or proceeding involving our patents could limit our ability to assert our patents against those parties or other competitors,and may curtail or preclude our ability to exclude third parties from making, using, importing and selling similar or competitive products. Any of these occurrences could adversely affect our competitive business

 

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position, business prospects and financial condition. Similarly, if we assert trademark infringement claims, a court may determine that the marks we have asserted are invalid or unenforceable, orthat the party against whom we have asserted trademark infringement has superior rights to the marks in question. In this case, we could ultimately be forced to cease use of such trademarks.

In any infringement, misappropriation or other intellectual property litigation, any award of monetary damages we receive may not becommercially valuable. Furthermore, because of the substantial amount of discovery required in connection with intellectual property litigation, there is a risk that some of our confidential information could be compromised by disclosure duringlitigation. Moreover, there can be no assurance that we will have sufficient financial or other resources to file and pursue such infringement claims, which typically last for years before they are concluded. Even if we ultimately prevail in suchclaims, the monetary cost of such litigation and the diversion of the attention of our management and scientific personnel could outweigh any benefit we receive as a result of the proceedings. We may not be able to detect or prevent misappropriationof our intellectual property rights, particularly in countries where the laws may not protect those rights as fully as in the United States. Our business could be harmed if in litigation the prevailing party does not offer us a license oncommercially reasonable terms. Any litigation or other proceedings to enforce our intellectual property rights may fail, and even if successful, may result in substantial costs and distract our management and other employees.

Our commercial success depends significantly on our ability to operate without infringing upon the intellectual property rights of third parties.

The biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries are subject to rapid technological change and substantial litigation regardingpatent and other intellectual property rights. Our competitors in both the United States and abroad, many of which have substantially greater resources and have made substantial investments in patent portfolios and competing technologies, may haveapplied for or obtained or may in the future apply for or obtain, patents that will prevent, limit or otherwise interfere with our ability to make, use and sell our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711 and services. Numerous third-partypatents exist in the fields relating to our products and services, and it is difficult for industry participants, including us, to identify all third-party patent rights relevant to our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711, services andtechnologies. As the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries expand and more patents are issued, the risk increases that our product candidates may give rise to claims of infringement of the patent rights of others. Moreover, because some patentapplications are maintained as confidential for a certain period of time, we cannot be certain that third parties have not filed patent applications that cover our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711, services and technologies.Therefore, it is uncertain whether the issuance of any third-party patent would require us to alter our development or commercial strategies for our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711 or processes, or to obtain licenses or cease certainactivities.

Patents could be issued to third parties that we may ultimately be found to infringe. Third parties may have or obtain validand enforceable patents or proprietary rights that could block us from developing products using our technology. If any third-party patents were held by a court of competent jurisdiction to cover the manufacturing process of our product candidates,constructs or molecules used in or formed during the manufacturing process, or any final product itself, the holders of any such patents may be able to block our ability to commercialize the product candidate unless we obtain a license under theapplicable patents, or until such patents expire or they are determined to be held invalid or unenforceable. Our failure to obtain or maintain a license to any technology that we require to develop or commercialize our current and future productcandidates, including GC4419 and GC4711 may materially harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. Furthermore, we would be exposed to a threat of litigation.

From time to time, we may be party to, or threatened with, litigation or other proceedings with third parties, including non-practicing entities, who allege that our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711, components of our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711, services, and/or proprietary

 

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technologies infringe, misappropriate or otherwise violate their intellectual property rights. The types of situations in which we may become a party to such litigation or proceedings include:

 

  

we or our collaborators may initiate litigation or other proceedings against third parties seeking to invalidatethe patents held by those third parties or to obtain a judgment that our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711 or processes do not infringe those third parties’ patents;

 

  

we or our collaborators may participate at substantial cost in International Trade Commission proceedings toabate importation of third party products that would compete unfairly with our products;

 

  

if our competitors file patent applications that claim technology also claimed by us or our licensors, we or ourlicensors may be required to participate in interference, derivation or opposition proceedings to determine the priority of invention, which could jeopardize our patent rights and potentially provide a third party with a dominant patent position;

 

  

if third parties initiate litigation claiming that our processes or product candidates, including GC4419 andGC4711 infringe their patent or other intellectual property rights, we and our collaborators will need to defend against such proceedings;

 

  

if third parties initiate litigation or other proceedings, including inter partes reviews, oppositions or othersimilar agency proceedings, seeking to invalidate patents owned by or licensed to us or to obtain a declaratory judgment that their products, services, or technologies do not infringe our patents or patents licensed to us, we will need to defendagainst such proceedings;

 

  

we may be subject to ownership disputes relating to intellectual property, including disputes arising fromconflicting obligations of consultants or others who are involved in developing our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711; and

 

  

if a license to necessary technology is terminated, the licensor may initiate litigation claiming that ourprocesses or product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711 infringe or misappropriate its patent or other intellectual property rights and/or that we breached our obligations under the license agreement, and we and our collaborators would need todefend against such proceedings.

These lawsuits and proceedings, regardless of merit, are time-consuming and expensiveto initiate, maintain, defend or settle, and could divert the time and attention of managerial and technical personnel, which could materially adversely affect our business. Any such claim could also force use to do one or more of the following:

 

  

incur substantial monetary liability for infringement or other violations of intellectual property rights, whichwe may have to pay if a court decides that the product candidate, service, or technology at issue infringes or violates the third party’s rights, and if the court finds that the infringement was wilful, we could be ordered to pay up to trebledamages and the third party’s attorneys’ fees;

 

  

pay substantial damages to our customers or end users to discontinue use or replace infringing technology with non-infringing technology;

 

  

stop manufacturing, offering for sale, selling, using, importing, exporting or licensing the product ortechnology incorporating the allegedly infringing technology or stop incorporating the allegedly infringing technology into such product, service, or technology;

 

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obtain from the owner of the infringed intellectual property right a license, which may require us to paysubstantial upfront fees or royalties to sell or use the relevant technology and which may not be available on commercially reasonable terms, or at all;

 

  

redesign our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711, services, and technology so they do not infringe orviolate the third party’s intellectual property rights, which may not be possible or may require substantial monetary expenditures and time;

 

  

enter into cross-licenses with our competitors, which could weaken our overall intellectual property position;

 

  

lose the opportunity to license our technology to others or to collect royalty payments based upon successfulprotection and assertion of our intellectual property against others;

 

  

find alternative suppliers for non-infringing products and technologies,which could be costly and create significant delay; or

 

  

relinquish rights associated with one or more of our patent claims, if our claims are held invalid or otherwiseunenforceable.

Some of our competitors may be able to sustain the costs of complex intellectual property litigationmore effectively than we can because they have substantially greater resources. In addition, intellectual property litigation, regardless of its outcome, may cause negative publicity, adversely impact prospective customers, cause product shipmentdelays, or prohibit us from manufacturing, marketing or otherwise commercializing our products, services and technology. Any uncertainties resulting from the initiation and continuation of any litigation could have a material adverse effect on ourability to raise additional funds or otherwise have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operation, financial condition or cash flows.

In addition, we may indemnify our customers and distributors against claims relating to the infringement of intellectual property rights ofthird parties related to our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711. Third parties may assert infringement claims against our customers or distributors. These claims may require us to initiate or defend protracted and costly litigation onbehalf of our customers or distributors, regardless of the merits of these claims. If any of these claims succeed, we may be forced to pay damages on behalf of our customers, suppliers or distributors, or may be required to obtain licenses for theproduct candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711 or services they use. If we cannot obtain all necessary licenses on commercially reasonable terms, our customers may be forced to stop using our products or services.

Furthermore, because of the substantial amount of discovery required in connection with intellectual property litigation, there is a risk thatsome of our confidential information could be compromised by disclosure during this type of litigation. There could also be public announcements of the results of hearings, motions or other interim proceedings or developments, which could have amaterial adverse effect on the price of our common stock. If securities analysts or investors perceive these results to be negative, it could have a material adverse effect on the price of our common stock. The occurrence of any of these events mayhave a material adverse effect on our business, results of operation, financial condition or cash flows.

If we are unable to protect theconfidentiality of our trade secrets, our business and competitive position may be harmed.

In addition to patent and trademarkprotection, we also rely on trade secrets, including unpatented know-how, technology and other proprietary information, to maintain our competitive position. Because we expect to rely on third parties tomanufacture our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711, and we expect to continue to collaborate with third parties on the development of our product candidates, including

 

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GC4419 and GC4711, we must, at times, share trade secrets with them. We seek to protect our trade secrets, in part, by entering into non-disclosure andconfidentiality agreements with parties who have access to them prior to disclosing our proprietary information, such as our consultants and vendors, or our former or current employees. These agreements typically limit the rights of third parties touse or disclose our confidential information, including our trade secrets. We also enter into confidentiality and invention assignment agreements with our employees and consultants. Despite these efforts, however, any of these parties may breach theagreements and disclose our trade secrets and other unpatented or unregistered proprietary information, and once disclosed, we are likely to lose trade secret protection. Monitoring unauthorized uses and disclosures of our intellectual property isdifficult, and we do not know whether the steps we have taken to protect our intellectual property will be effective. In addition, we may not be able to obtain adequate remedies for any such breaches. Enforcing a claim that a party illegallydisclosed or misappropriated a trade secret is difficult, expensive and time-consuming, and the outcome is unpredictable. In addition, some courts inside and outside the United States are less willing or unwilling to enforce trade secret protection.A competitor’s discovery of our trade secrets would impair our competitive position and have an adverse impact on our business, operating results and financial condition. Additionally, we cannot be certain that competitors will not gain accessto our trade secrets and other proprietary confidential information or independently develop substantially equivalent information and techniques.

Changes in patent law could diminish the value of patents in general, thereby impairing our ability to protect our existing and future productcandidates, including GC4419 and GC4711 and processes.

As is the case with other biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, oursuccess is heavily dependent on intellectual property, particularly patents. Obtaining and enforcing patents in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries involves both technological and legal complexity, and is therefore costly, timeconsuming, and inherently uncertain. In addition, the United States has recently enacted and is currently implementing wide-ranging patent reform legislation. Recent patent reform legislation could increase the uncertainties and costs surroundingthe prosecution of our patent applications and the enforcement or defense of our issued patents. On September 16, 2011, the Leahy-Smith Act was signed into law. The Leahy-Smith Act includes a number of significant changes to U.S. patent law.These include provisions that affect the way patent applications are prosecuted, redefine prior art, may affect patent litigation, and switched the United States patent system from a“first-to-invent” system to a “first-to-file” system. Under a “first-to-file” system, assuming the other requirements for patentability are met, the first inventor to file a patent application generally will be entitled to thepatent on an invention regardless of whether another inventor had conceived or reduced to practice the invention earlier. The USPTO recently developed new regulations and procedures to govern administration of the Leahy-Smith Act, and many of thesubstantive changes to patent law associated with the Leahy-Smith Act, in particular, the first-to-file provisions, only became effective on March 16, 2013.Accordingly, it is not clear what, if any, impact the Leahy-Smith Act will have on the operation of our business. The Leahy-Smith Act and its implementation could increase the uncertainties and costs surrounding the prosecution of our patentapplications and the enforcement or defense of our issued patents, all of which could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition.

In addition, patent reform legislation may pass in the future that could lead to additional uncertainties and increased costs surrounding theprosecution, enforcement and defense of our patents and pending patent applications. Recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings have narrowed the scope of patent protection available in certain circumstances and weakened the rights of patent owners incertain situations. Furthermore, the U.S. Supreme Court and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit have made, and will likely continue to make, changes in how the patent laws of the United States are interpreted. Similarly, foreign courtshave made, and will likely continue to make, changes in how the patent laws in their respective jurisdictions are interpreted. We cannot predict future changes in the interpretation of patent laws or changes to patent laws that might be enacted intolaw by United States and foreign legislative bodies. Those changes may materially affect our patents or patent applications and our ability to obtain additional patent protection in the future.

The United States federal government retains certain rights in inventions produced with its financial assistance under the Patent andTrademark Law Amendments Act, or the Bayh-Dole Act. The federal

 

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government retains a “nonexclusive, nontransferable, irrevocable, paid-up license” for its own benefit. The Bayh-Dole Act also provides federalagencies with “march-in rights.” March-in rights allow the government, in specified circumstances, to require the contractor or successors in title to thepatent to grant a “nonexclusive, partially exclusive, or exclusive license” to a “responsible applicant or applicants.” If the patent owner refuses to do so, the government may grant the license itself. We partner with a numberof universities, including the University of Iowa and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, with respect to certain of our research, development and manufacturing. While it is our policy to avoid engaging our university partnersin projects in which there is a risk that federal funds may be commingled, we cannot be sure that any co-developed intellectual property will be free from government rights pursuant to the Bayh-Dole Act. If,in the future, we co-own or license in technology which is critical to our business that is developed in whole or in part with federal funds subject to the Bayh-Dole Act, our ability to enforce or otherwiseexploit patents covering such technology may be adversely affected.

If we do not obtain patent term extensions in the United States under theHatch-Waxman Act and in foreign countries under similar legislation with respect to our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711, thereby potentially extending the term of marketing exclusivity for such product candidates, including GC4419and GC4711, our business may be harmed.

In the United States, a patent that covers anFDA-approved drug or biologic may be eligible for a term extension designed to restore the period of the patent term that is lost during the premarket regulatory review process conducted by the FDA. Dependingupon the timing, duration and conditions of FDA marketing approval of our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711, one or more of our U.S. patents may be eligible for limited patent term extension under the Drug Price Competition and PatentTerm Restoration Act of 1984, or the Hatch-Waxman Act, which permits a patent term extension of up to a maximum of five years beyond the normal expiration of the patent if the patent is eligible for such an extension under the Hatch-Waxman Act ascompensation for patent term lost during development and the FDA regulatory review process, which is limited to the approved indication (and potentially additional indications approved during the period of extension) covered by the patent. Thisextension is limited to only one patent that covers the approved product, the approved use of the product, or a method of manufacturing the product. However, the applicable authorities, including the FDA and the USPTO in the United States, and anyequivalent regulatory authority in other countries, may not agree with our assessment of whether such extensions are available, and may refuse to grant extensions to our patents, or may grant more limited extensions than we request.

We may not receive an extension if we fail to apply within applicable deadlines, fail to apply prior to expiration of relevant patents orotherwise fail to satisfy applicable requirements. Even if we are granted such extension, the duration of such extension may be less than our request and the patent term may still expire before or shortly after we receive FDA marketing approval. Ifwe are unable to extend the expiration date of our existing patents or obtain new patents with longer expiry dates, our competitors may be able to take advantage of our investment in development and clinical trials by referencing our clinical and pre-clinical data to obtain approval of competing products following our patent expiration and launch their product earlier than might otherwise be the case.

Obtaining and maintaining patent protection depends on compliance with various procedural, document submission, fee payment and other requirementsimposed by governmental patent agencies, and our patent protection could be reduced or eliminated for non-compliance with these requirements.

The USPTO and various foreign governmental patent agencies require compliance with a number of procedural, documentary, fee payment, and othersimilar provisions during the patent application process. In addition, periodic maintenance fees on issued patents often must be paid to the USPTO and foreign patent agencies over the lifetime of the patent. While an unintentional lapse can in manycases be cured by payment of a late fee or by other means in accordance with the applicable rules, there are situations in which noncompliance can result in abandonment or lapse of the patent or patent application, resulting in partial or completeloss of

 

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patent rights in the relevant jurisdiction. Non-compliance events that could result in abandonment or lapse of a patent or patent application include, butare not limited to, failure to respond to official actions within prescribed time limits, non-payment of fees and failure to properly legalize and submit formal documents. If we fail to maintain the patentsand patent applications covering our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711 or procedures, we may not be able to stop a competitor from marketing products that are the same as or similar to our own, which would have a material adverseeffect on our business.

If our trademarks and trade names are not adequately protected, then we may not be able to build name recognition in ourmarkets of interest and our business may be adversely affected.

We have not yet registered trademarks for a commercial trade namefor our product candidate(s), including GC4419 and GC4711 in the United States or elsewhere. During trademark registration proceedings, our trademark application(s) may be rejected. Although we are given an opportunity to respond to thoserejections, we may be unable to overcome such rejections. In addition, in the USPTO and in comparable agencies in many foreign jurisdictions, third parties can oppose pending trademark applications and seek to cancel registered trademarks.Opposition or cancellation proceedings may be filed against our trademarks, and our trademarks may not survive such proceedings. Moreover, any name we propose to use with our product candidate(s), including GC4419 and GC4711 in the United Statesmust be approved by the FDA, regardless of whether we have registered it, or applied to register it, as a trademark. The FDA typically conducts a review of proposed product names, including an evaluation of potential for confusion with other productnames. If the FDA objects to any of our proposed proprietary product names, we may be required to expend significant additional resources in an effort to identify a suitable substitute name that would qualify under applicable trademark laws, notinfringe the existing rights of third parties and be acceptable to the FDA.

Our registered or unregistered trademarks or trade names maybe challenged, infringed, circumvented, declared generic or determined to be infringing on other marks. We may not be able to protect our rights in these trademarks and trade names, which we need in order to build name recognition with potentialpartners or customers in our markets of interest. In addition, third parties have used trademarks similar and identical to our trademarks in foreign jurisdictions, and have filed or may in the future file for registration of such trademarks. If theysucceed in registering or developing common law rights in such trademarks, and if we are not successful in challenging such third-party rights, we may not be able to use these trademarks to market our products in those countries. In any case, if weare unable to establish name recognition based on our trademarks and trade names, then we may not be able to compete effectively and our business may be adversely affected.

We may not be able to adequately protect our intellectual property rights throughout the world.

Certain of our key patent families have been filed in the United States, as well as in numerous jurisdictions outside the United States.However, our intellectual property rights in certain jurisdictions outside the United States may be less robust. The laws of some foreign countries do not protect intellectual property rights to the same extent as the laws of the United States. Forexample, the requirements for patentability may differ in certain countries, particularly developing countries, and we may be unable to obtain issued patents that contain claims that adequately cover or protect our current or future productcandidates, including GC4419 and GC4711. Many companies have encountered significant problems in protecting and defending intellectual property rights in certain foreign jurisdictions. The legal systems of some countries, particularly developingcountries, do not favor the enforcement of patents and other intellectual property protection, especially those relating to life sciences. This could make it difficult for us to stop the infringement of our patents or the misappropriation of ourother intellectual property rights. For example, many foreign countries have compulsory licensing laws under which a patent owner must grant licenses to third parties. In addition, many countries limit the enforceability of patents against thirdparties, including government agencies or government contractors. In these countries, patents may provide limited or no benefit.

Proceedings to enforce our patent rights in foreign jurisdictions, whether or not successful, could result in substantial costs and divert ourefforts and attention from other aspects of our business. Furthermore, while we

 

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intend to protect our intellectual property rights in our expected significant markets, we cannot ensure that we will be able to initiate or maintain similar efforts in all jurisdictions in whichwe may wish to market current or future product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711. Consequently, we may not be able to prevent third parties from practicing our technology in all countries outside the United States, or from selling orimporting products made using our technology in and into those other jurisdictions where we do not have intellectual property rights. Competitors may use our technologies in jurisdictions where we have not obtained patent protection to develop theirown products and may also export infringing products to territories where we have patent protection, but where enforcement is not as strong as that in the United States. These products may compete with our product candidates, including GC4419 andGC4711, and our patents or other intellectual property rights may not be effective or sufficient to prevent them from competing. Accordingly, our efforts to protect our intellectual property rights in such countries may be inadequate. In addition,changes in the law and legal decisions by courts in the United States and foreign countries may affect our ability to obtain and enforce adequate intellectual property protection for our technology.

We may not identify relevant third-party patents or may incorrectly interpret the relevance, scope or expiration of a third-party patent which mightadversely affect our ability to develop and market our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711.

We cannot guarantee thatany of our or our licensors’ patent searches or analyses, including the identification of relevant patents, the scope of patent claims or the expiration of relevant patents, are complete or thorough, nor can we be certain that we haveidentified each and every third-party patent and pending application in the United States and abroad that is relevant to or necessary for the commercialization of our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711 in any jurisdiction. For example,U.S. patent applications filed before November 29, 2000 and certain U.S. patent applications filed after that date that will not be filed outside the United States remain confidential until patents issue. Patent applications in the UnitedStates and elsewhere are published approximately 18 months after the earliest filing for which priority is claimed, with such earliest filing date being commonly referred to as the priority date. Therefore, patent applications covering our productcandidates, including GC4419 and GC4711 could have been filed by others without our knowledge. Additionally, pending patent applications that have been published can, subject to certain limitations, be later amended in a manner that could cover ourproduct candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711 or the use of our products. The scope of a patent claim is determined by an interpretation of the law, the written disclosure in a patent and the patent’s prosecution history. Our interpretationof the relevance or the scope of a patent or a pending application may be incorrect, which may negatively impact our ability to market our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711. We may incorrectly determine that our product candidates,including GC4419 and GC4711 are not covered by a third-party patent or may incorrectly predict whether a third party’s pending patent application will issue with claims of relevant scope. Our determination of the expiration date of any patentin the United States or abroad that we consider relevant may be incorrect, which may negatively impact our ability to develop and market our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711 and services. Our failure to identify and correctlyinterpret relevant patents may negatively impact our ability to develop and market our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711 and services.

If we fail to identify and correctly interpret relevant patents, we may be subject to infringement claims. We cannot guarantee that we will beable to successfully settle or otherwise resolve such infringement claims. If we fail in any such dispute, in addition to being forced to pay damages, we may be temporarily or permanently prohibited from commercializing any of our productcandidates, including GC4419 and GC4711 that are held to be infringing. We might, if possible, also be forced to redesign products, product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711 or services so that we no longer infringe the third-partyintellectual property rights. Any of these events, even if we were ultimately to prevail, could require us to divert substantial financial and management resources that we would otherwise be able to devote to our business.

 

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Patent terms may be inadequate to protect our competitive position on our product candidates,including GC4419 and GC4711 for an adequate amount of time.

Patents have a limited lifespan, and the protection patents afford islimited. In the United States, if all maintenance fees are timely paid, the natural expiration of a patent is generally 20 years from its earliest U.S. non-provisional filing date. Even if patents covering ourproduct candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711 are obtained, once the patent life has expired for patents covering a product or product candidate, we may be open to competition from competitive products and services. As a result, our patentportfolio may not provide us with sufficient rights to exclude others from commercializing products similar or identical to ours.

Intellectualproperty rights do not necessarily address all potential threats to our business.

While we seek broad coverage under our existingpatent applications, there is always a risk that an alteration to products or processes may provide sufficient basis for a competitor to avoid infringing our patent claims. In addition, patents, if granted, expire and we cannot provide any assurancethat any potentially issued patents will adequately protect our product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711. Once granted, patents may remain open to invalidity challenges including opposition, interference,re-examination, post-grant review, inter partes review, nullification or derivation action in court or before patent offices or similar proceedings for a given period after allowance or grant, during whichtime third parties can raise objections against such grant. In the course of such proceedings, which may continue for a protracted period of time, the patent owner may be compelled to limit the scope of the allowed or granted claims thus attacked,or may lose the allowed or granted claims altogether.

In addition, the degree of future protection afforded by our intellectual propertyrights is uncertain because even granted intellectual property rights have limitations, and may not adequately protect our business, provide a barrier to entry against our competitors or potential competitors or permit us to maintain our competitiveadvantage. Moreover, if a third party has intellectual property rights that cover the practice of our technology, we may not be able to fully exercise or extract value from our intellectual property rights. The following examples are illustrative:

 

  

others may be able to develop and/or practice technology that is similar to our technology or aspects of ourtechnology, but that are not covered by the claims of the patents that we own or control, assuming such patents have issued or do issue;

 

  

we or our licensors or any future strategic partners might not have been the first to conceive or reduce topractice the inventions covered by the issued patents or pending patent applications that we own or have exclusively licensed;

 

  

we or our licensors or any future strategic partners might not have been the first to file patent applicationscovering certain of our inventions;

 

  

others may independently develop similar or alternative technologies or duplicate any of our technologies withoutinfringing our intellectual property rights;

 

  

it is possible that our pending patent applications will not lead to issued patents;

 

  

issued patents that we own or have exclusively licensed may not provide us with any competitive advantage, or maybe held invalid or unenforceable, as a result of legal challenges by our competitors;

 

  

our competitors might conduct research and development activities in countries where we do not have patent rightsand then use the information learned from such activities to develop competitive products for sale in our major commercial markets;

 

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third parties performing manufacturing or testing for us using our product candidates, including GC4419 andGC4711 or technologies could use the intellectual property of others without obtaining a proper license;

 

  

parties may assert an ownership interest in our intellectual property and, if successful, such disputes maypreclude us from exercising exclusive rights over that intellectual property;

 

  

we may not develop or in-license additional proprietary technologies thatare patentable;

 

  

we may not be able to obtain and maintain necessary licenses on commercially reasonable terms, or at all; and

 

  

the patents of others may have an adverse effect on our business.

Should any of these events occur, they could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations andprospects.

We may be subject to claims that our employees, consultants or independent contractors have wrongfully used or disclosed confidentialinformation of their former employers or other third parties.

We do and may employ individuals who were previously employed atuniversities or other biotechnology or pharmaceutical companies, including our licensors, competitors or potential competitors. Although we try to ensure that our employees, consultants and independent contractors do not use the proprietaryinformation or know-how of others in their work for us, and we are not currently subject to any claims that our employees, consultants or independent contractors have wrongfully used or disclosed confidentialinformation of third parties, we may in the future be subject to such claims.

Litigation may be necessary to defend against these claims.If we fail in defending any such claims, in addition to paying monetary damages, we may lose valuable intellectual property rights or personnel. Such intellectual property rights could be awarded to a third party, and we could be required to obtaina license from such third party to commercialize our technology or product candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711. Such a license may not be available on commercially reasonable terms or at all. Even if we are successful in defending against suchclaims, litigation could result in substantial costs and be a distraction to management and other employees, and could result in customers seeking other sources for the technology, or in ceasing from doing business with us.

Our intellectual property agreements with third parties may be subject to disagreements over contract interpretation, which could narrow the scope ofour rights to the relevant intellectual property or technology.

Certain provisions in our intellectual property agreements may besusceptible to multiple interpretations. The resolution of any contract interpretation disagreement that may arise could affect the scope of our rights to the relevant intellectual property or technology, or affect financial or other obligationsunder the relevant agreement, either of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

In addition, while we typically require our employees, consultants and contractors who may be involved in the conception or development ofintellectual property to execute agreements assigning such intellectual property to us, we may be unsuccessful in executing such an agreement with each party who in fact conceives or develops intellectual property that we regard as our own. To theextent that we fail to obtain such assignments, such assignments do not contain a self-executing assignment of intellectual property rights or such assignment agreements are breached, we may be forced to bring claims against third parties, or defendclaims they may bring against us, to determine the ownership of what we regard as our intellectual property and this may interfere with

 

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our ability to capture the commercial value of such intellectual property. If we fail in prosecuting or defending any such claims, in addition to paying monetary damages, we may lose valuableintellectual property rights or personnel. Such intellectual property rights could be awarded to a third party, and we could be required to obtain a license from such third party to commercialize our technology or products. Such a license may not beavailable on commercially reasonable terms or at all. Even if we are successful in prosecuting or defending against such claims, litigation could result in substantial costs and be a distraction to our management and scientific personnel. Disputesregarding ownership or inventorship of intellectual property can also arise in other contexts, such as collaborations and sponsored research. We may be subject to claims that former collaborators or other third parties have an ownership interest inour patents or other intellectual property. If we are subject to a dispute challenging our rights in or to patents or other intellectual property, such a dispute could be expensive and time-consuming. If we are unsuccessful, we could lose valuablerights in intellectual property that we regard as our own.

We may not be successful in obtaining necessary intellectual property rights to futureproducts through acquisitions and in-licenses.

Although we intend to develop products andtechnology through our own internal research, we may also seek to acquire or in-license technologies to grow our product offerings and technology portfolio. However, we may be unable to acquire or in-license intellectual property rights relating to, or necessary for, any such products or technology from third parties on commercially reasonable terms or at all. In that event, we may be unable to develop orcommercialize such products or technology. We may also be unable to identify products or technology that we believe are an appropriate strategic fit for our Company and protect intellectual property relating to, or necessary for, such products andtechnology.

The in-licensing and acquisition of third-party intellectual property rights forproduct candidates, including GC4419 and GC4711 is a competitive area, and a number of more established companies are also pursuing strategies to in-license or acquire third-party intellectual property rightsfor products that we may consider attractive or necessary. These established companies may have a competitive advantage over us due to their size, cash resources and greater clinical development and commercialization capabilities. Furthermore,companies that perceive us to be a competitor may be unwilling to assign or license rights to us. If we are unable to successfully obtain rights to additional technologies or products, our business, financial condition, results of operations andprospects for growth could suffer.

In addition, we expect that competition for the in-licensingor acquisition of third-party intellectual property rights for products and technologies that are attractive to us may increase in the future, which may mean fewer suitable opportunities for us as well as higher acquisition or licensing costs. Wemay be unable to in-license or acquire the third-party intellectual property rights for products or technology on terms that would allow us to make an appropriate return on our investment.

Other Risks Related to Our Business

Our business operations and current and future relationships with investigators, healthcare professionals, consultants, third-party payors, patientorganizations and customers will be subject to applicable healthcare regulatory laws, which could expose us to penalties.

Ourbusiness operations and current and future arrangements with investigators, healthcare professionals, consultants, third-party payors, patient organizations and customers, may expose us to broadly applicable fraud and abuse and other healthcare lawsand regulations. These laws may constrain the business or financial arrangements and relationships through which we conduct our operations, including how we research, market, sell and distribute our product candidates, if approved. Such lawsinclude:

 

  

the U.S. federal Anti-Kickback Statute, which prohibits, among other things, persons or entities from knowinglyand willfully soliciting, offering, receiving or providing any remuneration

 

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(including any kickback, bribe, or certain rebate), directly or indirectly, overtly or covertly, in cash or in kind, to induce or reward, or in return for, either the referral of an individualfor, or the purchase, lease, order or recommendation of, any good, facility, item or service, for which payment may be made, in whole or in part, under U.S. federal and state healthcare programs such as Medicare and Medicaid. A person or entity doesnot need to have actual knowledge of the statute or specific intent to violate it in order to have committed a violation;

 

  

the U.S. federal civil and criminal false claims and civil monetary penalties laws, including the civil FalseClaims Act, which prohibit, among other things, including through civil whistleblower or qui tam actions, individuals or entities from knowingly presenting, or causing to be presented, to the U.S. federal government, claims for payment or approvalthat are false or fraudulent, knowingly making, using or causing to be made or used, a false record or statement material to a false or fraudulent claim, or from knowingly making a false statement to avoid, decrease or conceal an obligation to paymoney to the U.S. federal government. In addition, the government may assert that a claim including items and services resulting from a violation of the U.S. federal Anti-Kickback Statute constitutes a false or fraudulent claim for purposes of theFalse Claims Act;

 

  

the U.S. federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, or HIPAA, which created additionalfederal criminal statutes which prohibit, among other things, knowingly and willfully executing, or attempting to execute, a scheme to defraud any healthcare benefit program, or knowingly and willfully falsifying, concealing or covering up amaterial fact or making any materially false statement, in connection with the delivery of, or payment for, healthcare benefits, items or services. Similar to the U.S. federal Anti-Kickback Statute, a person or entity does not need to have actualknowledge of the statute or specific intent to violate it in order to have committed a violation;

 

  

HIPAA, as amended by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 and itsimplementing regulations, which imposes certain obligations, including mandatory contractual terms, with respect to safeguarding the privacy, security and transmission of individually identifiable health information without appropriate authorizationby covered entities subject to the rule, such as certain health plans, healthcare clearinghouses and healthcare providers as well as their business associates, independent contractors of a covered entity that perform certain services involving theuse or disclosure of individually identifiable health information;

 

  

the U.S. Physician Payments Sunshine Act and its implementing regulations, which requires certain manufacturersof drugs, devices, biologics and medical supplies that are reimbursable under Medicare, Medicaid, or the Children’s Health Insurance Program, with specific exceptions, to report annually to the government information related to certain paymentsand other transfers of value to physicians and teaching hospitals, as well as ownership and investment interests held by physicians and their immediate family members;

 

  

analogous U.S. state laws and regulations, including: state anti-kickback and false claims laws, which may applyto our business practices, including but not limited to, research, distribution, sales and marketing arrangements and claims involving healthcare items or services reimbursed by any third-party payor, including private insurers; state laws thatrequire pharmaceutical companies to comply with the pharmaceutical industry’s voluntary compliance guidelines and the relevant compliance guidance promulgated by the U.S. federal government, or otherwise restrict payments that may be made tohealthcare providers and other potential referral sources; state laws and regulations that require drug manufacturers to file reports relating to pricing and marketing information, which requires tracking gifts and other remuneration and items ofvalue provided to healthcare professionals and entities; state and local laws that require the registration of pharmaceutical sales representatives; and state laws governing the privacy and security of health information in certain circumstances,many of which differ from each other in significant ways and often are not preempted by HIPAA, thus complicating compliance efforts; and

 

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similar healthcare laws and regulations in the European Union and other jurisdictions, including reportingrequirements detailing interactions with and payments to healthcare providers and requirements regarding the collection, distribution, use, security, and storage of personally identifiable information and other data relating to individuals(including the EU General Data Protection Regulation 2016/679, or GDPR).

As of May 25, 2018, the GDPR replaced theData Protection Directive with respect to the processing of personal data in the European Union. The GDPR imposes many requirements for controllers and processors of personal data, including, for example, higher standards for obtaining consent fromindividuals to process their personal data, more robust disclosures to individuals and a strengthened individual data rights regime, shortened timelines for data breach notifications, limitations on retention and secondary use of information,increased requirements pertaining to health data and pseudonymised (i.e., key-coded) data and additional obligations when we contract third-party processors in connection with the processing of the personaldata. The GDPR allows EU member states to make additional laws and regulations further limiting the processing of genetic, biometric or health data. Failure to comply with the requirements of GDPR and the applicable national data protection laws ofthe EU member states may result in fines of up to €20,000,000 or up to 4% of the total worldwide annual turnover of the preceding financial year, whichever is higher, and other administrative penalties.

Ensuring that our internal operations and future business arrangements with third parties comply with applicable healthcare laws andregulations will involve substantial costs. It is possible that governmental authorities will conclude that our business practices do not comply with current or future statutes, regulations, agency guidance or case law involving applicable fraud andabuse or other healthcare laws and regulations. If our operations are found to be in violation of any of the laws described above or any other governmental laws and regulations that may apply to us, we may be subject to significant penalties,including civil, criminal and administrative penalties, damages, fines, exclusion from government-funded healthcare programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid or similar programs in other countries or jurisdictions, integrity oversight and reportingobligations to resolve allegations of non-compliance, disgorgement, individual imprisonment, contractual damages, reputational harm, diminished profits and the curtailment or restructuring of our operations.If any of the physicians or other providers or entities with whom we expect to do business are found to not be in compliance with applicable laws, they may be subject to criminal, civil or administrative sanctions, including exclusions fromgovernment funded healthcare programs and imprisonment, which could affect our ability to operate our business. Further, defending against any such actions can be costly, time-consuming and may require significant personnel resources. Therefore,even if we are successful in defending against any such actions that may be brought against us, our business may be impaired.

Unfavorable globaleconomic conditions could adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations.

Our results of operationscould be adversely affected by general conditions in the global economy and in the global financial markets. For example, the global financial crisis caused extreme volatility and disruptions in the capital and credit markets. A severe orprolonged economic downturn, such as the global financial crisis, could result in a variety of risks to our business, including, weakened demand for our product candidates and our ability to raise additional capital when needed on acceptableterms, if at all. A weak or declining economy could also strain our suppliers, possibly resulting in supply disruption, or cause our customers to delay making payments for our services. Doing business internationally involves a number of risks,including but not limited to:

 

  

multiple, conflicting and changing laws and regulations such as privacy regulations, tax laws and export andimport restrictions;

 

  

employment laws, regulatory requirements and other governmental approvals, permits and licenses;

 

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failure by us to obtain and maintain regulatory approvals for the use of our products in various countries;

 

  

additional potentially relevant third-party patent rights;

 

  

complexities and difficulties in obtaining protection and enforcing our intellectual property;

 

  

difficulties in staffing and managing foreign operations;

 

  

complexities associated with managing multiple payor reimbursement regimes, government payors or patient self-pay systems;

 

  

limits in our ability to penetrate international markets;

 

  

financial risks, such as longer payment cycles, difficulty collecting accounts receivable, the impact of localand regional financial crises on demand and payment for our products and exposure to foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations;

 

  

natural disasters, political and economic instability, including wars, terrorism, political unrest, outbreak ofdisease and boycotts;

 

  

curtailment of trade, and other business restrictions;

 

  

certain expenses including, among others, expenses for travel, translation and insurance; and

 

  

regulatory and compliance risks that relate to maintaining accurate information and control over sales andactivities that may fall within the purview of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, its books and records provisions or its anti-bribery provisions.

Any of the foregoing could harm our business and we cannot anticipate all of the ways in which the current economic climate and financialmarket conditions could adversely impact our business.

Our internal computer systems, or those of our third-party CMOs, CROs or other contractorsor consultants, may fail or suffer security breaches, which could result in a material disruption of our product candidates’ development programs.

Despite the implementation of security measures, our internal computer systems and those of our third-party CMOs, CROs and other contractorsand consultants are vulnerable to damage from computer viruses, unauthorized access, theft, natural disasters, terrorism, war and telecommunication and electrical failures. While we have not experienced any such system failure or accident, from timeto time, we have been the target of cybersecurity breach attempts and expect them to continue as cybersecurity threats have been rapidly evolving in sophistication and becoming more prevalent. While these cybersecurity breaches have not had amaterial impact on our operations, future breaches may do so. If such an event were to occur and cause interruptions in our operations, it could result in a material disruption of our programs. For example, the loss of clinical trial data for ourproduct candidates could result in delays in our regulatory approval efforts and significantly increase our costs to recover or reproduce the data. To the extent that any disruption or security breach results in a loss of or damage to our data orapplications or other data or applications relating to our technology or product candidates, or inappropriate disclosure or theft of confidential or proprietary information, we could incur liabilities and the further development of our productcandidates could be delayed.

 

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We face potential liability related to the privacy of health information we obtain from clinicaltrials sponsored by us.

Most healthcare providers, including research institutions from which we obtain patient healthinformation, are subject to privacy and security regulations promulgated under HIPAA, as amended by the HITECH. We are not currently classified as a covered entity or business associate under HIPAA and thus are not subject to its requirements orpenalties. However, any person may be prosecuted under HIPAA’s criminal provisions either directly or under aiding-and-abetting or conspiracy principles.Consequently, depending on the facts and circumstances, we could face substantial criminal penalties if we knowingly receive individually identifiable health information from a HIPAA-covered healthcare provider or research institution that has notsatisfied HIPAA’s requirements for disclosure of individually identifiable health information. In addition, we may maintain sensitive personally identifiable information, including health information, that we receive throughout the clinicaltrial process, in the course of our research collaborations, and directly from individuals (or their healthcare providers) who enroll in our patient assistance programs. As such, we may be subject to state laws requiring notification of affectedindividuals and state regulators in the event of a breach of personal information, which is a broader class of information than the health information protected by HIPAA. Our clinical trial programs outside the United States may implicateinternational data protection laws, including the EU Data Protection Directive and legislation of the EU member states implementing it.

Our activities outside the United States impose additional compliance requirements and generate additional risks of enforcement fornoncompliance. Failure by our CROs and other third-party contractors to comply with the strict rules on the transfer of personal data outside of the European Union into the United States may result in the imposition of criminal and administrativesanctions on such collaborators, which could adversely affect our business. Furthermore, certain health privacy laws, data breach notification laws, consumer protection laws and genetic testing laws may apply directly to our operations and/or thoseof our collaborators and may impose restrictions on our collection, use and dissemination of individuals’ health information. Moreover, patients about whom we or our collaborators obtain health information, as well as the providers who sharethis information with us, may have statutory or contractual rights that limit our ability to use and disclose the information. We may be required to expend significant capital and other resources to ensure ongoing compliance with applicable privacyand data security laws. Claims that we have violated individuals’ privacy rights or breached our contractual obligations, even if we are not found liable, could be expensive and time-consuming to defend and could result in adverse publicitythat could harm our business.

If we or third-party CMOs, CROs or other contractors or consultants fail to comply with applicable federal,state or local regulatory requirements, we could be subject to a range of regulatory actions that could affect our or our contractors’ ability to develop and commercialize our product candidates and could harm or prevent sales of any affectedproducts that we are able to commercialize, or could substantially increase the costs and expenses of developing, commercializing and marketing our products. Any threatened or actual government enforcement action could also generate adversepublicity and require that we devote substantial resources that could otherwise be used in other aspects of our business. Increasing use of social media could give rise to liability, breaches of data security or reputational damage.

Violations of or liabilities under environmental, health and safety laws and regulations could subject us to fines, penalties or other costs that couldhave a material adverse effect on the success of our business.

We are subject to numerous environmental, health and safety lawsand regulations, including those governing laboratory procedures, the handling, use, storage, treatment and disposal of hazardous materials and wastes and the cleanup of contaminated sites. Our operations involve the use of potentially hazardous andflammable materials, including chemicals and biological materials. Our operations also produce hazardous waste products. We could incur substantial costs as a result of violations of or liabilities under environmental requirements in connection withour operations or property, including fines, penalties and other sanctions, investigation and cleanup costs and third-party claims. Although we generally contract with third parties for the

 

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disposal of hazardous materials and wastes from our operations, we cannot eliminate the risk of contamination or injury from these materials. In the event of contamination or injury resultingfrom our use of hazardous materials, we could be held liable for any resulting damages, and any liability could exceed our resources.

Furthermore, environmental laws and regulations are complex, change frequently and have tended to become more stringent. We cannot predict theimpact of changes to applicable laws and regulations and cannot be certain of our future compliance. In addition, we may incur substantial costs in order to comply with current or future environmental, health and safety laws and regulations. Thesecurrent or future laws and regulations may impair our research, development or production efforts.

Although we maintain workers’compensation insurance to cover us for costs and expenses we may incur due to injuries to our employees resulting from the use of hazardous materials, this insurance may not provide adequate coverage against potential liabilities. We do not maintaininsurance for environmental liability or toxic tort claims that may be asserted against us in connection with our storage or disposal of biological, hazardous or radioactive materials.

Insurance policies are expensive and leave the Company exposed to uninsured liabilities.

Some of the insurance policies we currently maintain include general liability, employment practices liability, property, workers’compensation, umbrella, and directors’ and officers’ insurance. These policies may not adequately cover all categories of risk that our business may encounter.

Any additional product liability insurance coverage we acquire in the future may not be sufficient to reimburse us for any expenses or losseswe may suffer. Moreover, insurance coverage is becoming increasingly expensive and in the future we may not be able to maintain insurance coverage at a reasonable cost or in sufficient amounts to protect us against losses due to liability. If weobtain marketing approval for GC4419, we intend to acquire insurance coverage to include the sale of commercial products; however, we may be unable to obtain product liability insurance on commercially reasonable terms or in adequate amounts. Asuccessful product liability claim or series of claims brought against us could cause our share price to decline and, if judgments exceed our insurance coverage, could adversely affect our results of operations and business, including preventing orlimiting the development and commercialization of any product candidates we develop. We do not carry specific biological or hazardous waste insurance coverage, and our property, casualty and general liability insurance policies specifically excludecoverage for damages and fines arising from biological or hazardous waste exposure or contamination. Accordingly, in the event of contamination or injury, we could be held liable for damages or be penalized with fines in an amount exceeding ourresources, and our clinical trials or regulatory approvals could be suspended.

We also expect that operating as a public company willmake it more difficult and more expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance, and we may be required to accept reduced policy limits and coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain the same or similar coverage. As aresult, it may be more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified people to serve on our board of directors, our board committees or as executive officers. We do not know, however, if we will be able to maintain existing insurance withadequate levels of coverage. Any significant uninsured liability may require us to pay substantial amounts, which would adversely affect our cash position and results of operations.

We and our employees are increasingly utilizing social media tools as a means of communication both internally and externally.

Despite our efforts to monitor evolving social media communication guidelines and comply with applicable rules, there is risk that the use ofsocial media by us or our employees to communicate about our product candidates or business may cause us to be found in violation of applicable requirements. In addition, our employees may knowingly or inadvertently make use of social media in waysthat may not comply with our

 

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social media policy or other legal or contractual requirements, which may give rise to liability, lead to the loss of trade secrets or other intellectual property or result in public exposure ofpersonal information of our employees, clinical trial patients, customers and others. Furthermore, negative posts or comments about us or our product candidates in social media could seriously damage our reputation, brand image and goodwill. Any ofthese events could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, operating results and financial condition and could adversely affect the price of our common stock.

Our employees and independent contractors, including consultants, vendors, and any third parties we may engage in connection with development andcommercialization may engage in misconduct or other improper activities, including noncompliance with regulatory standards and requirements, which could harm our business.

Misconduct by our employees and independent contractors, including consultants, vendors, and any third parties we may engage in connectionwith development and commercialization, could include intentional, reckless or negligent conduct or unauthorized activities that violate: (i) the laws and regulations of the FDA, the EMA and other comparable regulatory authorities, includingthose laws that require the reporting of true, complete and accurate information to such authorities; (ii) manufacturing standards; (iii) data privacy, security, fraud and abuse and other healthcare laws and regulations; or (iv) lawsthat require the reporting of true, complete and accurate financial information and data. Specifically, sales, marketing and business arrangements in the healthcare industry are subject to extensive laws and regulations intended to prevent fraud,misconduct, kickbacks, self-dealing and other abusive practices. These laws and regulations may restrict or prohibit a wide range of pricing, discounting, marketing and promotion, sales commission, customer incentive programs and other businessarrangements. Activities subject to these laws could also involve the improper use or misrepresentation of information obtained in the course of clinical trials, creation of fraudulent data in pre-clinicalstudies or clinical trials or illegal misappropriation of drug product, which could result in regulatory sanctions and cause serious harm to our reputation. It is not always possible to identify and deter misconduct by employees and other thirdparties, and the precautions we take to detect and prevent this activity may not be effective in controlling unknown or unmanaged risks or losses or in protecting us from governmental investigations or other actions or lawsuits stemming from afailure to comply with such laws or regulations. Additionally, we are subject to the risk that a person or government could allege such fraud or other misconduct, even if none occurred. If any such actions are instituted against us, and we are notsuccessful in defending ourselves or asserting our rights, those actions could have a significant impact on our business and results of operations, including the imposition of significant civil, criminal and administrative penalties, damages,monetary fines, disgorgements, possible exclusion from participation in Medicare, Medicaid, other U.S. federal healthcare programs or healthcare programs in other jurisdictions, integrity oversight and reporting obligations to resolve allegations ofnon-compliance, individual imprisonment, other sanctions, contractual damages, reputational harm, diminished profits and future earnings, and curtailment of our operations.

We or the third parties upon whom we depend may be adversely affected by natural disasters and our business continuity and disaster recovery plans maynot adequately protect us from a serious disaster.

Natural disasters could severely disrupt our operations and have a materialadverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects. If a natural disaster, power outage or other event occurred that prevented us from using all or a significant portion of our headquarters, that damagedcritical infrastructure, such as the manufacturing facilities on which we rely, or that otherwise disrupted operations, it may be difficult or, in certain cases, impossible for us to continue our business for a substantial period of time. Thedisaster recovery and business continuity plans we have in place may prove inadequate in the event of a serious disaster or similar event. We may incur substantial expenses as a result of the limited nature of our disaster recovery and businesscontinuity plans, which could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

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We may acquire businesses, or products or product candidates, or form strategic alliances, in thefuture, and we may not realize the benefits of such acquisitions.

We have acquired andin-licensed, and may acquire or in-license additional businesses or products, from other companies or create joint ventures with third parties that we believe willcomplement or augment our existing business. If we acquire businesses with promising markets or technologies, we may not be able to realize the benefit of acquiring such businesses if we are unable to successfully integrate them with our existingoperations and company culture. We may encounter numerous difficulties in developing, manufacturing and marketing any new products resulting from a strategic alliance or acquisition that delay or prevent us from realizing their expected benefits orenhancing our business. We cannot assure you that, following any such acquisition or license, we will achieve the expected synergies to justify the transaction.

The impact of the Tax Act on our financial results is not entirely clear and could differ materially from the financial statements provided herein.

On December 22, 2017, the United States enacted the Tax Act, which significantly reformed the U.S. Internal Revenue Code of1986, as amended, or the Code. Among a number of significant changes to the current U.S. federal income tax rules, the Tax Act reduced the marginal U.S. corporate income tax rate from 35% to 21%, limited the deduction for net interest expense,shifted the United States toward a more territorial tax system, and imposed new taxes to combat erosion of the U.S. federal income tax base. The financial statements contained herein reflect the effects of the Tax Act based on current guidance.However, there remain uncertainties and ambiguities in the application of certain provisions of the Tax Act, and, as a result, we made certain judgments and assumptions in the interpretation thereof. The U.S. Treasury Department and the InternalRevenue Service may issue further guidance on how the provisions of the Tax Act will be applied or otherwise administered that differs from our current interpretation. In addition, the Tax Act could be subject to potential amendments and technicalcorrections, any of which could materially lessen or increase certain adverse impacts of the legislation on us. As we further analyze the impact of the Tax Act and collect relevant information to complete our computations of the related accountingimpact, we may make adjustments to the provisional amounts that could materially affect our provision.

Our ability to use our net operating lossesto offset future taxable income may be subject to certain limitations.

In general, under Section 382 of the Code, acorporation that undergoes an “ownership change,” generally defined as a greater than 50% change by value in its equity ownership over a three year period, is subject to limitations on its ability to utilize its pre change net operatinglosses, or NOLs, to offset future taxable income. Our existing NOLs may be subject to limitations arising from previous ownership changes, and if we undergo an ownership change, our ability to utilize NOLs could be further limited bySection 382 of the Code. Future changes in our stock ownership, some of which might be beyond our control, could result in an ownership change under Section 382 of the Code. For these reasons, in the event we experience a change ofcontrol, we may not be able to utilize a material portion of the NOLs even if we attain profitability.

We are a multinational company that facescomplex taxation regimes in various jurisdictions. Audits, investigations, and tax proceedings could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, and financial condition.

We are subject to income and non-income taxes in multiple jurisdictions. Income tax accounting ofteninvolves complex issues, and judgment is required in determining our worldwide provision for income taxes and other tax liabilities. In particular, the jurisdictions in which we operate have detailed transfer pricing rules, which require that alltransactions with non-resident related parties be priced using arm’s length pricing principles within the meaning of such rules. We could be subject to tax audits involving transfer pricing issues. Webelieve that our tax positions are reasonable and our tax reserves are adequate to cover any potential liability. However, tax authorities in certain jurisdictions may disagree with our position, including the propriety of our related party

 

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arm’s length transfer pricing policies and the tax treatment of corresponding expenses and income. If any of these tax authorities were successful in challenging our positions, we may beliable for additional income tax and penalties and interest related thereto in excess of any reserves established therefor, which may have a significant impact on our results and operations and future cash flow.

Risks Related to Our Common Stock and This Offering

An active trading market for our common stock may not develop, and you may not be able to resell your shares at or above the initial public offeringprice.

Prior to this offering, there has been no public market for our common stock. Although we have applied to list our commonstock on The Nasdaq Global Market, an active trading market for our common stock may never develop or be sustained following this offering. The initial public offering price of our common stock will be determined through negotiations between us andthe underwriters. This initial public offering price may not be indicative of the market price of our common stock after this offering. In the absence of an active trading market for our common stock, investors may not be able to sell their commonstock at or above the initial public offering price or at the time that they would like to sell.

The price of our common stock is likely to bevolatile and fluctuate substantially, which could result in substantial losses for purchasers of our common stock in this offering.

Our share price is likely to be volatile. The shares market in general and the market for biopharmaceutical companies in particular haveexperienced extreme volatility that has often been unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies. As a result of this volatility, you may not be able to sell your common stock at or above the initial public offering price. Themarket price for our common stock may be influenced by many factors, including:

 

  

the results of clinical trials for our product candidates;

 

  

delays in the commencement, enrollment and the ultimate completion of clinical trials;

 

  

the results and potential impact of competitive products or technologies;

 

  

our ability to manufacture and successfully produce our product candidates;

 

  

actual or anticipated changes in estimates as to financial results, development timelines or recommendations bysecurities analysts;

 

  

the level of expenses related to any of our product candidates or clinical development programs;

 

  

variations in our financial results or those of companies that are perceived to be similar to us;

 

  

financing or other corporate transactions, or inability to obtain additional funding;

 

  

failure to meet or exceed expectations of the investment community;

 

  

regulatory or legal developments in the United States and other countries;

 

  

the recruitment or departure of key personnel;

 

  

developments or disputes concerning patent applications, issued patents or other proprietary rights;

 

  

the results of our efforts to discover, develop, acquire or in-licenseadditional product candidates;

 

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changes in the structure of healthcare payment systems;

 

  

market conditions in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sectors;

 

  

general economic, industry and market conditions;

 

  

changes in voting control of our executive officers and certain other members of our senior management oraffiliates who hold our shares; and

 

  

the other factors described in this “Risk Factors” section.

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports, or publish unfavorable research or reports, about us, our business or our market,our shares price and trading volume could decline.

The trading market for our common stock will be influenced by the research andreports that equity research analysts publish about us and our business. We do not currently have and may never obtain research coverage by equity research analysts. Equity research analysts may elect not to provide research coverage of our commonstock after this offering, and such lack of research coverage may adversely affect the market price of our common stock. In the event we do have equity research analyst coverage, we will not have any control over the analysts or the content andopinions included in their reports. The price of our shares could decline if one or more equity research analysts downgrades our shares or issues other unfavorable commentary or research. If one or more equity research analysts ceases coverage ofour company or fails to publish reports on us regularly, demand for our common stock could decrease, which in turn could cause the price of our common stock or its trading volume to decline.

A significant portion of our total outstanding shares are restricted from immediate resale but may be sold into the market in the near future. Thiscould cause the market price of our common stock to drop significantly, even if our business is doing well.

Sales of asubstantial number of shares of our common stock in the public market could occur at any time. These sales, or the perception in the market that these sales may occur, could result in a decrease in the market price of our common stock. Immediatelyafter this offering, we will have outstanding                shares of common stock, based on the number of shares common stock outstanding as of September 30, 2019,after giving effect to the automatic conversion of all outstanding shares of our redeemable convertible preferred stock into shares of our common stock immediately prior to the closing of this offering. This includes the shares of our common stockthat we are selling in this offering, which may be resold in the public market immediately without restriction, unless purchased by our affiliates or existing stockholders. Of the remainingshares,                shares are currently restricted as a result of securities laws or 180-daylock-up agreements (which may be waived, with or without notice, by BofA Securities, Inc. and Citigroup Global Markets Inc.) but will be able to be sold beginning 180 days after this offering, unless held byone of our affiliates, in which case the resale of those securities will be subject to volume limitations under Rule 144 of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act. See “Shares Eligible for Future Sale.” Moreover,after this offering, holders of an aggregate of up to                shares of our common stock, including shares of our common stock issued upon the automaticconversion of all outstanding shares of our redeemable convertible preferred stock immediately prior to the closing of this offering, will have rights, subject to certain conditions, to require us to file registration statements covering theirshares or to include their shares in registration statements that we may file for ourselves or other stockholders as described in the section of this prospectus entitled “Description of Capital Stock—Registration Rights.” We alsointend to register all shares of common stock that we may issue under our equity compensation plans. Once we register these shares, they can be freely sold in the public market, subject to volume limitations applicable to affiliates and the lock-up agreements referred to above and described in the section of this prospectus entitled “Underwriting.”

 

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If you purchase shares of our common stock in this offering, you will suffer immediate dilution ofyour investment.

The initial public offering price of our common stock is substantially higher than the as adjusted net tangiblebook value per share of common stock. Therefore, if you purchase common stock in this offering, you will pay a price per share of our common stock that substantially exceeds our as adjusted net tangible book value per share of common stock afterthis offering. To the extent outstanding options are exercised, you will incur further dilution. Based on the assumed initial public offering price of$                per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, you will experience immediate dilution of$                per share of common stock, representing the difference between our as adjusted net tangible book value per share of common stock after giving effect tothis offering and the initial public offering price. In addition, purchasers of common stock in this offering will have contributed approximately                % of theaggregate price paid by all purchasers of our common stock but will own only approximately                % of our common stock outstanding after this offering. See“Dilution.”

Future sales and issuances of our common stock or rights to purchase common stock, including pursuant to our equity incentiveplans, could result in additional dilution of the percentage ownership of our stockholders and could cause our common stock price to fall.

We will need additional capital in the future to continue our planned operations. To the extent we raise additional capital by issuingadditional common stock or other equity securities, our stockholders may experience substantial dilution. We may sell common stock, convertible securities or other equity securities in one or more transactions at prices and in a manner we determinefrom time to time. If we sell common stock, convertible securities or other equity securities in more than one transaction, investors may be materially diluted by subsequent sales. These sales may also result in material dilution to our existingstockholders, and new investors could gain rights superior to our existing stockholders.

Our directors, officers and principal stockholders havesignificant voting power and may take actions that may not be in the best interests of our other stockholders.

After thisoffering, our officers, directors and principal stockholders each holding more than 5% of our common stock, collectively, will control approximately                 % ofour outstanding common stock. As a result, these stockholders, if they act together, will be able to control the management and affairs of our company and most matters requiring stockholder approval, including the election of directors and approvalof significant corporate transactions. The interests of these stockholders may not be the same as or may even conflict with your interests. For example, these stockholders could attempt to delay or prevent a change in control of us, even if suchchange in control would benefit our other stockholders, which could deprive our stockholders of an opportunity to receive a premium for their common stock as part of a sale of us or our assets, and might affect the prevailing market price of ourcommon stock due to investors’ perceptions that conflicts of interest may exist or arise. As a result, this concentration of ownership may not be in the best interests of our other stockholders.

We have broad discretion in how we use the proceeds of this offering and may not use these proceeds effectively, which could affect our results ofoperations and cause our shares price to decline.

We will have considerable discretion in the application of the net proceeds ofthis offering. We intend to use the net proceeds from this offering, together with our existing cash resources, to fund our clinical development programs, working capital and other general corporate purposes. We may also use a portion of the netproceeds from this offering to in-license, acquire or invest in additional businesses, technologies, products or assets, although currently we have no specific agreements, commitments or understandings in thisregard. As a result, investors will be relying upon management’s judgment with only limited information about our specific intentions for the use of the balance of the net proceeds of this offering. We may use the net proceeds for purposes thatdo not yield a significant return or any return at all for our stockholders. In addition, pending their

 

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use, we may invest the net proceeds from this offering in a manner that does not produce income or that loses value.

We are an “emerging growth company,” and the reduced disclosure requirements applicable to emerging growth companies may make our common stockless attractive to investors.

We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the JOBS Act. We will remain anemerging growth company until the earlier of (a) the last day of the fiscal year in which we have total annual gross revenues of $1.07 billion or more; (b) the last day of the fiscal year following the fifth anniversary of the date ofthe completion of this offering; (c) the date on which we have issued more than $1 billion in nonconvertible debt during the previous three years; or (d) the date on which we are deemed to be a large accelerated filer under the rulesof the Securities and Exchange Commission, which means the market value of our common stock that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the prior June 30th. For so long as we remain anemerging growth company, we are permitted and intend to rely on exemptions from certain disclosure requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies. These exemptions include:

 

  

not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-OxleyAct of 2002, or Section 404;

 

  

an exemption from compliance with the requirement of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board regarding thecommunication of critical audit matters in the auditor’s report on the financial statements;

 

  

providing only two years of audited financial statements in addition to any required unaudited interim financialstatements and a correspondingly reduced “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” disclosure;

 

  

reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation; and

 

  

exemptions from the requirements of holding a nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and stockholderapproval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. In this prospectus, we have not included all of the executive compensation-related information that would be required if we were not an emerging growth company.

We may choose to take advantage of some, but not all, of the available exemptions. We have taken advantage of reducedreporting burdens in this prospectus. In particular, we have provided only two years of audited financial statements and have not included all of the executive compensation information that would be required if we were not an emerging growthcompany. We cannot predict whether investors will find our common stock less attractive if we rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our common stock less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our commonstock and our shares price may be more volatile.

We are a “smaller reporting company” and the reduced disclosure requirements applicableto smaller reporting companies may make our common stock less attractive to investors.

We are considered a “smallerreporting company.” We are therefore entitled to rely on certain reduced disclosure requirements, such as an exemption from providing selected financial data and executive compensation information. We are also exempt from the requirement toobtain an external audit on the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting provided in Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. These exemptions and reduced disclosures in our SEC filings due to our status as a smallerreporting company mean our auditors do not review our internal control over financial reporting and may make it harder for investors to analyze our results of operations and financial prospects. We cannot predict if investors will find our

 

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common stock less attractive because we may rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our common stock less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our commonstock and our stock prices may be more volatile.

We will incur increased costs as a result of operating as a public company, and our managementwill be required to devote substantial time to new compliance initiatives.

As a public company, and particularly after we are nolonger an “emerging growth company,” we will incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses that we did not incur as a private company. In addition, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and rules subsequently implemented by theSecurities and Exchange Commission and Nasdaq have imposed various requirements on public companies, including establishment and maintenance of effective disclosure and financial controls and corporate governance practices. Our management and otherpersonnel will need to devote a substantial amount of time to these compliance initiatives. Moreover, these rules and regulations will increase our legal and financial compliance costs and will make some activities more time-consuming and costly.For example, we expect that these rules and regulations may make it more difficult and more expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance.

Pursuant to Section 404, we will be required to furnish a report by our management on our internal control over financial reporting,including an attestation report on internal control over financial reporting issued by our independent registered public accounting firm. However, while we remain an emerging growth company, we will not be required to include an attestation reporton internal control over financial reporting issued by our independent registered public accounting firm. To achieve compliance with Section 404 within the prescribed period, we will be engaged in a process to document and evaluate our internalcontrol over financial reporting, which is both costly and challenging. In this regard, we will need to continue to dedicate internal resources, potentially engage outside consultants and adopt a detailed work plan to assess and document theadequacy of internal control over financial reporting, continue steps to improve control processes as appropriate, validate through testing that controls are functioning as documented and implement a continuous reporting and improvement process forinternal control over financial reporting. Despite our efforts, there is a risk that neither we nor our independent registered public accounting firm will be able to conclude within the prescribed timeframe that our internal control over financialreporting is effective as required by Section 404. This could result in an adverse reaction in the financial markets due to a loss of confidence in the reliability of our financial statements.

Provisions in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws and under Delaware law could make an acquisition ofour company, which may be beneficial to our stockholders, more difficult and may prevent attempts by our stockholders to replace or remove our current management.

Provisions in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and our amended and restated bylaws, which will become effective upon theclosing of this offering, may discourage, delay or prevent a merger, acquisition or other change in control of our company that stockholders may consider favorable, including transactions in which you might otherwise receive a premium for yourshares. These provisions could also limit the price that investors might be willing to pay in the future for shares of our common stock, thereby depressing the market price of our common stock. In addition, because our board of directors isresponsible for appointing the members of our management team, these provisions may frustrate or prevent any attempts by our stockholders to replace or remove our current management by making it more difficult for stockholders to replace members ofour board of directors. Among other things, these provisions include those establishing:

 

  

a classified board of directors with three-year staggered terms, which may delay the ability of stockholders tochange the membership of a majority of our board of directors;

 

  

no cumulative voting in the election of directors, which limits the ability of minority stockholders to electdirector candidates;

 

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the exclusive right of our board of directors to elect a director to fill a vacancy created by the expansion ofthe board of directors or the resignation, death or removal of a director, which prevents stockholders from filling vacancies on our board of directors;

 

  

the ability of our board of directors to authorize the issuance of shares of preferred stock and to determine theterms of those shares, including preferences and voting rights, without stockholder approval, which could be used to significantly dilute the ownership of a hostile acquirer;

 

  

the ability of our board of directors to alter our bylaws without obtaining stockholder approval;

 

  

the required approval of the holders of at least two-thirds of the sharesentitled to vote at an election of directors to adopt, amend or repeal our bylaws or repeal the provisions of our amended and restated certificate of incorporation regarding the election and removal of directors;

 

  

a prohibition on stockholder action by written consent, which forces stockholder action to be taken at an annualor special meeting of our stockholders;

 

  

the requirement that a special meeting of stockholders may be called only by the chairman of the board ofdirectors, the chief executive officer, the president or the board of directors, which may delay the ability of our stockholders to force consideration of a proposal or to take action, including the removal of directors; and

 

  

advance notice procedures that stockholders must comply with in order to nominate candidates to our board ofdirectors or to propose matters to be acted upon at a stockholders’ meeting, which may discourage or deter a potential acquirer from conducting a solicitation of proxies to elect the acquirer’s own slate of directors or otherwiseattempting to obtain control of us.

Moreover, because we are incorporated in Delaware, we are governed by theprovisions of Section 203 of the General Corporation Law of the State of Delaware, which prohibits a person who owns in excess of 15% of our outstanding voting stock from merging or combining with us for a period of three years after the dateof the transaction in which the person acquired in excess of 15% of our outstanding voting stock, unless the merger or combination is approved in a prescribed manner.

Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation provides that the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware will be the exclusive forum forsubstantially all disputes between us and our stockholders, which could limit our stockholders’ ability to obtain a favorable judicial forum for disputes with us or our directors, officers or employees.

Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation provides that, unless we consent in writing to the selection of an alternative forum tothe fullest extent permitted by law, the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware will be the sole and exclusive forum for (1) any derivative action or proceeding brought on our behalf, (2) any action asserting a claim for breach of afiduciary duty owed by any of our directors, officers or other employees to us or our stockholders, (3) any action asserting a claim arising pursuant to any provision of the General Corporation Law of the State of Delaware, our amended andrestated certificate of incorporation or our amended and restated bylaws, (4) any action to interpret, apply, enforce or determine the validity of our amended and restated certificate of incorporation or our amended and restated bylaws, or (5)any action asserting a claim governed by the internal affairs doctrine. Under our amended and restated certificate of incorporation, this exclusive forum provision will not apply to claims which are vested in the exclusive jurisdiction of a court orforum other than the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware, or for which the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware does not have subject matter jurisdiction. For instance, the provision would not apply to actions arising under federalsecurities laws, including suits brought to enforce any liability or duty created by the Securities Act, the Exchange Act, or the rules and regulations thereunder. This exclusive forum provision may

 

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limit a stockholder’s ability to bring a claim in a judicial forum that it finds favorable for disputes with us or our directors, officers or other employees, which may discourage suchlawsuits against us and our directors, officers and other employees. For example, stockholders who do bring a claim in the Court of Chancery could face additional litigation costs in pursuing any such claim, particularly if they do not reside in ornear the State of Delaware. The Court of Chancery may also reach different judgments or results than would other courts, including courts where a stockholder considering an action may be located or would otherwise choose to bring the action, andsuch judgments or results may be more favorable to us than to our stockholders. The enforceability of similar choice of forum provisions in other companies’ certificates of incorporation has been challenged in legal proceedings, and it ispossible that, in connection with any applicable action brought against us, a court could find the choice of forum provisions contained in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation to be inapplicable or unenforceable in such action. If acourt were to find the choice of forum provisions contained in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation to be inapplicable or unenforceable in an action, we may incur additional costs associated with resolving such action in otherjurisdictions, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations.

Because we do not anticipate paying anycash dividends on our capital stock in the foreseeable future, capital appreciation, if any, will be your sole source of gain.

Wehave never declared or paid cash dividends on our capital stock. We currently intend to retain all of our future earnings, if any, to finance the growth and development of our business. Additionally, the proposal to pay future dividends tostockholders will in addition effectively be at the sole discretion of our board of directors after taking into account various factors our board of directors deems relevant, including our business prospects, capital requirements, financialperformance and new product development. As a result, capital appreciation, if any, of our common stock will be your sole source of gain for the foreseeable future.

 

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SPECIAL NOTE REGARDINGFORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This prospectus containsforward-looking statements. All statements other than statements of historical facts contained in this prospectus are forward-looking statements. In some cases, you canidentify forward-looking statements by terms such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “expect,” “plan,” “anticipate,” “could,” “intend,”“target,” “project,” “contemplate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “predict,” “potential” or “continue” or the negative of these terms or other similar expressions, although notall forward-looking statements contain these words. Forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements concerning:

 

  

our plans to develop and commercialize our product candidates;

 

  

the timing of our ongoing or planned clinical trials for GC4419, GC4711 and our other product candidates;

 

  

the timing of our NDA submission for GC4419 for the reduction of the incidence of SOM induced by radiotherapywith or without systemic therapy;

 

  

the timing of and our ability to obtain and maintain regulatory approvals for GC4419, GC4711 and our otherproduct candidates;

 

  

the clinical utility of our product candidates;

 

  

our commercialization, marketing and manufacturing capabilities and strategy;

 

  

our expectations about the willingness of healthcare professionals to use GC4419, GC4711 and our other productcandidates;

 

  

our intellectual property position;

 

  

our expected use of proceeds from this offering;

 

  

our competitive position and the development of and projections relating to our competitors or our industry;

 

  

our ability to identify, recruit and retain key personnel;

 

  

the impact of laws and regulations;

 

  

our expectations regarding the time during which we will be an emerging growth company under the JOBS Act;

 

  

our plans to identify additional product candidates with significant commercial potential that are consistentwith our commercial objectives; and

 

  

our estimates regarding future revenue, expenses and needs for additional financing.

The forward-looking statements in this prospectus are only predictions and are based largely on ourcurrent expectations and projections about future events and financial trends that we believe may affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. These forward-looking statements speak onlyas of the date of this prospectus and are subject to a number of known and unknown risks, uncertainties and assumptions, including those described under the sections in this prospectus entitled “Risk Factors” and “Management’sDiscussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

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Because forward-looking statements are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties, some of which cannot be predicted or quantified and some of which arebeyond our control, you should not rely on these forward-looking statements as predictions of future events. The events and circumstances reflected in ourforward-looking statements may not be achieved or occur and actual results could differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements. Moreover, weoperate in an evolving environment. New risk factors and uncertainties may emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for management to predict all risk factors and uncertainties. Except as required by applicable law, we do not plan topublicly update or revise any forward-looking statements contained herein, whether as a result of any new information, future events, changed circumstances or otherwise. Theforward-looking statements contained in this prospectus are excluded from the safe harbor protection provided by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and Section 27A of the Securities Actof 1933, as amended.

 

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MARKET AND INDUSTRY DATA

Unless otherwise indicated, information contained in this prospectus concerning our industry and the markets in which we operate, includingour general expectations, market position and market opportunity, is based on our management’s estimates and research, as well as industry and general publications and research, surveys and studies conducted by third parties. While we believethese publications, research surveys and studies to be reliable, we have not independently verified data from the third party sources. Management’s estimates are derived from publicly available information, their knowledge of our industry andtheir assumptions based on such information and knowledge, which we believe to be reasonable. This data involves a number of assumptions and limitations which are necessarily subject to a high degree of uncertainty and risk due to a variety offactors, including those described in “Risk Factors.” These and other factors could cause our future performance to differ materially from our assumptions and estimates.

 

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USE OF PROCEEDS

We estimate that the net proceeds to us from this offering will be approximately$                 million, assuming an initial public offering price of $                per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus and after deducting the estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. If the underwriters’option to purchase additional shares from us is exercised in full, we estimate that our net proceeds will be approximately $                 million.

Each $1.00 increase or decrease in the assumed initial public offering price of$                 per share would increase or decrease the net proceeds to us from this offering by approximately$                 million, assuming the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, remains the same and after deducting theestimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. Each increase or decrease of 1.0 million in the number of shares we are offering would increase or decrease the net proceeds to us from thisoffering by approximately $                 million, assuming the assumed initial public offering price stays the same, and after deducting the estimated underwritingdiscounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us.

We intend to use the net proceeds from this offering, togetherwith our existing cash resources, as follows:

 

  

approximately$                 million to advance the clinical development of GC4419 for the reduction of SOM in patients with HNC receiving radiotherapy, including to completeour ongoing ROMAN trial, seek regulatory approval and fund pre-commercialization activities and the commercial launch, if approved, of GC4419;

 

  

approximately$                 million to advance the clinical development of GC4419 for the reduction of the incidence of radiotherapy-induced esophagitis, including to fundour planned Phase 2a trial;

 

  

approximately$                 million to advance the clinical development of GC4711 to increase the anti-cancer efficacy of SBRT, including to fund our planned Phase 1b/2atrial in patients with NSCLC; and

 

  

the remainder to fund new and ongoing research and development activities, including to develop additionaldismutase mimetics and an oral formulation of GC4711, and for working capital and other general corporate purposes.

Asof the date of this prospectus, we cannot estimate with certainty the amount of net proceeds to be used for the purposes described above. This expected use of the net proceeds from this offering represents our intentions based upon our current plansand business conditions, which could change in the future as our plans and business conditions evolve. We may also use a portion of the net proceeds from this offering to acquire, in-license or invest inproducts, technologies or businesses that are complementary to our business. However, we currently have no agreements or commitments to complete any such transaction. We may find it necessary or advisable to use the net proceeds for other purposes,and we will have broad discretion in the application of the net proceeds.

We anticipate that our existing cash, cash equivalents andshort-term investments, together with the anticipated net proceeds from this offering, will be sufficient to fund our operating expenses and capital expenditure requirements into                . We have based this estimate on assumptions that may prove to be wrong, and we could utilize our available capital resources sooner than we expect.Following this offering, we will require substantial capital to complete clinical development, seek regulatory approval of, and, if approved, commercialize our product candidates. We may satisfy our future cash needs through the sale of equitysecurities, debt financings, working capital lines of credit, corporate collaborations or license agreements, grant funding, interest income earned on invested cash balances or a combination of one or more of these sources.

Pending the use of the proceeds described above, we plan to invest the net proceeds from this offering in short- and intermediate-term,interest-bearing obligations, investment-grade instruments, certificates of deposit or direct or guaranteed obligations of the U.S. government.

 

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DIVIDEND POLICY

We have never declared or paid any dividends on our capital stock. We currently intend to retain all available funds and any future earnings,if any, for the operation and expansion of our business and, therefore, we do not anticipate declaring or paying cash dividends in the foreseeable future. The payment of dividends, if any, will be at the discretion of our board of directors and willdepend on our results of operations, capital requirements, financial condition, prospects, contractual arrangements, any limitations on payment of dividends present in our future debt agreements, and other factors that our board of directors maydeem relevant. Our ability to pay cash dividends on our capital stock in the future may also be limited by the terms of any preferred securities we may issue or agreements governing any additional indebtedness we may incur.

 

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CAPITALIZATION

The following table sets forth our cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments and ourcapitalization as of June 30, 2019 on:

 

  

an actual basis;

 

  

a pro forma basis to reflect (1) the automatic conversion of all outstanding shares of our redeemableconvertible preferred stock into an aggregate of 96,385,795 shares of common stock upon the completion of this offering, and (2) the effectiveness of our amended and restated certificate of incorporation; and

 

  

a pro forma as adjusted basis to reflect the pro forma adjustments described above, and giving further effect tothe sale of                shares of our common stock in this offering at an assumed initial public offering price of$                per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, after deducting estimated underwriting discounts andcommissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us.

Our capitalization following the closing of this offeringwill be adjusted based on the actual initial public offering price and other terms of this offering determined at pricing. You should read this information in conjunction with our financial statements and the related notes appearing at the end ofthis prospectus, the information set forth under the headings “Use of Proceeds,” “Selected Consolidated Financial Data” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations”and the other financial information contained in this prospectus.

 

   As of June 30, 2019 
   Actual  Pro Forma  Pro Forma
As
Adjusted(1)
 
      (unaudited)  (unaudited) 
   (in thousands, except share and
per share data)
 

Cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments

  $81,277  $81,277  $                  
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Royalty purchase liability

  $41,395  $41,395  $                  

Redeemable convertible preferred stock, $0.001 par value per share; 96,385,795 shares authorized,issued and outstanding, actual; no shares authorized, issued or outstanding, pro forma and pro forma as adjusted

   169,973   —    
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Stockholders’ (deficit) equity:

    

Preferred stock, $0.001 par value per share; no shares authorized, issued and outstanding, actual;10,000,000 shares authorized, no shares issued or outstanding, pro forma and pro forma as adjusted

   —     —    

Common stock, $0.001 par value per share; 117,000,000 shares authorized, 1,520,000 shares issuedand outstanding, actual; 200,000,000 shares authorized, 97,905,795 shares issued and outstanding, pro forma; 200,000,000 shares authorized,                 sharesissued and outstanding, pro forma as adjusted

   2   98  

Additional paid-in capital

   —     169,877  

Accumulated other comprehensive income

   81   81  

Accumulated deficit

   (129,739  (129,739 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total stockholders’ (deficit) equity

   (129,656  40,317  
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total capitalization

  $81,712  $81,712  $                  
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

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(1)

The pro forma as adjusted information is illustrative only and will change based on the actual initial publicoffering price and other terms of this offering determined at pricing. Each $1.00 increase or decrease in the assumed initial public offering price of$                per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, would increase or decrease pro forma as adjustedcash, cash equivalents and short-term investments, additional paid-in capital, total stockholders’ (deficit) equity and total capitalization by approximately$                million, assuming that the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, remains the same, and after deductingestimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. We may also increase or decrease the number of shares we are offering. A 1,000,000 share increase or decrease in the number of shares offered by us wouldincrease or decrease pro forma as adjusted cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments, additional paid-in capital, total stockholders’ (deficit) equity and total capitalization by approximately$                million, assuming that the assumed initial price to public remains the same, and after deducting estimated underwriting discounts and commissionspayable by us.

The number of shares of our common stock shown as issued and outstanding in the table above is based on97,905,795 shares of common stock outstanding as of June 30, 2019, after giving effect to the automatic conversion of all outstanding shares of our redeemable convertible preferred stock into shares of our common stock immediately prior to theclosing of this offering, and excludes:

 

  

15,824,928 shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of options outstanding as of June 30, 2019, at aweighted-average exercise price of $0.77 per share;

 

  

2,323,905 shares of common stock reserved for future issuance as of June 30, 2019 pursuant to our Existing EquityIncentive Plan;

 

  

                shares of commonstock reserved for future issuance pursuant to our 2019 Plan, which will become effective on the day prior to the first public trading date of our common stock; and

 

  

                 shares of commonstock reserved for future issuance pursuant to the 2019 ESPP, which will become effective on the day prior to the first public trading date of our common stock.

 

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DILUTION

If you invest in our common stock, your interest will be diluted to the extent of the difference between the initial public offering price pershare of our common stock and the pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per share of our common stock immediately after the completion of this offering.

Our historical net tangible book value (deficit) as of June 30, 2019 was $(134.5) million, or $(88.51) per share of common stock. Ourhistorical net tangible book value (deficit) per share represents our total tangible assets (total assets less intangible assets, goodwill and deferred offering costs) less our total liabilities and redeemable convertible preferred stock (which isnot included within stockholders’ deficit), divided by the number of shares of common stock outstanding as of June 30, 2019.

Our proforma net tangible book value as of June 30, 2019 was $35.4 million, or $0.36 per share of common stock. Pro forma net tangible book value per share represents our total tangible assets less our total liabilities, divided by the number ofshares of common stock outstanding as of June 30, 2019, after giving effect to the automatic conversion of all of our outstanding shares of redeemable convertible preferred stock into 96,385,795 shares of common stock upon the completion of thisoffering.

Our pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value represents our pro forma net tangible book value, plus the effect of the saleof                shares of common stock in this offering at an assumed initial public offering price of$                per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, after deducting estimated underwriting discounts andcommissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. Our pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value as of June 30, 2019 was $             million, or$                per share of common stock. This amount represents an immediate increase in pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value of$                per share to our existing stockholders and an immediate dilution of$                per share to investors participating in this offering. We determine dilution per share to investors participating in this offering by subtracting proforma as adjusted net tangible book value per share after this offering from the assumed initial public offering price per share paid by investors participating in this offering.

The following table illustrates this dilution on a per share basis:

 

Assumed initial public offering price per share

   $                  

Historical net tangible book value (deficit) per share as of June 30, 2019

  $(88.51 

Increase per share attributable to the pro forma transactions described above

   88.87  
  

 

 

  

Pro forma net tangible book value per share as of June 30, 2019

   0.36  
  

 

 

  

Increase in pro forma net tangible book value per share attributable to new investors purchasingshares from us in this offering

   
  

 

 

  

Pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per share after this offering

   
   

 

 

 

Dilution per share to new investors in this offering

   $  
   

 

 

 

Each $1.00 increase or decrease in the assumed initial public offering price of$                per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, would increase or decrease the pro forma as adjustednet tangible book value per share after this offering by $                per share and the dilution per share to investors participating in this offering by$                per share, assuming that the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, remains the same and after deductingestimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. A 1,000,000 share increase in the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, would increase the pro forma asadjusted net tangible book value per share by $                and decrease the dilution per share to investors participating in this offering by$                , assuming the assumed initial public offering price of$                per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus,

 

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remains the same and after deducting estimated underwriting discounts and commissions payable by us. A 1,000,000 share decrease in the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the coverpage of this prospectus, would decrease the pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per share after this offering by $                and increase the dilution pershare to new investors participating in this offering by $                , assuming the assumed initial public offering price of$                per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, remains the same and after deducting estimatedunderwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. The pro forma as adjusted information discussed above is illustrative only and will adjust based on the actual initial price to public and other terms of thisoffering determined at pricing.

If the underwriters exercise their option to purchase anadditional                shares of our common stock in this offering in full, the pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value of our common stock would increase to$                per share, representing an immediate increase to existing stockholders of$                per share and an immediate dilution of $                per share to newinvestors participating in this offering.

The following table summarizes as of June 30, 2019, on the pro forma as adjusted basisdescribed above, the number of shares of our common stock, the total consideration and the average price per share (1) paid to us by our existing stockholders and (2) to be paid by investors purchasing our common stock in this offering atan assumed initial public offering price of $                per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, beforededucting estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us.

 

   Shares Purchased  Total
Consideration
  Average Price
Per Share
 
   Number   Percent  Amount   Percent 

Existing stockholders

                                        $                                      $                  

New investors

        
  

 

 

   

 

 

  

 

 

   

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total

     100 $     100 
  

 

 

   

 

 

  

 

 

   

 

 

  

Each $1.00 increase or decrease in the assumed initial public offering price of$                per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, would increase or decrease the total considerationpaid by new investors and the average price per share paid by new investors by $                million and$                per share, respectively. An increase or decrease of 1.0 million shares in the number of shares offered by us would increase or decrease theconsideration paid by new investors and the average price per share paid by new investors by $                million and$                per share, respectively.

If theunderwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares of our common stock in full, the total consideration paid by new investors and the average price per share paid by new investors would be approximately$                million and $                per share, respectively, in each caseassuming an initial public offering price of $                per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus.

The tables and calculations above are based on 97,905,795 shares of common stock outstanding as of June 30, 2019, after giving effect tothe automatic conversion of all outstanding shares of our redeemable convertible preferred stock into shares of our common stock immediately prior to the closing of this offering, and excludes:

 

  

15,824,928 shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of options outstanding as of June 30,2019, at a weighted-average exercise price of $0.77 per share;

 

  

2,323,905 shares of common stock reserved for future issuance as of June 30, 2019 pursuant to our Existing EquityIncentive Plan;

 

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                shares of commonstock reserved for future issuance pursuant to our 2019 Plan, which will become effective on the day prior to the first public trading date of our common stock; and

 

  

                shares of commonstock reserved for future issuance pursuant to the 2019 ESPP, which will become effective on the day prior to the first public trading date of our common stock.

To the extent that any outstanding options are exercised, new options or other securities are issued under our equity incentive plans, or weissue additional shares of common stock in the future, there will be further dilution to investors participating in this offering. In addition, we may choose to raise additional capital because of market conditions or strategic considerations, evenif we believe that we have sufficient funds for our current or future operating plans. If we raise additional capital through the sale of equity or convertible debt securities, the issuance of these securities could result in further dilution to ourstockholders.

 

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SELECTED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

We derived the selected consolidated statements of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2018 and the selectedconsolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2017 and 2018 from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. We derived the selected consolidated statements of operations data for the six monthsended June 30, 2018 and 2019 and the selected consolidated balance sheet data as of June 30, 2019 from our unaudited consolidated interim financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. In our opinion, the unaudited interim consolidatedfinancial statements have been prepared on a basis consistent with our audited consolidated financial statements and contains all adjustments, consisting only of normal and recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair presentation of such interimfinancial statements. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected in the future and our operating results for the six months ended June 30, 2019 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may beexpected for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2019 or any other interim periods or any future year or period.

When you read thisselected consolidated financial data, it is important that you read it together with the historical audited consolidated financial statements and related notes, as well as the section titled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis ofFinancial Condition and Results of Operations,” each as included elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

   Year ended December 31,  Six Months Ended June 30, 
   2017  2018  2018  2019 
   (in thousands, except share and per share data) 

Consolidated Statements of Operations Data:

     

Operating expenses:

     

Research and development

  $20,594  $18,663  $7,389  $18,017 

General and administrative

   3,500   5,592   2,601   3,650 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Loss from operations

   (24,094  (24,255  (9,990  (21,667

Other income (expenses):

     

Interest income

   193   606   53   970 

Interest expense

   —     (220  —     (1,175

Foreign currency loss

   (4  (30  (16  (35
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Loss from operations before income tax benefit

   (23,905  (23,889  (9,953  (21,907

Income tax benefit

   360   223   89   —   
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net loss

   (23,545  (23,676  (9,864  (21,907

Accretion of redeemable convertible preferred stock to redemption value

   (4,588  (5,910  (2,411  (4,071
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net loss attributable to common stockholders

  $(28,133 $(29,586 $(12,275 $(25,978
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net loss per share of common stock, basic and diluted(1)

  $(18.51 $(19.46 $(8.08 $(17.09
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Weighted-average shares of common stock outstanding, basic and diluted(1)

   1,520,000   1,520,000   1,520,000   1,520,000 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Pro forma net loss per share of common stock, basic and diluted (unaudited)(1)

   $(0.31  $(0.22
   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Pro forma weighted-average shares of common stock outstanding, basic and diluted(unaudited)(1)

    76,977,463    97,905,795 
   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(1)

See Note 2 to our consolidated audited financial statements and Note 2 to our unaudited interimconsolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus for an explanation of the method used to calculate our historical and pro forma basic and diluted net loss per share of common stock.

 

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   As of December 31,   As of June 30, 
   2017   2018   2019 
   (in thousands) 

Consolidated Balance Sheet Data:

      

Cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments

  $14,180   $81,517   $81,277 

Working capital(1)

   10,872    77,408    75,596 

Total assets

   18,872    88,056    91,043 

Royalty purchase liability

   —      20,220    41,395 

Redeemable convertible preferred stock

   90,148    165,902    169,973 

Total stockholders’ deficit

   (76,105   (104,820   (129,656

 

(1)

We define working capital as current assets less current liabilities.

 

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MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIALCONDITION AND

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

You should read the following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations together with our consolidatedfinancial statements and the related notes and other financial information included elsewhere in this prospectus. Some of the information contained in this discussion and analysis contains forward-looking statements that involve risks anduncertainties. You should review the section titled “Risk Factors” in this prospectus for a discussion of important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the results described below.

Overview

We are a clinical stagebiopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing a pipeline of novel, proprietary therapeutics that have the potential to transform radiotherapy in cancer. We leverage our expertise in superoxide dismutase mimetics to design drugsto reduce normal tissue toxicity from radiotherapy and to increase the anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy. Our lead product candidate, GC4419, is a potent and highly selective small molecule dismutase mimetic we are initially developing for thereduction of SOM. SOM is a common, debilitating complication of radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer, or HNC. In February 2018, the FDA granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation to GC4419 for the reduction of the duration, incidence andseverity of SOM induced by radiotherapy with or without systemic therapy. In October 2018, we began evaluating GC4419 in a Phase 3 registrational trial and we expect to report top-line data from this trial inthe first half of 2021. We believe GC4419, which to date is not approved for any indication, has the potential to be the first FDA-approved drug and the standard of care for the reduction in the incidence ofSOM in patients with HNC receiving radiotherapy, and we plan to further evaluate its use in other radiotherapy-induced toxicities, including esophagitis.

Since our inception, we have devoted substantially all of our resources to organizing and staffing our company, business planning, raisingcapital, acquiring and developing product and technology rights, and conducting research and development. We have incurred recurring losses and negative cash flows from operations and have funded our operations primarily through the sale andissuance of redeemable convertible preferred stock and proceeds received under the Royalty Agreement with Clarus, receiving aggregate gross proceeds of $187.8 million. Our ability to generate product revenue sufficient to achieve profitabilitywill depend heavily on the successful development and eventual commercialization of one or more of our current or future product candidates. Our net loss was $23.5 million and $23.7 million for the years ended December 31, 2017and 2018, respectively, and $9.9 million and $21.9 million for the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2019, respectively. As of June 30, 2019, we had $81.3 million in cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments and anaccumulated deficit of $129.7 million. We expect to continue to incur significant expenses and operating losses for the foreseeable future as we advance our product candidates through all stages of development and clinical trials and,ultimately, seek regulatory approval. In addition, if we obtain marketing approval for any of our product candidates, we expect to incur significant commercialization expenses related to product manufacturing, marketing, sales and distribution.Furthermore, upon the closing of this offering, we expect to incur additional costs associated with operating as a public company, including significant legal, accounting, investor relations and other expenses that we did not incur as a privatecompany.

As a result, we will need to raise substantial additional capital to support our continuing operations and pursue our growthstrategy. Until such time as we can generate significant revenue from product sales, if ever, we plan to finance our operations through the sale of equity, debt financings or other capital sources, which may include collaborations with othercompanies or other strategic transactions. There are no assurances that we will be successful in obtaining an adequate level of financing as and when needed to finance our operations on terms acceptable to us or at all. If we are unable to secureadequate additional funding as and when needed, we may have to significantly delay, scale back or discontinue the development and commercialization of one or more product candidates or delay our pursuit of potentialin-licenses or acquisitions.

 

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Because of the numerous risks and uncertainties associated with product development, we areunable to predict the timing or amount of increased expenses or when or if we will be able to achieve or maintain profitability. Even if we are able to generate product sales, we may not become profitable. If we fail to become profitable or areunable to sustain profitability on a continuing basis, then we may be unable to continue our operations at planned levels and be forced to reduce or terminate our operations.

We expect our existing cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments, together with the net proceeds from this offering, will enable us tofund our operating expenses and capital expenditure requirements into                 . See “Use of Proceeds.”

Components of Results of Operations

Research andDevelopment Expense

Research and development expenses consist primarily of costs incurred in connection with the discovery anddevelopment of our product candidates. We expense research and development costs as incurred. These expenses include:

 

  

expenses incurred to conduct the necessary pre-clinical studies and clinical trials required to obtain regulatoryapproval;

 

  

personnel expenses, including salaries, benefits and share-based compensation expense for employees engaged inresearch and development functions;

 

  

costs of funding research performed by third parties, including pursuant to agreements with CROs, as well asinvestigative sites and consultants that conduct our pre-clinical studies and clinical trials;

 

  

expenses incurred under agreements with CMOs, including manufacturingscale-up expenses and the cost of acquiring and manufacturing pre-clinical study and clinical trial materials;

 

  

fees paid to consultants who assist with research and development activities;

 

  

expenses related to regulatory activities, including filing fees paid to regulatory agencies; and

 

  

allocated expenses for facility costs, including rent, utilities, depreciation and maintenance.

We track our external research and development expenses on a program-by-program basis, such as fees paid to CROs, CMOs and research laboratories in connection with our pre-clinical development, process development, manufacturing and clinical development activities.However, we do not track our internal research and development expenses on a program-by-program basis as they primarily relate to compensation, early research and othercosts which are deployed across multiple projects under development.

The following table summarizes our research and development expensesby program for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2018 and for the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2019:

 

   

Yearended
December 31,

   Six months ended
June 30,
 
   2017   2018   2018   2019 
   (in thousands)         

GC4419

  $12,610   $10,812   $3,838   $11,404 

GC4711

   2,670    2,696    964    2,474 

Other research and development expense

   1,830    765    334    1,111 

Personnel related and share-based compensation expense

   3,484    4,390    2,253    3,028 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
  $20,594   $18,663   $7,389   $18,017 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Research and development activities are central to our business model. Product candidates inlater stages of clinical development, such as GC4419, generally have higher development costs than those in earlier stages of clinical development, primarily due to the increased size and duration of later-stage clinical trials. We expect ourresearch and development expenses to increase significantly over the next several years as we increase personnel costs, including stock-based compensation, conduct our later-stage clinical trials for GC4419 and GC4711 and conduct other clinicaltrials for current and future product candidates and prepare regulatory filings for our product candidates.

The successful development ofour product candidates is highly uncertain. At this time, we cannot reasonably estimate or know the nature, timing and costs of the efforts that will be necessary to complete the remainder of the development of our product candidates, or when, ifever, material net cash inflows may commence from our product candidates. This uncertainty is due to the numerous risks and uncertainties associated with the duration and cost of clinical trials, which vary significantly over the life of a projectas a result of many factors, including:

 

  

delays in regulators or institutional review boards authorizing us or our investigators to commence our clinicaltrials, or in our ability to negotiate agreements with clinical trial sites or CROs;

 

  

our ability to secure adequate supply of our product candidates for our trials;

 

  

the number of clinical sites included in the trials;

 

  

the ability and the length of time required to enroll suitable patients;

 

  

the number of patients that ultimately participate in the trials;

 

  

the number of doses patients receive;

 

  

any side effects associated with our product candidates;

 

  

the duration of patient follow-up;

 

  

the results of our clinical trials;

 

  

significant and changing government regulations; and

 

  

launching commercial sales of our product candidates, if and when approved, whether alone or in collaborationwith others.

Our expenditures are subject to additional uncertainties, including the terms and timing of regulatoryapprovals. We may never succeed in achieving regulatory approval for our product candidates. We may obtain unexpected results from our clinical trials. We may elect to discontinue, delay or modify clinical trials of our product candidates. A changein the outcome of any of these variables with respect to the development of a product candidate could mean a significant change in the costs and timing associated with the development of that product candidate. For example, if the FDA or otherregulatory authorities were to require us to conduct clinical trials beyond those that we currently anticipate, or if we experience significant delays in enrollment in any of our clinical trials, we could be required to expend significant additionalfinancial resources and time on the completion of clinical development. Product commercialization will take several years, and we expect to spend a significant amount in development costs.

General and Administrative Expense

General and administrative expense consists primarily of personnel expenses, including salaries, benefits and share-based compensationexpense, for employees in executive, finance, accounting, business

 

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development and human resource functions. General and administrative expense also includes corporate facility costs, including rent, utilities, depreciation and maintenance, not otherwiseincluded in research and development expense, as well as legal fees related to intellectual property and corporate matters and fees for accounting and consulting services.

We expect that our general and administrative expense will increase in the future to support our continued research and developmentactivities, potential commercialization efforts and increased costs of operating as a public company. These increases will likely include increased costs related to the hiring of additional personnel and fees to outside consultants, lawyers andaccountants, among other expenses. Additionally, we anticipate increased costs associated with being a public company, including expenses related to services associated with maintaining compliance with the requirements of Nasdaq and the SEC,insurance and investor relations costs. If any of our current or future product candidates obtains U.S. regulatory approval, we expect that we would incur significantly increased expenses associated with building a sales and marketing team.

Interest Income

Interest incomeconsists of amounts earned on our cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments held with large institutional banks, U.S. Treasury obligations and a money market mutual fund invested in U.S. Treasury obligations, and our short-term investmentsin U.S. Treasury obligations.

Interest Expense

Interest expense consists of non-cash interest on proceeds received under the Royalty Agreement withClarus.

Foreign Currency Losses

Foreign currency losses consist primarily of exchange rate fluctuations on transactions denominated in a currency other than the U.S. dollar.

Income Tax Benefit

Sinceinception, we have incurred significant net losses, and until 2017 we had not recorded any U.S. federal or state income tax benefits for the losses as they had been offset by valuation allowances. We recognized an income tax benefit forthe revaluation of our deferred tax liability as a result of the Tax Act, which reduced our corporate tax rate to 21% during the year ended December 31, 2017. As a result of the change in the net operating loss carryforward period associatedwith the Tax Act, we recognized an income tax benefit to utilize indefinite deferred tax liabilities as a source of income against indefinite lived portions of our deferred tax assets during the year ended December 31, 2018.

Net Operating Loss and Research and Development Tax Credit Carryforwards

As of December 31, 2018, we had federal and state tax net operating loss carryforwards of $64.5 million and $81.8 million,respectively, which each begin to expire in 2032 unless previously utilized. We also had foreign net operating loss carryforwards of $0.8 million which begin to expire in 2032. As of December 31, 2018, we also had federal and stateresearch and development tax credit carryforwards of $2.3 million. The federal research and development tax credit carryforwards will begin to expire in 2032 unless previously utilized.

Utilization of the federal and state net operating losses and credits may be subject to a substantial annual limitation. The annual limitationmay result in the expiration of our net operating losses and credits before we can use them. We have recorded a valuation allowance on substantially all of our deferred tax assets, including our deferred tax assets related to our net operating lossand research and development tax credit carryforwards.

 

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Results of Operations

Comparison of the Six Months Ended June 30, 2018 and 2019

The following table sets forth our results of operations for the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2019.

 

   

Six Months Ended June 30,

 
         2018               2019       
   (unaudited) 

Operating expenses:

    

Research and development

  $7,389   $18,017 

General and administrative

   2,601    3,650 
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from operations

   (9,990   (21,667

Other income (expense):

    

Interest income

   53    970 

Interest expense

   —      (1,175

Foreign exchange loss

   (16   (35
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss before income tax benefit

   (9,953   (21,907

Income tax benefit

   89    —   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

  $(9,864  $(21,907
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Research and Development Expense

Research and development expense increased by $10.6 million from $7.4 million for the six months ended June 30, 2018 to$18.0 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019. The increase was primarily attributable to increases of $7.6 million and $1.5 million for GC4419 and GC4711 development costs, respectively, as we initiated our ROMAN trial inOctober 2018 and began additional toxicology studies of GC4419 and began a new clinical trial and additional toxicology studies of GC4711. We also had an increase in other research and development expenses of $0.8 million due to increasedregulatory and facility costs and a $0.2 million reserve against our tax incentive receivable. Personnel related and share-based compensation expense increased by $0.8 million primarily due to increases in employee headcount.

General and Administrative Expense

General and administrative expense increased by $1.1 million from $2.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2018 to$3.7 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019. The increase was primarily due to an increase in employee-related costs as we increased our employee headcount to support our growth.

Interest Income

Interest incomeincreased by $0.9 million from $53,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2018 to $0.9 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019. The increase was primarily due to higher average invested cash balances and higher interestrates on U.S. Treasury securities in 2019.

Interest Expense

We recognized $1.2 million in non-cash interest expense during the six months ended June 30,2019 in connection with the Royalty Agreement with Clarus.

 

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Income Tax Benefit

We recorded an income tax benefit of $89,000 during the six months ended June 30, 2018 as a result of the change in the net operatingloss carryforward period to reflect the adjustment allowed by the Tax Act to utilize indefinite deferred tax liabilities as a source of income against indefinite lived portions of our deferred tax assets.

Comparison of the Years Ended December 31, 2017 and 2018

The following table sets forth our results of operations for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2018.

 

   

Year ended December 31,

 
   2017   2018 
   (in thousands) 

Operating expenses:

    

Research and development

  $20,594   $18,663 

General and administrative

   3,500    5,592 
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from operations

   (24,094   (24,255

Other income (expenses):

    

Interest income

   193    606 

Interest expense

   —      (220

Foreign currency loss

   (4   (30
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss from operations before income tax benefit

   (23,905   (23,899

Income tax benefit

   360    223 
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

  $(23,545  $(23,676
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Research and Development Expense

Research and development expense decreased by $1.9 million from $20.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2017 to$18.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2018. The decrease was primarily attributable to a $1.8 million decrease for GC4419 development costs as we substantially completed our Phase 2 clinical trial by the end of fiscal2017. We also had $1.1 million in other research and development expenses in 2017 that did not recur in 2018 as we focused on preparing for our Phase 3 clinical trial for GC4419. These decreases were primarily offset by a $0.9 millionincrease in personnel related and share-based compensation expense due to increases in employee compensation and related costs and the increase in the number of consultants we engaged in 2018 as we increased our development activities.

General and Administrative Expense

General and administrative expense increased by $2.1 million from $3.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2017 to$5.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2018. The increase was primarily due to marketing studies for our product candidates, and an increase in professional fees.

Interest Income

Interest incomeincreased by $0.4 million from $0.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2017 to $0.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2018. The increase was primarily due to higher average invested cash balances and higherinterest rates on U.S. Treasury securities in 2018.

Interest Expense

We recognized $0.2 million in non-cash interest expense during the year ended December 31,2018 in connection with the Royalty Agreement with Clarus.

 

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Income Tax Benefit

As a result of the change in the corporate tax rate associated with the Tax Act, we recognized an income tax benefit of $0.4 millionduring the year ended December 31, 2017. We recorded an income tax benefit of $0.2 million during the year ended December 31, 2018 as a result of the change in the net operating loss carryforward period to reflect the adjustmentallowed by the Tax Act to utilize indefinite deferred tax liabilities as a source of income against indefinite lived portions of our deferred tax assets.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Sinceinception, we have funded our operations primarily through the sale and issuance of redeemable convertible preferred stock and proceeds received under the Royalty Agreement with Clarus, receiving aggregate gross proceeds of $187.8 million. Asof June 30, 2019, we had $81.3 million in cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments and an accumulated deficit of $129.7 million. We have no ongoing material financing commitments, such as lines of credit or guarantees, thatare expected to affect our liquidity over the next five years.

Cash Flows

The following table shows a summary of our cash flows for the periods indicated:

 

   Year ended December 31,  Six months ended June 30, 
        2017            2018             2018              2019       
   (in thousands) 

Net cash used in operating activities

  $(23,406 $(22,166 $(10,490 $(18,484

Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities

   23,512   (59,036  7,986   1,195 

Net cash provided by financing activities

   —     89,844   —     18,673 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

  $106  $8,642  $(2,504 $1,384 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Operating Activities

During the six months ended June 30, 2018, we used $10.5 million of net cash in operating activities. Cash used in operatingactivities reflected our net loss of $9.9 million and a $1.1 million net increase in our operating assets and liabilities. The primary use of cash was to fund our operations related to the development of our product candidates. Theseactivities were offset by non-cash charges of $0.5 million principally related to share-based compensation expense and depreciation expense.

During the six months ended June 30, 2019, we used $18.5 million of net cash in operating activities. Cash used in operatingactivities reflected our net loss of $21.9 million offset by non-cash charges of $2.6 million principally related to share-based compensation, interest expense on our Royalty Agreement with Clarusand depreciation expense.

During the year ended December 31, 2017, we used $23.4 million of net cash in operating activities.Cash used in operating activities reflected our net loss of $23.5 million and a $0.7 million net increase in our operating assets and liabilities. The primary use of cash was to fund our operations related to the development of our productcandidates. These activities were offset by non-cash charges of $0.8 million principally related to stock-based compensation expense and depreciation expense.

During the year ended December 31, 2018, we used $22.2 million of net cash in operating activities. Cash used in operatingactivities reflected our net loss of $23.7 million and a $0.3 million net increase in our operating assets and liabilities. These activities were offset by non-cash charges of $1.2 millionrelated to share-based compensation, interest expense on our Royalty Agreement with Clarus and depreciation expense.

 

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Investing Activities

During the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2019, investing activities provided $8.0 million and $1.2 million in net cashproceeds, respectively, and were primarily attributable to the $8.0 million and $1.7 million in net cash proceeds received from the purchases and sales of our short-term investments, respectively. These activities were offset by $28,000and $0.5 million for the purchase of property and equipment during the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2019, respectively.

During the year ended December 31, 2017, investing activities provided $23.5 million in net cash proceeds and were primarilyattributable to the $23.8 million in net cash proceeds received from the purchases and sales of our short-term investments that were offset by the $0.3 million for the purchase of property and equipment.

During the year ended December 31, 2018, we used $59.0 million of net cash in investing activities, primarily attributable to the$58.7 million in net purchases of our short-term investments and $0.3 million for the purchase of property and equipment.

FinancingActivities

There were no cash flows from financing activities during the year ended December 31, 2017 and during the six monthsended June 30, 2018.

During the six months ended June 30, 2019, financing activities provided $18.7 million in net cashproceeds, primarily attributable to the $20.0 million in proceeds received in connection with the Royalty Agreement with Clarus. We also paid $1.3 million in deferred offering costs in connection with our anticipated public offering of ourcommon stock.

During the year ended December 31, 2018, financing activities provided $89.8 million in net cash proceeds,primarily attributable to $69.8 million in net proceeds from the sale of our Series C redeemable convertible preferred stock and $20.0 million in proceeds received in connection with the Royalty Agreement with Clarus.

Funding Requirements

We expectour expenses to increase in connection with our ongoing activities, particularly as we continue the research and development of, continue or initiate clinical trials of, and seek marketing approval for, our product candidates. In addition, if weobtain marketing approval for any of our product candidates, we expect to incur significant commercialization expenses related to product sales, marketing, manufacturing and distribution. Furthermore, following the completion of this offering, weexpect to incur additional costs associated with operating as a public company. Accordingly, we will need to obtain substantial additional funding in connection with our continuing operations. If we are unable to raise capital when needed or onattractive terms, we would be forced to delay, reduce or eliminate our research and development programs or future commercialization efforts.

We anticipate that our expenses will increase substantially as we:

 

  

complete clinical development of GC4419 for the reduction of SOM in patients with locally advanced HNC, includingour ongoing Phase 3 clinical trial;

 

  

prepare and file for regulatory approval of GC4419 for the reduction of SOM in patients with HNC;

 

  

initiate and advance our planned Phase 2a clinical trial of GC4419 for the reduction in the incidence ofradiotherapy-induced esophagitis;

 

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initiate and advance our planned Phase 1b/2a clinical trial for GC4711 to increase the anti-cancer efficacy ofSBRT in patients with NSCLC;

 

  

seek to discover and develop additional clinical and pre-clinical product candidates;

 

  

scale up our clinical and regulatory capabilities;

 

  

adapt our regulatory compliance efforts to incorporate requirements applicable to marketed products;

 

  

establish a sales, marketing and distribution infrastructure and scale up external manufacturing capabilities tocommercialize any product candidates for which we may obtain regulatory approval;

 

  

maintain, expand and protect our intellectual property portfolio;

 

  

hire additional internal or external clinical, manufacturing and scientific personnel or consultants;

 

  

add operational, financial and management information systems and personnel, including personnel to support ourproduct development efforts; and

 

  

incur additional legal, accounting and other expenses in operating as a public company.

We expect our existing cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments, together with the net proceeds from this offering, will enable us tofund our operating expenses and capital expenditure requirements into                 . See “Use of Proceeds.”

Because of the numerous risks and uncertainties associated with research, development and commercialization of product candidates, we areunable to estimate the exact amount of our working capital requirements. Our future funding requirements will depend on and could increase significantly as a result of many factors, including:

 

  

the scope, progress, results and costs of pre-clinical studies and clinical trials;

 

  

the scope, prioritization and number of our research and development programs;

 

  

the costs, timing and outcome of regulatory review of our product candidates;

 

  

our ability to establish and maintain collaborations on favorable terms, if at all;

 

  

the extent to which we are obligated to reimburse, or entitled to reimbursement of, clinical trial costs undercollaboration agreements, if any;

 

  

the costs of preparing, filing and prosecuting patent applications, maintaining and enforcing our intellectualproperty rights and defending intellectual property-related claims;

 

  

the extent to which we acquire or in-license other product candidates andtechnologies;

 

  

the costs of securing manufacturing arrangements for commercial production; and

 

  

the costs of establishing or contracting for sales and marketing capabilities if we obtain regulatory approvalsto market our product candidates.

 

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Identifying potential product candidates and conducting pre-clinical studies and clinicaltrials is a time-consuming, expensive and uncertain process that takes many years to complete, and we may never generate the necessary data or results required to obtain marketing approval and achieve product sales. In addition, our productcandidates, if approved, may not achieve commercial success. Our commercial revenues, if any, will be derived from sales of product candidates that we do not expect to be commercially available for the next couple of years, if at all. Accordingly,we will need to continue to rely on additional financing to achieve our business objectives. Adequate additional financing may not be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all.

Until such time, if ever, as we can generate substantial product revenues, we expect to finance our cash needs through a combination of equityofferings, debt financings, collaborations, strategic alliances and licensing arrangements. To the extent that we raise additional capital through the sale of equity or convertible debt securities, your ownership interest will be diluted, and theterms of these securities may include liquidation or other preferences that adversely affect your rights as a common stockholder. Debt financing, if available, may involve agreements that include covenants limiting or restricting our ability to takespecific actions, such as incurring additional debt, making capital expenditures or declaring dividends.

If we raise funds throughadditional collaborations, strategic alliances or licensing arrangements with third parties, we may have to relinquish valuable rights to our technologies, future revenue streams, research programs or product candidates or to grant licenses on termsthat may not be favorable to us. If we are unable to raise additional funds when needed, we may be required to delay, limit, reduce or terminate our product development or future commercialization efforts or grant rights to develop and marketproduct candidates that we would otherwise prefer to develop and market ourselves.

Royalty Agreement with Clarus

In November 2018, we entered into an Amended and Restated Purchase and Sale Agreement, or the Royalty Agreement, by and among us, Clarus IVGalera Royalty AIV, L.P., Clarus IV-A, L.P., Clarus IV-B, L.P., Clarus IV-C, L.P. and ClarusIV-D, L.P., or, collectively, Clarus. Pursuant to the Royalty Agreement, Clarus agreed to pay us, in the aggregate, up to $80 million, or the Royalty Purchase Price, in four tranches of $20 millioneach upon the achievement of specified clinical milestones in our ROMAN Trial. We agreed to apply the proceeds from such payments primarily to support clinical development and regulatory activities for GC4419, GC4711 and any pharmaceutical productcomprising or containing GC4419 or GC4711, or, collectively, the Products, as well as to satisfy working capital obligations and for general corporate expenses. We achieved the first milestone under the Royalty Agreement and received the firsttranche of the Royalty Purchase Price in November 2018 and received the second tranche of the Royalty Purchase Price in April 2019 in connection with the achievement of the second milestone under the Royalty Agreement.

In connection with the payment of each tranche of the Royalty Purchase Price, we have agreed to sell, convey, transfer and assign to Clarusall of our right, title and interest in a mid-single digit percentage of (i) the gross amount from the worldwide net sale of the Products and (ii) all amounts received by us or our affiliates,licensees and sublicensees (collectively, the Product Payments) during the Royalty Period. The Royalty Period means, on a Product-by-Product and country-by-countrybasis, the period of time commencing on the commercial launch of such Product in such country and ending on the latest to occur of (i) the 12th anniversary of such commercial launch, (ii) the expiration of all valid claims of our patentscovering such Product in such country, and (iii) the expiration of regulatory data protection or market exclusivity or similar regulatory protection afforded by the health authorities in such country, to the extent such protection orexclusivity effectively prevents generic versions of such Product from entering the market in such country.

The Royalty Agreement willremain in effect until the date on which the aggregate amount of the Product Payments paid to Clarus exceeds a fixed single-digit multiple of the actual amount of the Royalty Purchase Price received by us, unless earlier terminated pursuant to themutual written agreement of us and Clarus.

 

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Contractual Obligations and Commitments

The following table summarizes our contractual obligations and commitments at December 31, 2018:

 

   

Less
than
1 Year

   

1 to 3
Years

   

3 to 5
Years

   

More than
5 Years

   

Total

 
   (in thousands) 

Operating leases(1)

  $440   $1,243   $65   $—     $1,748 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

  $440   $1,243   $65   $—     $1,748 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(1)

Reflects obligations pursuant to our office leases in Malvern, Pennsylvania and St. Louis, Missouri.

The commitment amounts in the table above are associated with contracts that are enforceable and legally binding andthat specify all significant terms, including fixed or minimum services to be used, fixed, minimum or variable price provisions, and the approximate timing of the actions under the contracts. Our contracts with CMOs, CROs and other third parties forthe manufacture of our product candidates and to support clinical trials and pre-clinical research studies and testing are generally cancelable by us upon prior notice. Payments due upon cancellationconsisting only of payments for services provided or expenses incurred, including noncancelable obligations of our service providers, up to the date of cancellation are not included in the preceding table as the amount and timing of such paymentsare not known.

The contractual obligations table does not include any potential royalty payments that we may be required to make underour Royalty Agreement with Clarus. We excluded these royalty payments given that the timing of any such payments cannot be reasonably estimated at this time.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We do not have any relationships with unconsolidated entities or financial partnerships, including entities sometimes referred to asstructured finance or special purpose entities that were established for the purpose of facilitating off-balance sheet arrangements or other contractually narrow or limited purposes. We do not engage in off-balance sheet financing arrangements. In addition, we do not engage in trading activities involving non-exchange traded contracts. We therefore believe that we are notmaterially exposed to any financing, liquidity, market or credit risk that could arise if we had engaged in these relationships.

Critical AccountingPolicies

Our management’s discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based on ourconsolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. The preparation of these consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect thereported amounts of assets, liabilities, and expenses and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities in our financial statements. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates and judgments, including those related to accrued expenses andstock-based compensation. We base our estimates on historical experience, known trends and events, and various other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments aboutthe carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

While our significant accounting policies are described in more detail in Note 2 to our audited consolidated financial statements includedelsewhere in this prospectus, we believe the following accounting policies are the most critical to the judgments and estimates used in the preparation of our financial statements.

 

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In-Process Research and Development and Goodwill

Intangible assets acquired in a business combination are recognized separately from goodwill and are initially recognized attheir fair value at the acquisition date. Intangible assets related to in-process research and development, or IPR&D, are treated as indefinite lived intangible assets and not amortized until they areplaced into service, typically upon regulatory approval. At that time, we will determine the useful life of the intangible asset and begin amortization. IPR&D assets are reviewed for impairment annually or more frequently if indicators ofpotential impairment exist. There were no impairments of IPR&D assets for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2018 and for the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2019.

Goodwill represents the excess of the purchase price over the estimated fair value of the identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumedin a business combination. We evaluate goodwill for impairment annually or more frequently upon the occurrence of triggering events or substantive changes in circumstances that could indicate a potential impairment. An impairment loss is recognizedwhen the fair value of the reporting unit to which the goodwill relates is below its carrying value for the difference between the fair value and its carrying amounts. There was no impairment of goodwill for the years ended December 31, 2017and 2018 and for the six months ended June 30, 2018 and 2019.

Royalty Purchase Liability

Pursuant to our Royalty Agreement with Clarus, we received a cash payment of $20.0 million in each of November 2018 and April 2019 and areeligible to receive up to an additional $40.0 million from Clarus based upon the achievement of specific clinical milestones in our ROMAN Trial. We have accounted for the Royalty Agreement under Accounting Standards Codification Topic 470,Debt. The proceeds received are recorded as long-term debt obligations. Interest expense on such obligation is imputed by estimating risk adjusted future royalty payments over the term of the Royalty Agreement which takes into considerationthe probability of obtaining FDA approval. Other significant assumptions include adjustments to estimated gross revenues to arrive at net product sales to which a royalty payment can be estimated. The non-cash interest expense recorded increases thebalance of our royalty obligation. The royalty obligation will be reduced when royalty payments are made, if any.

However, actual royaltypayments are highly uncertain and may change depending on a number of factors, including our ability to obtain FDA approval, successfully commercialize our product candidates and the timing of future royalty payments. We impute interest expense onour royalty purchase obligations based on such factors at each reporting period. As these factors change, we will adjust our estimate of the imputed interest expense accordingly. Given the amount and timing of proceeds received to date, changes inthe assumptions used to impute interest expense could have a material impact to our consolidated financial statements for the six months ended June 30, 2019.

Research and Development Expenses

Research and development expenses consist primarily of costs incurred in connection with the development of our product candidates. We expenseresearch and development costs as incurred.

We accrue an expense for pre-clinical studies and clinical trial activities performed bythird parties based upon estimates of the proportion of work completed over the term of the individual trial and patient enrollment rates in accordance with agreements with CROs and clinical trial sites. We determine the estimates by reviewingcontracts, vendor agreements and purchase orders, and through discussions with our internal clinical personnel and external service providers as to the progress or stage of completion of trials or services and the agreed-upon fee to be paid for suchservices. However, actual costs and timing of clinical trials are highly uncertain, subject to risks and may change depending upon a number of factors, including our clinical development plan.

 

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We make estimates of our accrued expenses as of each balance sheet date in our consolidatedfinancial statements based on facts and circumstances known at that time. If the actual timing of the performance of services or the level of effort varies from the estimate, we will adjust the accrual accordingly. Nonrefundable advance payments forgoods and services, including fees for process development or manufacturing and distribution of clinical supplies that will be used in future research and development activities, are deferred and recognized as expense in the period that the relatedgoods are consumed or services are performed.

Share-Based Compensation

We measure compensation expense for all share-based awards based on the estimated fair value of the share-based awards on the grant date. Weuse the Black-Scholes option pricing model to value our stock option awards. We recognize compensation expense on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period, which is generally the vesting period of the award. We have not issued awardswhere vesting is subject to a market or performance condition.

The Black-Scholes option-pricing model requires the use of subjectiveassumptions that include the expected stock price volatility and the fair value of the underlying common stock on the date of grant. See Note 10 to our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus for informationconcerning certain of the specific assumptions we used in applying the Black-Scholes option pricing model to determine the estimated fair value of our stock options granted during the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2018 and for the sixmonths ended June 30, 2018 and 2019.

The following table summarizes by grant date the number of shares of common stock subject tostock options granted from January 1, 2017, as well as the associated per share exercise price and the estimated fair value per share of our common stock as of the grant date:

 

Grant date

  

Number of options
granted

   

Exercise price per
share

   

Estimated fair
value pershare
of common stock

 

January 18, 2017

   2,447,631   $0.53   $0.53 

March 30, 2017

   191,909    0.53    0.53 

February 28, 2018

   268,820    0.87    0.86 

June 21, 2018

   80,000    0.86    0.86 

January 10, 2019

   4,885,000    1.40    1.40 

March 13, 2019

   100,000    1.83    1.83 

March 29, 2019

   431,767    1.83    1.83 

July 30, 2019

   380,000    1.90    1.90 

Based on an assumed initial public offering price of$                    per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, the intrinsic value ofvested and unvested stock options outstanding as of June 30, 2019 was $                    million and$                    million, respectively.

Estimating the Fair Value of Common Stock

We are required to estimate the fair value of the common stock underlying our share-based awards when performing the fair value calculationsusing the Black-Scholes option pricing model. Because our common stock is not currently publicly traded, the fair value of the common stock underlying our stock options has been determined on each grant date by our board of directors, with inputfrom management, considering our most recently available third-party valuation of common shares. All options to purchase shares of our common stock are intended to be granted with an exercise price per share no less than the estimated fair value pershare of our common stock underlying those options on the date of grant, based on the information known to us on the date of grant.

 

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The third-party valuation of our common stock was performed using methodologies, approachesand assumptions consistent with the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, or AICPA, Audit and Accounting Practice Aid Series: Valuation of Privately Held Company Equity Securities Issued as Compensation, or the AICPAPractice Guide. In addition, our board of directors considered various objective and subjective factors to estimate the estimated fair value of our common stock, including:

 

  

the estimated value of each security both outstanding and anticipated;

 

  

the anticipated capital structure that will directly impact the value of the currently outstanding securities;

 

  

our results of operations and financial position;

 

  

the status of our research and development efforts;

 

  

the composition of, and changes to, our management team and board of directors;

 

  

the lack of liquidity of our common stock as a private company;

 

  

our stage of development and business strategy and the material risks related to our business and industry;

 

  

external market conditions affecting the life sciences and biotechnology industry sectors;

 

  

U.S. and global economic conditions;

 

  

the likelihood of achieving a liquidity event for the holders of our common stock, such as an initial publicoffering, or IPO, or a sale of our company, given prevailing market conditions; and

 

  

the market value and volatility of comparable companies.

In determining the estimated fair value of common stock, our board of directors considered the subjective factors discussed above inconjunction with the most recent valuations of our common stock that were prepared by an independent third-party. The independent valuation prepared as of December 31, 2016 was utilized by our board of directors when determining the estimatedfair value of common stock for the awards granted on January 18, 2017 and March 30, 2017. An independent valuation was also prepared as of December 31, 2017 and utilized for the awards granted on February 28, 2018 and June 21, 2018. Theestimated fair value of common stock for the awards granted on January 10, 2019 was determined utilizing the independent valuation prepared as of September 1, 2018. The estimated fair values of common stock for the awards granted in March 2019and July 2019 were determined utilizing independent valuations prepared as of March 31, 2019 and July 15, 2019, respectively. These third-party valuations resulted in a valuation of our common stock of $0.53, $0.86, $1.40, $1.83 and $1.90 per shareas of December 31, 2016, December 31, 2017, September 1, 2018, March 31, 2019 and July 15, 2019, respectively.

Following the closing ofthis offering, the fair value of our common stock will be the closing price of our common stock on the Nasdaq Global Market as reported on the date of the grant.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

SeeNote 2 to our audited consolidated financial statements and Note 2 to our unaudited interim consolidated financial statements found elsewhere in this prospectus for a description of recent accounting pronouncements applicable to ourconsolidated financial statements.

 

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Qualitative and Quantitative Disclosures About Market Risk

We are exposed to market risk related to changes in interest rates. As of June 30, 2019, we had cash, cash equivalents and short-terminvestments of $81.3 million consisting of bank deposits, U.S. Treasury securities, and a money market fund invested in U.S. Treasury securities. Our primary exposure to market risk is interest rate sensitivity, which is affected by changes inthe general level of U.S. interest rates, particularly because our investments are in marketable debt securities. Our available-for-sale securities are subject tointerest rate risk and will fall in value if market interest rates increase. Due to the short-term duration of our investment portfolio and the low risk profile of our investments, an immediate 10% change in interest rates would not have a materialeffect on the fair market value of our portfolio. We have the ability to hold our available-sale-securities until maturity, and therefore, we would not expect our operating results or cash flows to be affected to any significant degree by the effectof a change in market interest rates on our investments. We do not currently have any auction rate securities.

JOBS Act Transition Period

In April 2012, the JOBS Act was enacted. Section 107 of the JOBS Act provides that an “emerging growth company” can takeadvantage of the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, for complying with new or revised accounting standards. Thus, an emerging growth company can delay the adoption of certainaccounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. However, we are choosing to opt out of such extended transition period and, as a result, we will comply with new or revised accounting standards on the relevantdates on which adoption of such standards is required for non-emerging growth companies. Our decision to opt out of the extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards is irrevocable. However, we may take advantageof the other exemptions discussed below.

We are in the process of evaluating the benefits of relying on other exemptions and reducedreporting requirements under the JOBS Act. Subject to certain conditions, as an emerging growth company, we may rely on certain of these exemptions, including without limitation, (1) providing an auditor’s attestation report on our systemof internal controls over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and (2) complying with any requirement that may be adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board regarding mandatory audit firmrotation or a supplement to the auditor’s report providing additional information about the audit and the financial statements, known as the auditor discussion and analysis. We will remain an emerging growth company until the earlier to occurof (a) the last day of the fiscal year (i) following the fifth anniversary of the completion of this offering, (ii) in which we have total annual gross revenues of at least $1.07 billion or (iii) in which we are deemed to bea “large accelerated filer” under the rules of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, which means the market value of our common stock that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 millionas of the prior June 30th, and (b) the date on which we have issued more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt during the prior three-year period.

 

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BUSINESS

Overview

We are a clinical stagebiopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing a pipeline of novel, proprietary therapeutics that have the potential to transform radiotherapy in cancer. We leverage our expertise in superoxide dismutase mimetics to design drugsto reduce normal tissue toxicity from radiotherapy and to increase the anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy. Our lead product candidate, GC4419, is a potent and highly selective small molecule dismutase mimetic we are initially developing for thereduction of severe oral mucositis, or SOM. SOM is a common, debilitating complication of radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer, or HNC. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, has granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation toGC4419 for the reduction of the duration, incidence and severity of SOM induced by radiotherapy. In October 2018, we began evaluating GC4419 in a Phase 3 registrational trial and we expect to report top-linedata from this trial in the first half of 2021. We believe GC4419, which to date is not approved for any indication, has the potential to be the first FDA-approved drug and the standard of care for thereduction of SOM in patients with HNC receiving radiotherapy, and we plan to further evaluate its use in other radiotherapy-induced toxicities, including esophagitis.

GC4419, also known as avasopasem manganese, has successfully completed two clinical trials to reduce SOM in patients with HNC undergoingintensity-modulated radiation therapy, or IMRT, and also receiving cisplatin, a chemotherapy drug. SOM is commonly defined as Grade 3 or Grade 4 oral mucositis on the World Health Organization scale. We demonstrated proof-of-concept with GC4419 for this indication in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled 223-patient Phase 2b trial. In the trial, GC4419 met the primaryendpoint by demonstrating a 92% reduction in median duration of SOM in the 90 mg treatment arm as compared to placebo, which was statistically significant and consistent with the results of our Phase 1b/2a SOM trial. Key secondary endpointsevaluating the incidence and severity of SOM also demonstrated substantial dose-dependent reductions of 34% and 47%, respectively, in the 90 mg treatment arm, and GC4419 was well tolerated in this trial. In addition, as in our other clinicaltrials and pre-clinical studies to date, in this trial, the anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy was maintained through one year when combined with GC4419. Following consultation with the FDA, we initiated asingle confirmatory, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase 3 registrational trial of a 90 mg dose of GC4419 in patients with locally advanced HNC receiving radiotherapy, which we refer to as the ROMAN Trial. The primary endpoint of the ROMANTrial is the reduction in the incidence of SOM through the completion of radiotherapy.

Superoxide, a highly reactive molecule, isproduced by every cell as a part of normal metabolism, and at higher levels in certain diseases. Left uncontrolled it is highly toxic, leading to cell damage or cell death. To prevent this, the body produces superoxide dismutase enzymes, or SODs,which convert superoxide to hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide is much less toxic than superoxide to normal tissue. Radiotherapy induces a large burst of superoxide in the irradiated tissues, which can overwhelm these SODs, damaging normal cells.Such damage to the oral mucosa, located in the mouth, is referred to as oral mucositis, or OM, and is particularly common among patients with HNC receiving radiotherapy.

Radiotherapy-induced SOM can lead to devastating complications. A majority of patients will suffer severe pain which is often managed with theuse of opioids. Patients with SOM are at risk of dehydration and malnutrition as a result of the inability to eat or drink, and often require nutrition through a feeding tube or intravenous line. SOM can also be dose-limiting, requiring a reductionor delay in subsequent radiotherapy, leading to poorer clinical outcomes. Approximately 11% of patients receiving radiotherapy for HNC experience unplanned breaks of a week or more in radiotherapy due to SOM, with each week of treatment delaydecreasing tumor control by over 10%. Additionally, it is estimated that patients with HNC who developed OM when treated with radiotherapy incurred, on average, approximately $32,000 in additional medical expenses in the first six months from thestart of radiotherapy compared to patients with HNC treated with radiotherapy who did not develop OM.

 

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Each year in the United States, approximately 65,000 patients are diagnosed with HNC,according to the American Cancer Society. In the five largest European markets, approximately 68,000 patients are diagnosed annually with HNC, and an additional 23,000 in Japan. We estimate that approximately 65% of patients diagnosed with HNCwill be treated with radiotherapy. All patients with HNC treated with radiotherapy are at risk for developing SOM. Our market research suggests the potential for significant, rapid uptake of GC4419 for SOM, if approved. In a survey we conducted of150 U.S. radiation oncologists, respondents stated that they would recommend GC4419 to 69% of their patients with HNC receiving radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy or targeted therapy. Furthermore, 96% of these physicians stated that theywould try GC4419 within the first twelve months of it becoming available and 77% of physicians stated that they would adopt GC4419 within the first 12 months of it becoming available. We believe, if approved, GC4419 would be prescribed by physiciansas standard-of-care treatment for patients with HNC receiving radiotherapy.

Based on observations from multiple studies, we estimate thatapproximately 70% of patients with HNC receiving radiotherapy will develop SOM and between 20% to 30% will develop Grade 4 OM. Despite this clear unmet need, no drug has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of SOM in patients with HNC. Currentmeasures attempting to moderate SOM include basic oral care; anti-inflammatory agents; antimicrobials, coating agents, anesthetics and analgesics; laser and other light therapy, cryotherapy; and natural and other miscellaneous agents. The treatmentguidelines developed by the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer and International Society of Oral Oncology, or MASCC / ISOO, demonstrate that there is a high unmet need for the treatment or prevention of OM in patients with HNC,and a lack of clear efficacy with existing treatment options.

We plan to expand the evaluation of GC4419 into the reduction ofradiotherapy-induced esophagitis, or mucositis of the esophagus, which often develops in patients receiving radiotherapy for lung, esophageal, breast or head and neck cancers or for lymphoma. Esophagitis is a frequent and radiotherapy-limiting sideeffect in these patients. Symptoms can be life-threatening and include an inability to swallow, severe pain, ulceration, infection, bleeding and weight loss and may require hospitalization. There are also no drugs approved by the FDA for theprevention or treatment of radiotherapy-induced esophagitis, with treatment options focused on minimizing the symptoms of the problem. These do not address the underlying cause of esophagitis. We intend toinitiate a Phase 2a trial in the first half of 2020 for the reduction of the incidence of esophagitis in patients with lung cancer receiving IMRT.

Unlike existing treatment options that are largely palliative in nature, we believe GC4419 has the potential to address and mitigate the rootcause of radiotherapy-induced mucositis, including OM and esophagitis. By removing superoxide, GC4419 is designed to reduce the damage radiotherapy causes to the patient’s normal tissue, and thereby reduce the incidence and severity ofmucositis.

In addition to developing GC4419 for the reduction of normal tissue toxicity from radiotherapy, we are developing ourdismutase mimetics to increase the anti-cancer efficacy of higher daily doses of radiotherapy, including stereotactic body radiation therapy, or SBRT. Cancer cells have been observed to be more susceptible than normal cells to increased levels ofhydrogen peroxide. In our pre-clinical studies, we have observed increased anti-cancer efficacy of higher daily doses of radiotherapy in combination with our dismutase mimetics. In a pre-clinical study, we demonstrated that this increase inanti-cancer efficacy was due to the conversion of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide by our dismutase mimetics. This increased efficacy could be particularly important in settings where the anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy alone is insufficient toachieve the desired outcome. Clinically, SBRT is increasingly used in patients with certain tumors, such as those seen in locally advanced pancreatic cancer, or LAPC, and non-small cell lung cancer, or NSCLC,that are less responsive to the small daily doses typical of IMRT. SBRT typically involves a patient receiving three to five large doses of radiotherapy, in contrast to the 30 to 35 small daily doses typical of IMRT. Even with the use of SBRT, theopportunity for improvement in treatment outcomes is substantial.

To explore this opportunity, we are currently conducting a pilot,randomized, placebo-controlled Phase 1b/2a trial of GC4419 in combination with SBRT in patients with LAPC whose tumor cannot be resected.

 

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The primary objective of this trial is to determine the maximum tolerated daily dose of SBRT in conjunction with our dismutase mimetic, with secondary measures assessing, among others,progression-free survival and overall response rate compared to placebo. We believe this combination therapy may lead to improved patient survival rates, which we will also track in our clinical development. We expect to report top-line data from this trial in the second half of 2020.

We plan to leverage ourobservations from our GC4419 SBRT pilot Phase 1b/2a trial in LAPC to help develop GC4711 to increase the anti-cancer efficacy of SBRT. We have successfully completed a Phase 1 trial of intravenous GC4711 in healthy volunteers and plan to commence aPhase 1b/2a trial with GC4711 in combination with SBRT in patients with NSCLC in the second half of 2020. In addition to this GC4711 Phase 1b/2a trial in NSCLC, we plan to conduct future trials with GC4711 in combination with SBRT, including in LAPCif we are successful in our ongoing SBRT GC4419 pilot Phase 1b/2a trial in that indication. We are also currently evaluating several oral formulations of GC4711 in a Phase 1 trial in healthy volunteers, based onpre-clinical studies suggesting that GC4711 can be delivered orally.

We retain worldwide rightsto our product candidate portfolio. Our product candidate portfolio is protected by issued patents with claims directed to composition of matter and method of use, which, when including patent term extensions, are projected to expire between 2027and 2038 in the United States.

We intend to commercialize GC4419 and our other current product candidates, if approved, by building aspecialized sales and marketing organization of approximately 40 sales representatives focusing on radiation oncologists in the United States. We believe that this targeted sales organization would allow us to reach the concentrated prescribing baseof approximately 4,000 U.S. radiation oncologists, who we believe are among the physicians most likely to use GC4419 and our other product candidates. Outside the United States, we may seek to establish collaborations to maximize the commercialopportunities for GC4419 and our other product candidates.

Our management team has extensive drug development and commercializationexperience ranging from discovery through market registrational and commercial launches. Further, we are supported by a leading group of biotech investors including Adage Capital, Blackstone Life Sciences (formerly Clarus), HBM Healthcare, Nan FungLife Sciences, New Enterprise Associates, Novartis Venture Fund, Novo Holdings, RA Capital, Rock Springs Capital, Sofinnova Investments and Tekla Capital.

 

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Our Pipeline

The following table summarizes our product candidates:

 

LOGO

 

(1)

We also plan to conduct a Phase 2a multi-center trial in Europe assessing the safety of 90 mg GC4419 in up to 70patients with HNC undergoing standard-of-care radiotherapy. We plan to initiate this trial in the first half of 2020.

 

(2)

Phase 2a trial in patients with lung cancer building on GC4419 safety and tolerability findings in patients withHNC SOM studies.

 

(3)

Observations from our Phase 1b/2a pilot trial of GC4419 in combination with SBRT in patients with LAPC whosetumor cannot be resected will be used to help develop GC4711 to increase the anti-cancer efficacy of SBRT.

Our Strategy

Our mission is to transform cancer therapy by reducing normal tissue toxicity induced by radiotherapy and to improve the lives of patientswith cancer. We are also seeking to increase the anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy with the use of our dismutase mimetics. Key elements of our strategy are as follows:

 

  

Complete the development and obtain FDA approval for GC4419 for the reduction of radiotherapy-inducedtoxicities. GC4419 has received Breakthrough Therapy Designation from the FDA for the reduction of the duration, incidence and severity of SOM induced by radiotherapy, with or without systemic therapy. We are currently evaluating GC4419 in aPhase 3 registrational trial to reduce the incidence of SOM in patients receiving radiotherapy for locally advanced HNC. We expect to report top-line data from this trial in the first half of 2021. Wealso plan to initiate a Phase 2a trial in the first half of 2020 to assess GC4419 in combination with radiotherapy to reduce the incidence of esophagitis in patients with lung cancer. Based upon the outcomes of our ongoing and planned trials,we plan to initiate additional clinical trials for GC4419 to reduce radiotherapy-induced toxicities in other cancer indications. We may also pursue a strategy for GC4419, if approved for reduction in the incidence of SOM, by presenting clinical datato entities like the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, or NCCN, to support the use of GC4419 to reduce esophagitis and/or other radiotherapy-induced toxicities as medically accepted indications in published drug compendia, notwithstanding thatthese indications may not be approved by the FDA.

 

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Build a commercial infrastructure in the United States. We intend to commercialize GC4419, if approved, bybuilding a specialized sales and marketing organization in the United States focused on radiation oncologists. We believe a scientifically-oriented, customer-focused team of approximately 40 sales representatives would allow us to effectively reachthe approximately 4,000 radiation oncologists in the United States. We also expect to leverage this sales organization to commercialize GC4711, if approved, and any of our future product candidates in the United States. Outside the United States, wemay seek to establish collaborations for the commercialization of GC4419 and our other product candidates.

 

  

Advance the development of GC4711 in combination with SBRT to increase the anti-cancer efficacy ofradiotherapy. Based on extensive pre-clinical research results, we believe that GC4711 has the potential to increase the anti-cancer efficacy and safety profile of SBRT. We successfully completed a Phase 1trial with GC4711 in healthy volunteers, and plan to initiate a Phase 1b/2a trial with GC4711 in combination with SBRT in patients with NSCLC in the second half of 2020. In addition, upon the successful completion of our ongoing pilot Phase 1b/2atrial of GC4419 in combination with SBRT in patients with LAPC, and based upon FDA feedback, we expect to pursue further development in patients with LAPC with GC4711 in combination with SBRT. We expect to report top-line data from our pilot Phase1b/2a trial of GC4419 in the second half of 2020.

 

  

Develop additional novel dismutase mimetics and formulations. We intend to leverage our expertise insuperoxide dismutase mimetics to continue to develop novel compounds that are intended to reduce normal tissue toxicity from radiotherapy and increase the anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy. Additionally, we believe we can broaden the utility ofGC4711 or these novel compounds by formulating them for oral delivery. We are currently evaluating multiple oral formulations of GC4711 in a Phase 1 trial in healthy volunteers. In addition, we intend to seek new applications for our dismutasemimetics, including potential combinations in cancer therapy.

 

  

Seek strategic collaborative relationships. We intend to seek strategic collaborations to facilitate thecapital-efficient development of our dismutase mimetics. We believe these collaborations could potentially provide significant funding to advance our dismutase mimetics candidate pipeline while allowing us to benefit from the development expertiseof our collaborators.

 

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Background on Superoxide and Superoxide Dismutase

Superoxide is similar to the molecular oxygen, O2, that is essential to breathing andlife, except it carries one more electron. This extra electron, shown in the chemical formula O2•-, makes superoxide a reactive oxygen species that can react with a variety of biologicalmolecules. Superoxide is produced constantly in every living cell by normal activities such as mitochondrial respiration, and if not removed rapidly, it causes damage to lipids, proteins, DNA and other critical biological molecules. As a result, itcan harm or kill cells and has been implicated in a variety of biological disorders, including cancer. As protection, human cells produce SODs to eliminate superoxide by rapidly and selectively converting it to hydrogen peroxide at rates of 107 molecules per second or higher. Hydrogen peroxide is much less toxic than superoxide to normal cells, and is subsequently broken down by various enzymes, such as catalase (the natural disposal enzymefor hydrogen peroxide), to molecular oxygen and water. The SOD pathway is depicted below.

 

LOGO

Radiotherapy induces bursts of superoxide well in excess of normal amounts in the irradiated tissues, whichcan overwhelm native SOD activity. It generates superoxide directly, by splitting water molecules immediately, and indirectly, by activating enzymes that produce large amounts of superoxide following radiation. In addition, once tissue damage hasbegun, inflammatory cells attracted to the irradiated region also produce superoxide prodigiously. The resulting high levels of superoxide can induce significant damage in normal cells, and, depending on which organs fall within the irradiatedfield, can drive a variety of normal tissue toxicities. A condition referred to as mucositis occurs when the cells lining the gastro-intestinal tract, known as the mucosa, are damaged or killed.

Scientific literature suggests that metabolic differences make cancer cells much less sensitive than normal cells to elevated superoxide;elevated superoxide levels may even be typical of some cancers. As a result, the removal of the excess superoxide generated by radiotherapy does not decrease the anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy. Meanwhile, scientific literature also suggeststhat cancer cells are much more sensitive than normal cells to elevated hydrogen peroxide, so the conversion of excess superoxide to hydrogen peroxide by SODs may contribute to the anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy.

Artificially increasing SOD levels, by gene overexpression or administering recombinant SOD enzyme, has been shown in third-party pre-clinical and clinical studies to reduce radiotherapy-induced normal tissue toxicities, including mucositis. The pre-clinical studies have also suggested that increasingSOD levels can increase the anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy. Current therapeutic applications of the SODs themselves, however, have been limited by their following characteristics:

 

  

large size and inability to enter cells and mitochondria, where superoxide is predominantly produced;

 

  

immunogenicity, particularly when derived from non-human sources;

 

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short half-lives in circulation; and

 

  

inactivation or inhibition by various reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide.

Our Superoxide Dismutase Mimetics

We believe low molecular weight drugs that can mimic native SODs can overcome the limitations of using the native enzymes therapeutically. Thechallenge has been finding small molecule dismutase mimetics with similarly fast catalytic rates and high selectivity for superoxide that are also stable, safe and suitable for manufacturing. We are developing our dismutase mimetics to address thischallenge.

Our class of dismutase mimetics are based on a common core structure, where a macrocyclic ring positions five nitrogen atomsto tightly hold a manganese atom in the ring’s center. These pentaaza macrocycles are manufactured with the manganese in the +2 oxidation state, or Mn+2. In solution, this Mn+2 reacts rapidly with the protonated form of superoxide, which has the chemical formula HO2• and is constantly in equilibrium with regular superoxide. In this reaction, Mn+2 gives up an electron and is oxidized to Mn+3, making hydrogen peroxide. Then, as quickly as superoxide can reach the Mn+3, it takes superoxide’s extra electron, reducing back to Mn+2, making molecular oxygen and bringing the dismutase mimetic full circle back towhere it started.

Our Dismutase Mimetics Core Structure:

Pentaaza Macrocycles

 

LOGO

We have designed, and are developing, our dismutase mimetics to have each of the following essentialfeatures:

 

  

Speed. Our dismutase mimetics catalyze the conversion of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide and molecularoxygen at a rapid rate of 2 × 107 molecules per second or more, comparable to native SODs. Their structures hold the manganese such that it can rapidly shift back and forth between Mn+2 and Mn+3, meaning that their catalytic rate, or the speed that they convert superoxide, is mostly dependent on how fast superoxide can get to themanganese.

 

  

Selectivity. Our dismutase mimetics are designed to interact only with superoxide. Central to thisselectivity are three key attributes: (1) the Mn+2 will not react with reducing agents; (2) oxidizing Mn+2 requires a powerfuloxidizing agent, so it will not react with nitric oxide and molecular oxygen; and (3) the Mn+2 oxidizes rapidly via a single-electron pathway, excluding many other biologically relevantreactive oxygen species, including peroxynitrite, hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide, that operate as two-electron oxidizing agents.

 

  

Stability. Our dismutase mimetics hold on tightly to the manganese at the center of the macrocyclic ring,allowing them to maintain their functionality as dismutase mimetics while they remain in the body.

 

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Safety. We have observed our dismutase mimetics to be well-tolerated in ourpre-clinical studies and clinical trials in patients.

 

  

Synthesis. We have developed an efficient and cost-effective manufacturing process.

In radiotherapy, we believe our dismutase mimetics have the potential to reduce normal tissue toxicity by removing excessive superoxide. Wehave demonstrated this in pre-clinical models not only of mucositis, but also radiotherapy damage to the lungs, liver and other organs. Importantly, our dismutase mimetics do not interfere with the anti-cancerefficacy of radiotherapy, as demonstrated in pre-clinical tumor models and in our placebo-controlled Phase 2b trial.

There is also the potential to increase the anti-cancer efficacy of SBRT, where our dismutase mimetics generate high daily doses of hydrogenperoxide. Pre-clinically we have shown this effect in a variety of cancer types, including head and neck, pancreatic, lung and breast cancer and, when SBRT is combined with immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy.Given the combination of reduced normal tissue toxicity and increased anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy, we believe that our dismutase mimetics can transform radiotherapy.

We currently have two dismutase mimetic candidates in clinical development, GC4419 and GC4711. Leveraging our expertise, we plan to continueto develop novel compounds and believe we can broaden the utility of our technology by formulating one or more candidates for oral delivery.

Radiotherapy-Induced Toxicities in Patients with Cancer

Over 50% of patients with cancer will be treated with radiotherapy at some time in their treatment cycle. While radiotherapy has variablesuccess depending on the cancer being treated, the toxicity or side effects associated with its use can limit its effectiveness. Radiotherapy causes acute and late toxicities that affect various organs and functions.

One of the most common radiotherapy-induced toxicities results in a condition referred to as mucositis which occurs when cells lining thegastro-intestinal tract, known as the mucosa, are damaged or killed. The oral mucosa is a common location for mucositis to occur, particularly for patients with HNC receiving radiotherapy. Another common location for mucositis to occur in patientsreceiving radiotherapy is the esophagus, referred to as esophagitis.

Oral Mucositis

OM occurs when radiotherapy induces the production of superoxide that attacks and breaks down the epithelial cells lining the mouth. Theseverity of OM is commonly measured using the WHO scale, which is also used by the FDA as a basis for product approvals. The scale consists of five Grades: Grade 0 through Grade 4. SOM is commonly defined as Grade 3 or Grade 4 OM.

 

Grade WHO Scale Description

 

 

 

0 No OM
1 Erythema (redness) and soreness
2 Erythema and ulcers but patients can swallow solid food
3 Ulcers with extensive erythema and patients cannot swallow solid food
4 Oral alimentation (solid or liquid) is not possible

 

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SOM can lead to devastating complications, including:

 

  

Pain. A majority of patients experience severe pain, often requiring opioids to manage the pain. Apublication describing 191 patients being treated for HNC noted that of the 157 patients reporting the greatest amount of mouth and throat soreness, 70% were taking opioids to alleviate their pain.

 

  

Dehydration and malnutrition. Approximately 70% of patients with HNC receiving radiotherapy become unableto eat, drink, or both, often requiring nutrition through a gastrostomy tube or intravenous line.

 

  

Treatment interruption. SOM can be dose-limiting, requiring a reduction or delay in radiotherapy, leadingto poorer clinical outcomes. Approximately 11% of patients experience unplanned breaks of a week or more in radiotherapy, with each week of treatment delay decreasing tumor control by over 10%.

 

  

Increased economic burden. Approximately 16% of patients receiving radiotherapy for HNC are hospitalizeddue to SOM. Based on a third-party analysis of medical insurance claims covering 40 million patient years, patients with HNC and treated with radiotherapy who developed OM incurred, on average, approximately $32,000 in additional medicalexpenses in the first six months from the start of radiotherapy compared to such patients who did not develop OM.

Eachyear in the United States, approximately 65,000 patients are diagnosed with HNC, according to the American Cancer Society. In the five largest European markets, approximately 68,000 patients are diagnosed annually with HNC, and an additional 23,000in Japan.

All of the patients with locally advanced HNC being treated with standard-of-care radiotherapy are at risk for developing SOM and, based on observations from multiple studies, we estimate that approximately 70% will develop SOM and between 20% to 30% will develop Grade 4OM.

In a survey we conducted of 150 U.S. radiation oncologists, OM was identified as the most burdensome side effect caused byradiotherapy in patients being treated for HNC. OM was also characterized as the side effect most likely to cause treatment interruptions.

CurrentTreatment Landscape and Limitations

There are currently no FDA-approved drugs for thetreatment of OM in patients with HNC. The MASCC / ISOO developed the leading clinical practice guidelines for management of OM. These guidelines, which are summarized below, indicate the inadequacy of clinical evidence to support the effectivenessof existing approaches for the management of OM in patients with HNC, and that these approaches have been largely palliative to date.

 

  

Basic oral care. The guidelines suggest the use of basic oral care protocols to prevent OM across allcancer modalities; however, the guidelines indicate the clinical evidence is weak in supporting the effectiveness of this approach.

 

  

Anti-inflammatory agents. The guidelines suggest the use of benzydamine mouthwash to prevent OM inpatients with HNC, but only in patients receiving radiotherapy doses up to 50 gray without concomitant chemotherapy.

 

  

Antimicrobials, coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics. The guidelines suggest the use of 0.2%morphine mouthwash to treat pain associated with OM in patients with HNC.

 

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Laser and other light therapy. The guidelines suggest the use oflow-level laser therapy to prevent OM in patients with HNC receiving radiotherapy, without concomitant chemotherapy. However, the guidelines indicate that the clinical evidence supporting the effectiveness ofthis approach is weak.

 

  

Cryotherapy. The guidelines suggest the use of 30 minutes of oral cryotherapy to prevent OM inpatients receiving bolus 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (which is not applicable to standard-of-care radiotherapy for HNC).

 

  

Natural and other miscellaneous agents. Due to inadequate clinical evidence, no guideline is possible forsuch agents.

These MASCC/ ISOO guidelines demonstrate that there is a high unmet need for the treatment or preventionof OM in patients with HNC, driven by the lack of clear efficacy of the existing treatment options. No therapies are recommended for the treatment or prevention of OM in patients with HNC receiving more than 50 gray of radiotherapy. The gray, or Gy,is the International System of Units unit of absorbed radiation dose. This unmet need is further demonstrated by the findings from our survey of 150 U.S. radiation oncologists, where only 19% and 21% of physicians, respectively, stated that topicalagents are effective in preventing or reducing the incidence of SOM and in treating or reducing the duration of SOM in patients with HNC. The respondents also stated that effectiveness in preventing or reducing the incidence of SOM was the mostimportant product attribute. The FDA has also acknowledged this unmet need and the lack of effective therapies for the reduction of the duration, incidence and severity of SOM induced by radiotherapy by granting GC4419 Fast Track and BreakthroughTherapy Designation.

Our Solution: GC4419 for Radiotherapy-Induced Severe Oral Mucositis

GC4419, also known as avasopasem manganese, is a potent and highly selective small molecule dismutase mimetic we are developing for thereduction of SOM in patients with HNC. We believe GC4419, which to date is not approved for any indication, has the potential to address shortcomings associated with current approaches and become the standard of care treatment for SOM in patientswith locally advanced HNC.

Potential Benefits of GC4419 for Severe Oral Mucositis

We believe that GC4419 has the potential to be the first FDA-approved drug and the standard of carefor the reduction of SOM in patients with HNC receiving radiotherapy, with the following benefits:

 

  

Mechanism of action designed to address the root cause of OM: Unlike existing treatment optionsthat are largely symptomatic and reactive in nature, we believe GC4419 has the potential to address and mitigate the root cause of OM. GC4419 is designed to rapidly convert superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, reducing mucosal damage and thereby theincidence and severity of mucositis.

 

  

Compelling Randomized Phase 2b clinical data: Results from our Phase 2b trial demonstrate thepotential benefits of GC4419 across all evaluated parameters of SOM. GC4419 has received Fast Track and Breakthrough Therapy Designation from the FDA.

 

  

Maintenance of anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy: One year interim follow-up clinical data from our Phase 2b trial for GC4419 in patients with locally advanced HNC showed similar rates of tumor control and survival between GC4419 and placebo with no observed decrease in theanti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy. We believe this is significant as maintenance of anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy is of key importance to physicians when considering new drugs to manage side effects of radiotherapy.

 

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Higher patient adherence: The intravenous formulation of GC4419, administered in a clinical settingby a health care provider, promotes higher patient adherence, optimizing clinical outcomes.

Clinical Development of GC4419 forSevere Oral Mucositis

Below is a summary of our clinical development of GC4419 for the reduction of SOM in patients with locallyadvanced HNC.

 

Trial and Status

 

Trial Design

 

Trial Objectives

 

Trial Milestones

Phase 3 registrational trial for SOM in patients with locally advanced HNC receiving radiotherapy (ROMAN Trial)

 

Commenced in October 2018

 

•  Randomized, double-blinded, multi-center, placebo-controlled

•  Two arms: 90 mg and placebo

•  365 patients

 

•  Primary objective: evaluate efficacy of GC4419 relative to placebo in reducingthe incidence of SOM

•  Key secondary objectives: evaluate efficacy of GC4419 relative toplacebo in reducing:

•  the severity of SOM

•  the number of days of SOM experienced by all patients

•  One-year tumor outcomes andtwo-year survival rates will be collected

 

•  Enrollment expected to be completed by 2H 2020.

•  Top-line data expected in 1H 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phase 2a trial for SOM in patients with locally advanced HNC receiving radiotherapy

 

Planned

 

•  Multi-center in Europe

•  90 mg GC4419 given before each of typically 35 radiotherapy fractions

•  Up to 70 patients

 

•  Primary objective: assess safety of GC4419 in combination with IMRT andcisplatin

•  Key secondary objective: evaluate efficacy of GC4419 in reducing the incidence ofSOM

 

•  Trial expected to commence in 1H2020.

 

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Trial and Status

 

Trial Design

 

Trial Objectives

 

Trial Milestones

Phase 2b trial for SOM in patients with locally advanced HNC receiving radiotherapy

 

Completed

 

•  Randomized, double-blinded, multi-center, placebo-controlled

•  Three arms: 30 mg, 90 mg and placebo

•  223 patients

 

•  Primary objective: assess efficacy of GC4419 relative to placebo in reducingthe median duration of SOM

•  Key secondary objectives: assess efficacy of GC4419relative to placebo in reducing:

•  the incidence of SOM

•  the severity of SOM

•  Two-year tumor outcomes being collected

 

•  Primary endpoint met in 90 mg treatment arm:

•  median duration reduced 92% compared to placebo arm (p* = 0.024)

•  Key secondary endpoints:

•  incidence and severity of SOM in the 90 mg treatment arm reduced 34% and 47%,respectively

Phase 1b/2a trial for SOM in patients with locally advanced HNC receiving radiotherapy

 

Completed

 

•  Open-label, multi-center dose escalation trial

•  Doses ranged from 15 mg to 112 mg

•  46 patients

 

•  Primary objectives:

•  evaluate safety and tolerability of GC4419 in combination with IMRT and cisplatin

•  determine a maximum tolerated dose

•  Key secondary objectives: assess potential of GC4419 to reduce the incidence, severity andduration of SOM

•  One-year tumor outcomes alsocollected

 

•  GC4419 was well tolerated

•  Maximum tolerated dose was not reached

•  One-year tumor outcomes consistent with historical controlstudies

 

*

p-value represents the chance that the observed results occurred bychance alone. A p-value of less than 0.05 is considered statistically significant.

Ongoing ROMAN Trial (Phase 3)

In February 2018, GC4419 was granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation by the FDA for the reduction of the duration, incidence and severity ofSOM induced by radiotherapy with or without systemic therapy. As part of our correspondence with the FDA, we received the following guidance:

 

  

One pivotal trial is required to support a New Drug Application, NDA, filing;

 

  

The Phase 2b trial will be considered supportive to the Phase 3 pivotal trial;

 

  

Reduction in the incidence of SOM through the radiotherapy treatment period should be the primary endpoint of thePhase 3 registrational trial; and

 

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Two-year tumor outcomes from the Phase 2b trial and one-year tumor outcomes from the Phase 3 trial should be part of the NDA review.

InOctober 2018, we initiated a randomized, double-blinded, multicenter, placebo-controlled Phase 3 trial of GC4419 in patients with locally advanced HNC receiving radiotherapy, which we refer to as the Reduction in Oral Mucositis with AvasopasemManganese Trial, or ROMAN Trial. We plan to enroll approximately 365 patients in a 3:2 randomization favoring the GC4419 90 mg treatment arm. Like our Phase 1b/2a and Phase 2b trials, the eligible population is patients with locallyadvanced, squamous cell HNC who are eligible for seven weeks of standard-of-care radiotherapy.

ROMAN Trial Design (n=365 patients)

 

 

LOGO

The primary endpoint of the ROMAN Trial is the reduction in the incidence of SOM through the radiotherapyperiod for patients being treated with 90 mg of GC4419 as compared to placebo received as a 60-minute intravenous infusion less than 60 minutes before radiation, Monday to Friday, for seven weeks. Allpatients will be assessed twice weekly for OM by trained evaluators during the course of their radiotherapy treatment.

Secondaryendpoints include, among others, reduction in the severity of SOM and reduction in the number of days of SOM experienced by all patients, as well as the effect of treatment on tumor outcomes measured by overall survival, or OS, progression-freesurvival, or PFS, locoregional control, or LRC, and distant metastasis-free, or DM-free, rates. For these purposes, we define the severity of SOM as the incidence of Grade 4 OM. Adverse events will bemonitored during the trial period.

We expect to complete enrollment in the ROMAN Trial by the second half of 2020 and to report top-line data from this trial in the first half of 2021. If these results are positive, we plan to submit an NDA to the FDA.

Planned European Phase 2a Trial in Patients with HNC

We plan to initiate a Phase 2a multi-center trial of GC4419 in Europe evaluating GC4419 in combination with IMRT and concurrent cisplatin inpatients with locally advanced HNC. We expect to enroll up to 70 patients in this trial.

The primary objective of this trial will be toassess the safety of GC4419 in combination with IMRT and concurrent cisplatin. Secondary objectives are expected to include, among others, the reduction in the incidence of SOM through the radiotherapy period.

We expect to initiate this trial in the first half of 2020.

 

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Phase 2b Trial in Patients with HNC

In November 2016, we initiated a Phase 2b trial in 223 patients with locally advanced HNC being treated with radiotherapy across multiplesites in the United States and Canada. The trial was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial assessing the effects of GC4419 on the median duration, incidence and severity of SOM. Patients received 30 mg of GC4419, 90 mg ofGC4419 or placebo as a 60-minute infusion less than 60 minutes before radiation, Monday to Friday, for seven weeks. All patients were assessed twice weekly for OM by trained evaluators during the course oftheir radiotherapy treatment. If SOM was present in a patient at the end of the course of his or her radiotherapy treatment, that patient continued to be evaluated weekly for up to eight additional weeks.

 

LOGO

The primary endpoints of the trial were reduction in the median duration of SOM in the 90 mg and 30 mgtreatment arms. Median duration was defined as the number of days from when a patient was first assessed with SOM until the first day that patient was assessed with Grade 2 or less OM, with no subsequent occurrences of SOM.

In this trial, the 90 mg treatment arm of GC4419 demonstrated statistically significant reductions compared to placebo on the primaryendpoint. The median duration of SOM in this arm was 1.5 days, a 92% reduction compared to placebo (p=0.024).

Secondary endpointsincluded reduction in the incidence and severity of SOM in each of the 90 mg and 30 mg treatment arms. For these purposes, we define the severity of SOM as the incidence of Grade 4 OM. The incidence of SOM in the 90 mg treatment armwas reduced by 36% through 60 Gy and 34% through the full course of radiotherapy treatment compared to placebo and the severity of SOM in the 90 mg treatment arm was reduced by 47% through the full course of radiotherapy treatment compared toplacebo.

In the 30 mg treatment arm, intermediate reductions compared to placebo were observed in median duration of SOM (58%),incidence of SOM through 60 Gy (31%) and through the full course of radiotherapy treatment (8%), and in severity of SOM (30%) through the full course of radiotherapy treatment.

In the trial, we also observed an apparent delay in the onset of SOM in the 90 mg treatment arm compared to placebo, reduced usage ofopioids in both the 30 mg and 90 mg treatment arms compared to placebo, and reduced placement and use of gastrostomy tubes in the 90 mg treatment arm compared to placebo.

The following chart depicts the course of SOM in each patient in the 90 mg treatment arm or the placebo arm who experienced at least oneepisode of SOM during the course of his or her treatment and

 

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follow-up. Each bar represents a single patient and illustrates the length of time between that patient’s first evaluated instance of SOM and his orher last evaluated instance of SOM, along with the severity of his or her SOM during that interval.

 

LOGO

This chart demonstrates that (1) fewer patients in the 90 mg treatment arm developed SOM than inthe placebo arm, (2) fewer patients in the 90 mg treatment arm developed Grade 4 OM than in the placebo arm, and (3) on average, SOM did not last as long for patients in the 90 mg treatment arm. This is consistent with theobserved reductions in the individual numerical endpoints of median duration, incidence and severity.

We followed patients from thistrial for tumor outcomes out to two years following radiotherapy. In the two-year assessment of tumor outcomes, we observed similar outcomes among the three arms in OS, PFS, LRC and DM-free rates.

Tumor Outcomes Maintained through 2 Years

 

LOGO

 

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No difference was observed in the severity of adverse events among the three arms in thetrial and the most frequent adverse events were similar among the three arms.

Safety Profile of Both GC4419 Doses was Comparable to

Standard-of-Care Chemoradiotherapy (Placebo)

 

LOGO

The percentage of patients with the most common adverse events in the Phase 2b trial are shown in the tablebelow.

Most Frequent Adverse Events Similar

Across Active and Placebo Arms

 

LOGO

Phase 1b/2a Trial in Patients with HNC

In August 2016, we completed a Phase 1b/2a, open-label, multi-center, dose escalation trial of the safety, tolerability, pharmacodynamic andpharmacokinetic properties of GC4419 in combination with radiotherapy and concurrent cisplatin in 46 patients with locally advanced HNC. The objectives of this trial were to evaluate the safety and tolerability of GC4419 and to assess the potentialof GC4419 to reduce the duration, incidence and severity of SOM.

In this trial, patients were assigned to treatment duration groups basedupon the dose and duration of dosing of GC4419 received and we observed that the incidence, duration, and severity of SOM through six weeks of radiotherapy (with patients receiving a cumulative radiotherapy dose of 60 Gy) decreased for patients who

 

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received six to seven weeks of GC4419. In the group receiving six to seven weeks of GC4419, 29% of patients experienced SOM, with a median duration of 2.5 days, and no patients experiencedGrade 4 OM. GC4419 was well tolerated and a maximum tolerated dose was not reached.

Patients in the trial were followed for tumoroutcomes at one year post-radiotherapy. The observed LRC, DM-free, PFS, and OS rates in 44 patients evaluable for tumor outcome at one year were 93%, 93%, 84% and 93%, respectively. We believe these outcomesare similar to the outcomes observed in historical control studies, suggesting that GC4419 does not decrease the anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy.

Radiotherapy-Induced Esophagitis

Radiotherapy-induced esophagitis is a common and debilitating adverse effect that develops in patients receiving radiotherapy, most commonlyfor lung, esophageal, breast or head and neck cancers or for lymphoma. Radiotherapy-induced esophagitis is inflammation, edema, erythema, and erosion of the mucosal surface of the esophagus caused by radiotherapy. Symptoms can be life-threateningand include an inability to swallow, severe pain, ulceration, infection, bleeding and weight loss and may require hospitalization. The severity of esophagitis is graded using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, which is a five-pointgrading scale:

 

Grade 

Description

1 Patients are asymptomatic with only clinical observations
2 Patients are symptomatic with altered eating or swallowing, with oral supplements indicated
3 Patients exhibit severely altered eating or swallowing requiring tube feeding, total parenteral nutrition or hospitalization
4 Patient requires urgent operative intervention; condition is life-threatening
5 Results in death

Radiotherapy-induced esophagitis potentially represents a larger market opportunity than OM. In lung cancer(our first target market for esophagitis), there are approximately 230,000 new patients annually in the United States, of which approximately 50,000 are treated with radiotherapy. The overall frequency of Grade 2 or higher esophagitis in patientsreceiving radiotherapy for the treatment of lung cancer is approximately 50%. The results of our survey of 150 U.S. radiation oncologists suggested that they view OM data as being representative of potential efficacy in esophagitis, which we believesupports the feasibility of exploring the use of GC4419 for the reduction of esophagitis.

Current Treatment Landscape and itsLimitations

There are currently no FDA-approved drugs and no established guidelines for thetreatment of radiotherapy-induced esophagitis. Treatment options are not only ineffective but also largely symptomatic in nature, with medications being administered in conjunction with a focus on adequate hydration and nutrition. These approaches,which include various analgesics such as topical lidocaine and opioids, and tube or intravenous feeding, do not treat the underlying cause of radiotherapy-induced esophagitis.

Our Solution: GC4419 for Radiotherapy-Induced Esophagitis

Unlike existing treatment options that are largely palliative in nature, we believe GC4419 has the potential to address and mitigate the rootcause of radiotherapy-induced esophagitis. By removing superoxide, GC4419 is designed to reduce the damage radiotherapy ordinarily causes to the patient’s esophageal mucosa, and thereby reduce the incidence of radiotherapy-induced esophagitis.We believe GC4419 has the potential to become the standard of care for the reduction in the incidence of radiotherapy-induced esophagitis in patients with lung cancer.

 

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Clinical Development of GC4419 for Esophagitis

Below is a summary of our clinical development of GC4419 for the treatment of esophagitis.

 

Trial and Status

 

Trial Design

 

Trial Objectives

 

Trial Milestones

Phase 2a trial for esophagitis in patients with lung cancer receiving IMRT

 

Planned

 

•  90 mg GC4419 given before each of typically 30 radiotherapy fractions

•  Approximately 60 patients

 

•  Primary objective: assess efficacy of GC4419 in reducing the incidence ofGrade 2 or higher esophagitis

 

•  Trial expected to commence in 1H 2020.

Planned Phase 2a Trial in Patients with Lung Cancer

We plan to initiate a Phase 2a trial of GC4419 in combination with radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy in approximately 60 patients withlung cancer.

The primary endpoint of the trial will be to assess the efficacy of GC4419 in reducing the incidence of Grade 2 or higheresophagitis in these patients. We expect to begin enrollment in the trial in the first half of 2020.

Increasing Anti-Cancer Efficacy of Radiotherapy

As cancer cells are much more sensitive than normal cells to elevated hydrogen peroxide, we believe the conversion of excesssuperoxide to hydrogen peroxide by our dismutase mimetics has the potential to increase the anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy. We are evaluating our dismutase mimetics to determine their ability to increase the anti-cancer efficacy of high dailydoses of radiotherapy, which we have demonstrated in our pre-clinical studies. This increased efficacy could be particularly important in settings where the current anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy aloneis insufficient to achieve the desired outcome.

Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Overview

Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which solid tumors form in the tissues of the pancreas. It is a particularly aggressive form of cancer andrepresents the third-leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States with approximately 57,000 new diagnoses and 46,000 deaths estimated in 2019. In the five largest European markets and Japan, there were approximately 109,000 new pancreaticcancer diagnoses in 2018. Approximately 30% of newly-diagnosed patients have non-metastatic disease that is unresectable due to the location of the primary tumor or its relationship to the surroundingvasculature. The first line of treatment for patients with unresectable tumors is chemotherapy. For those patients whose tumors remain unresectable following chemotherapy, SBRT is an emerging treatment option. Even with SBRT as an option, patientswith pancreatic cancer often have a poor prognosis, with a five-year survival rate of only approximately 5%. As a result, there remains a large unmet need to increase the effectiveness of disease management and ultimately improve outcomes forpatients.

Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Overview

According to the National Cancer Institute, or NCI, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States. The NCIestimates that in 2018 there were approximately 234,000 new cases of lung cancer (both NSCLC and small cell lung cancer) in the United States and approximately 154,000 deaths. Patients with NSCLC are typically treated with some combination ofsurgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and immunotherapy, depending on the severity of their disease, and SBRT is an established radiotherapy treatment for some forms of NSCLC. Even with all these current treatment options, the 5-year relative survivalrate from 2008 to 2014 for patients with lung cancer was 18.6%. As such, improving the effectiveness of lung cancer treatment and improving patient outcomes represents a significant unmet need.

 

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Our Solution: GC4711 for Increasing Anti-Cancer Efficacy in Patients Receiving SBRT

GC4711 is our second dismutase mimetic product candidate. We are specifically targeting GC4711, an analog of GC4419, to increase theanti-cancer efficacy of SBRT. It is currently in Phase 1 development both as a lyophilized product for intravenous administration given over 15 minutes and as an oral capsule. Based on our extensivepre-clinical data, we believe GC4711 has the potential to increase the anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy, and that it may also protect normal tissue during SBRT. By adding GC4711 to a SBRT regimen, webelieve not only that our dismutase mimetics’ conversion of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide may increase the anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy at current doses, but that patients may also be able to tolerate higher doses of radiotherapy.

In December 2017, we completed a Phase 1 single-dose trial of intravenously-administered GC4711 in Australia. The objectives of the trialwere to assess the safety and tolerability of GC4711 and to characterize the pharmacokinetic profile of GC4711 in healthy volunteers. In the first stage of this trial, a sentinel cohort of four healthy volunteers received a single 30 mg intravenousdose of GC4711 over one hour, followed by a clinical safety review in which GC4711 was observed to be well tolerated with no serious adverse events. In the second stage of the trial, 32 healthy volunteers received a single 50 mg intravenous dose ofGC4711 over one hour.

In this trial, GC4711 was observed to be well tolerated, with the most frequently reported adverse events beingmild to moderate headache and infusion site pain. There were no Grade 3, 4, or 5 adverse events, and no adverse events led to withdrawal from the study.

We are currently assessing GC4711 in a second Australian Phase 1 study, examining dose escalation of15-minute intravenous infusions in healthy volunteers. We plan to use the results of these studies to support an Investigative New Drug Application, or IND, filing for intravenous GC4711 delivered via 15-minute infusion by the end of 2019.

Pre-Clinical Results

We have observed in multiple xenograft and syngeneic tumor mouse models a strong correlation between the daily dose of radiation andthe increase in anti-cancer efficacy with our dismutase mimetics. Notably, we observed that many of the mice at the highest daily dose of radiotherapy with a dismutase mimetic became tumor-free. The results ofone such study, in which mice bearing NSCLC xenograft tumors received 24 mg/kg of GC4419 daily for five days concurrent with one of four different radiotherapy dosage regimens, are depicted below. For example, 5 Gy x 5 RT indicates that themice received five daily doses of five Gy each. These radiotherapy regimens were selected because, without the addition of our dismutase mimetic, each should produce an equivalent reduction in tumor growth. The data reflects that expected result,but the increase in anti-cancer efficacy with addition of the dismutase mimetic increases significantly at the higher daily doses of radiotherapy.

H1299 Human NSCLC Tumors in Mice

 

        

      5 Gy x 5 RT              7 Gy x 3 RT              10 Gy x2 RT          18 Gy x 1 RT            

 

LOGO

 

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In another pre-clinical study, mice bearingpancreatic cancer xenograft tumors treated with a single 12 Gy dose demonstrated a meaningful decrease in tumor volume when GC4419 was added, as depicted below. We believe that this result shows that our dismutase mimetics have the potential tosynergize with SBRT to rapidly convert superoxide to hydrogen peroxide and exploit cancer cells’ increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide to promote cancer cell death.

 

LOGO

Additional pre-clinical studies have provided further evidencesupporting our dismutase mimetics’ biological mechanism in combination with radiotherapy in solid tumors. To test the hypothesis that our dismutase mimetics’ conversion of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide increases the anti-cancer efficacyof radiotherapy, we genetically engineered NSCLC tumors to overexpress catalase enzyme when triggered. This overexpression of catalase, a native enzyme that rapidly removes hydrogen peroxide, blocked the dismutase mimetic’s synergy withradiotherapy in an experiment similar to the ones described above.

 

LOGO

We believe the results of our studies represent significant potential in the treatment of cancer,particularly as recent advances in radiotherapy, such as SBRT, are capable of administering targeted, high daily doses of

 

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radiotherapy to solid tumors. SBRT utilizes several beams of various intensities aimed at different angles to precisely target the tumor, with the goal of delivering the highest possible dose ofradiotherapy to kill cancer cells while minimizing exposure to normal cells. For example, SBRT is an established radiotherapy treatment for NSCLC, used increasingly for small, peripheral lung tumors. Data to date suggest that SBRT could alsoincrease the anti-cancer efficacy and safety of radiotherapy for many other patients with NSCLC, LAPC and other cancers. SBRT application for large or centrally located NSCLC tumors, however, faces unique challenges, as lung and other toxicitieslimit the amount of radiotherapy patients can tolerate. As such, the most suitable patients for this procedure currently are those with smaller, well-defined tumors who are ineligible for or cannot tolerate surgery.

The increase in anti-cancer efficacy of SBRT with our dismutase mimetics has been shown in a variety of models of lung, pancreatic, head andneck, breast and other cancers. In addition, because low oxygen levels typically found deep in larger tumors can interfere with the anti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy, it is important that our dismutase mimetics appear to also increase anti-cancerefficacy in hypoxic tumor models. Further, they may also reduce the normal tissue toxicities that restrict the patients now eligible for SBRT. Because of this we believe that the combination of GC4711 and SBRT has the potential to further increasethe anti-cancer efficacy of and to broaden the group of patients who can benefit from SBRT.

The clinical research community is alsoexploring the possibility of increasing the anti-cancer efficacy of SBRT by combining it with checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy, merging the targeted efficacy of radiotherapy with the demonstrated durability of checkpoint therapy. In pre-clinical models combining our dismutase mimetics with SBRT and anti-PD-1, anti-PD-L1 or anti-CTLA4 checkpoint therapy, this triple combination was more effective than combinations of SBRT combined with checkpoint therapy or SBRT combined with dismutase mimetic. The triplecombination increased control of the irradiated primary tumors and also appeared to reduce the metastatic spread of the cancer and even controlled pre-existing tumors outside the radiation field. Based uponthese data, we believe there is an opportunity to assess the combination of SBRT, checkpoint therapy and GC4711 as a novel approach to treating various cancers.

Clinical Development for Increasing Anti-Cancer Efficacy

Below is a summary of our clinical development of our dismutase mimetics for increasing theanti-cancer efficacy of radiotherapy.

 

Trial and Status

 

Trial Design

 

Trial Objectives

 

Trial Milestones

Phase 1b/2a pilot trial of GC4419 in patients with LAPC

 

Commenced in February 2018

 

Future trials in this indication planned to be conducted with GC4711

 

•  Adaptive dose escalation trial

•  Three dose levels of SBRT being evaluated with each patient receiving five doses of SBRT

•  SBRT daily dose levels range from 10 Gy/dose to 12 Gy/dose

•  Two arms: 90 mg and placebo

•  48 patients

 

•  Primary objective: determine the maximum tolerated dose of SBRT when combinedwith GC4419 relative to placebo

•  Key secondary objectives: assess progression-free survival andoverall response rate with 90 mg GC4419 relative to placebo

 

•  Top-line data expected in 2H2020.

 

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Trial and Status

 

Trial Design

 

Trial Objectives

 

Trial Milestones

Phase 1b/2a trial of GC4711 in patients with NSCLC

 

Planned

 

•  Open-label safety run-in of SBRT andGC4711 in approximately 15 patients

•  Followed by double-blind trial of SBRT, checkpointinhibitor and GC4711

•  Two arms: active and placebo

•  60 patients

 

•  Primary objective: safety and improvements in measures of pneumonitis

•  Key secondary objectives: objective response rate, progression-free survival and overallsurvival

 

•  Trial expected to commence in 2H 2020.

Phase 1b/2a Trial of GC4419 in Patients with LAPC

In February 2018, we initiated an adaptive dose escalation Phase 1b/2a pilot trial of GC4419 in combination with SBRT in patients with LAPC.We expect to enroll 48 patients in the trial. Three dose levels of SBRT are being evaluated and each patient is expected to receive a total of five doses of SBRT at daily dose levels ranging from 10 Gy/dose to 12 Gy/dose.

The primary endpoint of the trial is to determine the maximum tolerated dose of SBRT when combined with 90 mg of GC4419 or placebo.

Secondary endpoints in the trial include, among others, progression-free survival and overall response rate in each of the arms.

As of August 31, 2019, 19 patients had been enrolled in this trial at a single center. We reviewed preliminary, unaudited data from these 19patients and observed numerical differences in progression-free survival, in local tumor response rate and in overall response rate in favor of the GC4419 arm, when compared to placebo. The foregoing preliminary data are subject to change as moredata on these patients and additional patients become available and are subject to audit and verification procedures that could result in material changes in the final data.

This trial is now multi-center as additional cancer centers have been activated. We do not plan to conduct further review of results until thestudy has been completed. We expect to report top-line data from this trial in the second half of 2020.

Phase 1b/2a Trial of GC4711 inPatients with NSCLC

We plan to initiate a Phase 1b/2a trial of GC4711 in combination with radiotherapy and checkpoint inhibitortherapy in approximately 75 patients with NSCLC. Approximately 15 patients will be a part of the open-label safety run-in and then approximately 30 patients will be randomized into each of the placebo andactive treatment arms. The primary objective of the trial will be to assess safety and improvements in measures of pneumonitis. Key secondary objectives will include objective response rate, progression-free survival and overall survival. This studyis being partially funded by NCI. We expect to begin enrollment in the trial in the second half of 2020.

Oral Formulation of GC4711

Pre-clinical studies conducted by us suggest that GC4711 can also be delivered orally. We arecurrently evaluating candidate capsule formulations of GC4711 in a Phase 1 trial in healthy volunteers in Australia.

 

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Manufacturing

We do not own or operate, and currently have no plans to establish, any manufacturing facilities. We currently rely, and expect to continue torely, on third party contract manufacturing organizations, or CMOs, for the supply of current good manufacturing practice-grade, or cGMP-grade, clinical trial materials and commercial quantities of our product candidates and products, if approved.We require all of our CMOs to conduct manufacturing activities in compliance with cGMP requirements and we maintain our GC4419 product candidate in refrigerated conditions prior to intravenous infusion. We have assembled a team of experiencedemployees and consultants to provide the necessary technical, quality and regulatory oversight of our CMOs.

We anticipate that these CMOswill have the capacity to support both clinical supply and commercial-scale production, but we do not have any formal agreements at this time with any of these CMOs to cover commercial production. We believe that we have or will have sufficientquantities of drug substance and drug product to supply our current Phase 3 trial of GC4419 for the reduction of SOM. We are in the process of implementing a redundant supply chain for GC4419 drug substance and drug product, with long-termagreements in place, to provide the drug substance and drug product prior to submission of an NDA.

We also may elect to pursue additionalCMOs for manufacturing supplies of drug substance and finished drug product in the future. We believe that our standardized manufacturing process can be transferred to a number of other CMOs for the production of clinical and commercial supplies ofour product candidates in the ordinary course of business.

Commercialization

Our aim is to become a fully integrated biopharmaceutical company. At this stage of the company, we have not yet established a commercialorganization or distribution capabilities. We intend to commercialize GC4419, if approved, by building a specialized sales and marketing organization in the United States focused on radiation oncologists. We believe a scientifically oriented,customer-focused team of approximately 40 sales representatives would allow us to effectively reach the approximately 4,000 radiation oncologists in the United States, who treat patients using an even smaller number of radiation machines. Because ofthe limited number of physicians concentrated around a smaller number of radiation machines, we believe we can effectively commercialize GC4419, if approved, in the United States with a small, focused commercial organization. We also expect toleverage this sales organization to commercialize GC4711, if approved, and any of our future product candidates in the United States. Outside the United States, we may seek to establish collaborations for the commercialization of GC4419 and ourother product candidates.

Competition

The biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries put significant emphasis and resources into the development of novel and proprietary therapiesfor cancer treatment. While we believe that our knowledge, experience and scientific resources provide us with competitive advantages, we face potential competition from many different sources, including large and specialty pharmaceutical andbiotechnology companies, academic research institutions and governmental agencies and public and private research institutions. Any product candidates that we successfully develop and commercialize will compete with existing treatment options andnew therapies that may become available in the future.

Many of our potential competitors may have significantly greater financialresources, a more established presence in the market, and more expertise in research and development, manufacturing, pre-clinical and clinical testing, obtaining regulatory approvals and reimbursement, andmarketing approved products than we do. Mergers and acquisitions in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostic industries may result in even more resources being concentrated among a smaller number of our competitors. Smaller or early stagecompanies may also prove to be significant competitors, particularly through collaborative arrangements with large and established companies. These potential competitors may also compete with us in recruiting and retaining top

 

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qualified scientific, sales, marketing and management personnel and establishing clinical trial sites and patient registration for clinical trials, as well as in acquiring technologiescomplementary to, or necessary for, our programs.

The key competitive factors affecting the success of GC4419, GC4711 and any of ourother product candidates, if approved, are likely to be their efficacy, safety, convenience, price, the level of generic competition and the availability of reimbursement from government and other third-party payors. There are currently noFDA-approved drugs for the treatment of OM in patients with HNC and no FDA-approved drugs or established guidelines for the treatment of radiotherapy-induced esophagitis.

A number of large pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies that currently market and sell drugs or biologics are pursuing the development oftherapies in the fields in which we are interested. Our commercial opportunity for any of our product candidates could be reduced or eliminated if our competitors develop and commercialize products that are safer, more effective, less expensive,more convenient or easier to administer, or have fewer or less severe side effects, than any products that we may develop. Because our product candidates are designed to reduce the side effects of radiotherapy, our commercial opportunity could alsobe reduced or eliminated if radiotherapy methods are improved in a way that reduces the incidence of such side effects, or if new therapies are developed which effectively treat cancer without causing such side effects. Our competitors also mayobtain FDA, EMA or other regulatory approval for their products more rapidly than we may obtain approval for ours, which could result in our competitors establishing a strong market position before we are able to enter the market.

Intellectual Property

Our commercialsuccess depends in part on our ability to obtain and maintain proprietary protection for GC4419, GC4711 and any of our other product candidates, manufacturing methods and processes, novel discoveries, and otherknow-how; to operate without infringing on or otherwise violating the proprietary rights of others; and to prevent others from infringing or otherwise violating our proprietary rights. Our policy is to seek toprotect our proprietary position by, among other methods, filing or in-licensing U.S. and foreign patents and patent applications related to our product candidates and other proprietary technologies,inventions and improvements, including claims related to composition of matter and methods of use, that are important to the development and implementation of our business. We also rely on trademarks, trade secrets,know-how, continuing technological innovation and potential in-licensing opportunities to develop and maintain our proprietary position. For more information, please see“Risk Factors—Risks Related to Intellectual Property.”

Patents and Patent Applications

As of September 30, 2019, our owned and currently pending and/or in-force patent portfolio consisted of approximately 15 issued U.S.patents, six pending U.S. patent applications, 69 issued foreign patents including seven issued European patents that have been validated in many European countries, and 63 pending foreign applications.

The term of individual patents depends upon the legal term for patents in the countries in which they are obtained. In most countries in whichwe file, including the United States, the patent term is 20 years from the earliest filing date of a non-provisional patent application. In the United States, a patent’s term may be lengthened by patentterm adjustment, which compensates a patentee for administrative delays by the USPTO, in examining and granting a patent, or may be shortened if a patent is terminally disclaimed over an earlier expiring patent. In some instances, such a patent termadjustment may result in the term of a United States patent extending beyond 20 years from the earliest filing date of a non-provisional patent application. In the United States, the term of a patent thatcovers a drug product may also be eligible for patent term extension when regulatory approval is granted, provided the legal requirements are met. This permits patent term restoration as compensation for the patent term lost during the FDAregulatory review process. The Hatch-Waxman Act

 

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permits a patent term extension of up to a maximum of five years beyond the expiration of the patent if the patent is eligible for such an extension under the Hatch-Waxman Act. The length of thepatent term extension is related to the length of time the drug is under regulatory review; however, it cannot extend the remaining term of a patent beyond a total of 14 years from the date of product approval. Only one patent applicable to anapproved drug may be extended. Similar provisions are available in Europe and certain other jurisdictions to extend the term of a patent that covers an approved drug. In the future, if and when our drug candidates receive approval by the FDA orforeign regulatory authorities, we expect to apply for patent term extensions on issued patents covering those drugs, depending upon the length of the clinical trials for each drug and other factors.

The two most advanced product candidates in our portfolio, GC4419 and GC4711, are protected by issued patents with claims directed tocomposition of matter and method of use. GC4419 is covered by a composition of matter patent in the United States that has a natural expiration date in 2022. However, we believe GC4419 may be eligible for a patent term extension under theHatch-Waxman Act of no more than four and a half years which, if granted, could result in an expiration date in 2027. GC4711 is covered by a composition of matter patent in the United States, which also covers oral viability of the productcandidate, and has a natural expiration date in 2036. However, we believe GC4711 may be eligible for a patent term extension of at least about two years which, if granted, could result in an expiration date in 2038. The U.S. patent family coveringthe method of treating OM has a natural expiration date in late 2027, and if we are successful in obtaining a patent term extension of approximately two and a half years which we believe should be available, could result in an expiration date inearly 2030. The U.S. patent family covering treating tissue damage resulting from radiation therapy, chemotherapy or a combination thereof by administering a high dose of GC4419 has a natural expiration date in 2032. When including patent termextensions, our product candidate portfolio is projected to expire between 2027 and 2038 in the United States.

However, there can be noassurance that any of our pending patent applications will issue or that we will benefit from any patent term extension or favorable adjustment to the term of any of our patents. The applicable authorities, including the FDA in the United States,may not agree with our assessment of whether such patent term extensions should be granted, and if granted, they may grant more limited extensions than we request.

We also have pending patent families in the United States that cover certain combinations of our product candidates with several oncologyproducts that may provide protection for the use of our product candidates in connection with those oncology products, which, if granted, are projected to expire between 2037 and 2039.

Trademarks and Trade Secrets

Asof September 30, 2019, our trademark portfolio contained two U.S. trademark registrations, for GALERA and GALERA THERAPEUTICS.

Furthermore, we rely upon trade secrets, know-how, continuing technological innovation and potential in-licensing opportunities to develop and maintain our competitive position. We seek to protect our proprietary information, in part, using confidentiality and invention assignment agreements with our commercialpartners, collaborators, employees, and consultants. These agreements are designed to protect our proprietary information and, in the case of the invention assignment agreements, to grant us ownership of technologies that are developed through arelationship with an employee or a third party. These agreements may be breached, and we may not have adequate remedies for any such breach. In addition, our trade secrets may otherwise become known or be independently discovered by competitors. Tothe extent that our commercial partners, collaborators, employees, and consultants use intellectual property owned by others in their work for us, disputes may arise as to the rights in related or resultingknow-how and inventions.

Royalty Agreement with Clarus

In November 2018, we entered into an Amended and Restated Purchase and Sale Agreement, or the Royalty Agreement, by and among us, Clarus IVGalera Royalty AIV, L.P., Clarus IV-A, L.P., Clarus IV-B,

 

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L.P., Clarus IV-C, L.P. and Clarus IV-D, L.P., or, collectively, Clarus. Pursuant to the Royalty Agreement, Clarusagreed to pay us, in the aggregate, up to $80 million, or the Royalty Purchase Price, in four tranches of $20 million each upon the achievement of specified clinical milestones in our ROMAN Trial. We agreed to apply the proceeds from suchpayments primarily to support clinical development and regulatory activities for GC4419, GC4711 and any pharmaceutical product comprising or containing GC4419 or GC4711, or, collectively, the Products, as well as to satisfy working capitalobligations and for general corporate expenses. We achieved the first milestone under the Royalty Agreement and received the first tranche of the Royalty Purchase Price in November 2018 and received the second tranche of the Royalty Purchase Pricein April 2019 in connection with the achievement of the second milestone under the Royalty Agreement in March 2019.

In connection withthe payment of each tranche of the Royalty Purchase Price, we have agreed to sell, convey, transfer and assign to Clarus all of our right, title and interest in a mid-single digit percentage of (i) thegross amount from the worldwide sale of the Products less certain items, including refunds, allowances, credits for recalls, customary discounts for purchase chargebacks, taxes in connection with transportation and/or delivery of Products,income-based taxes, customary distributor fees and commissions and customary distribution and transportation charges, and (ii) all recoveries, consideration, compensation, payments, collections, settlements and other amounts (including damages,awards, interest and penalties) of any kind or nature actually received by us or our affiliates, licensees and sublicensees in substitution or compensation for, or otherwise in lieu of, any net sales of the Products arising out of or resulting fromany proceeding brought, or assertion made, by us against any third party relating to or arising out of any infringement, misuse or misappropriation by such third party of our intellectual property rights in the Products, less all out-of-pocket costs and expenses incurred by us or our affiliates, licensees and sublicensees in connection with such enforcement action, or, collectively, the ProductPayments, during the Royalty Period. The Royalty Period means, on a Product-by-Product andcountry-by-country basis, the period of time commencing on the commercial launch of such Product in such country and ending on the latest to occur of (i) the 12thanniversary of such commercial launch, (ii) the expiration of all valid claims of our patents covering such Product in such country, and (iii) the expiration of regulatory data protection or market exclusivity or similar regulatoryprotection afforded by the health authorities in such country, to the extent such protection or exclusivity effectively prevents generic versions of such product from entering the market in such country.

If Clarus fails to fund the full amount of any remaining tranche of the Royalty Purchase Price within two business days of the conditions tothe payment of such tranche having been satisfied, we may terminate our obligation to accept such tranche and any additional remaining tranches. In such event, Clarus’s aggregate right, title and interest in the Product Payments shall bereduced to a low single-digit percentage.

Under the Royalty Agreement, if we commercialize our product candidates, we must establish atrained sales force sufficiently in advance of the anticipated commercial launch of our products. Along with other conditions, we may not grant any exclusive right or license under our patents and know-howrelated to our product candidates to any third party without the prior written consent of Clarus. In addition, we may not enter into any out-license that would expressly allow a third party to use ourintellectual property to develop or commercialize a product that is competitive with the Products.

The Royalty Agreement will remain ineffect until the date on which the aggregate amount of the Product Payments remitted to or otherwise received by Clarus exceeds a fixed single-digit multiple of the actual amount of the Royalty Purchase Price paid to and accepted by us in accordancewith the terms of the Royalty Agreement, unless earlier terminated pursuant to the mutual written agreement of us and Clarus.

Government Regulation

The FDA and comparable regulatory authorities in state and local jurisdictions and in other countries impose substantial andburdensome requirements upon companies involved in the clinical development, manufacture, marketing and distribution of drugs, such as those we are developing. These agencies and other

 

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federal, state and local entities regulate, among other things, the research and development, testing, manufacture, quality control, safety, effectiveness, labeling, storage, record keeping,approval, advertising and promotion, distribution, post-approval monitoring and reporting, sampling and export and import of our product candidates.

U.S. Government Regulation

Inthe United States, the FDA regulates drugs under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, or FDCA, and its implementing regulations. The process of obtaining regulatory approvals and the subsequent compliance with appropriate federal, state, localand foreign statutes and regulations requires the expenditure of substantial time and financial resources. Failure to comply with the applicable U.S. requirements at any time during the product development process, approval process or afterapproval, may subject an applicant to a variety of administrative or judicial sanctions, such as the FDA’s refusal to approve pending NDAs, withdrawal of an approval, imposition of a clinical hold, issuance of warning letters, product recalls,product seizures, total or partial suspension of production or distribution, injunctions, fines, refusals of government contracts, restitution, disgorgement or civil or criminal penalties.

The process required by the FDA before a drug may be marketed in the United States generally involves the following:

 

  

completion of pre-clinical laboratory tests, animal studies andformulation studies in compliance with the FDA’s good laboratory practice, or GLP, regulations;

 

  

submission to the FDA of an Investigational New Drug application, or IND, which must become effective beforehuman clinical trials may begin;

 

  

approval by an independent IRB, at each clinical site before each trial may be initiated;

 

  

performance of adequate and well-controlled human clinical trials in accordance with good clinical practice, orGCP, requirements to establish the safety and efficacy of the proposed drug product for each indication;

 

  

submission to the FDA of an NDA;

 

  

satisfactory completion of an FDA advisory committee review, if applicable;

 

  

satisfactory completion of an FDA inspection of the manufacturing facility or facilities at which the product isproduced to assess compliance with current good manufacturing practice, or cGMP, requirements and to assure that the facilities, methods and controls are adequate to preserve the drug’s identity, strength, quality and purity;

 

  

FDA review and approval of the NDA, including consideration of the views of any FDA advisory committee, prior tocommercial marketing or sale of the drug in the United States; and

 

  

Compliance with any post-approval requirements, including the potential requirement to implement a RiskEvaluation and Mitigation Strategy, or REMS, or to conduct a post-approval study.

Pre-Clinical Studies

Pre-clinical studies include laboratory evaluation of product chemistry, toxicity and formulation, aswell as animal studies to assess potential safety and efficacy. An IND sponsor must submit the results of the pre-clinical studies, together with manufa